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Food

Autumn’s in the air!

With its still-warm days and but the arrival of crisp evenings, autumn is an exciting time for fresh produce. The fruits and vegetables that required time to ripen over the summer months are at their best early in the season and are now ready for you to enjoy.

March sees an abundance of deliciously fresh pears, apples, figs, pomegranates and pumpkin. Treat your taste buds to these tempting recipes and perfect wine matches.

Fresh Figs with Blue Cheese & Prosciutto – pair with an aged Riesling

In this dish the figs bring vibrant fruit flavour and the cheese and cured meat give a salty edge. Aged Riesling pairs well as the intensity of the fruit flavours match that of the fig, whilst the richer honey notes of the Riesling offset the saltiness of the cheese and the prosciutto.

Pancetta-wrapped chicken braised in perry with pear and walnut salad – pair with Chardonnay

The pancetta has added richness and a hint of salt to the chicken. Chardonnay has enough body to compliment this dish whilst the nutty notes are a great match to the walnut salad.

Rag pasta with pumpkin, sage and tomatoes – pair with Barbera

Barbera is a perfect wine match for two reasons – this dish is medium-bodied so it calls for a medium-bodied wine, plus the high acidity of the tomato is complimented by Barbera’s lovely soft tannins.

Upside down tarte tatin – pair with Botrytis Semillon

Botrytis Semillon is a full-bodied wine with intense honey and stone fruit flavours. The body, richness and fruit intensity is perfectly matched to the fruit intensity and power of the dish.

Chocolate mousse with pomegranate granite – pair with Muscat

Chocolate itself is rich, deep and intense – the rancio and dried fruit flavours of Muscat marry this perfectly.

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Food
Seasonal Abalone
Words by Libby Travers on 14 Jun 2016
Noma restaurant’s temporary Sydney relocation has swept a wind of change through our kitchens. Their (self-proclaimed) mission was to put Australia on the plate. Drawing on culinary traditions and native ingredients without fear or favour, Rene Redzepi and his team painted an image of Australia’s culinary culture. The exercise drew out questions, ideas and inspiration. One dish that encapsulated this combination of native ingredient and cultural cringe was the abalone schnitzel. A mainstay of the Australian pub menu, the ‘schnitty’ is likely to have found its way on to Australian tables following the post-WWII wave of immigration from Europe. The abalone, on the other hand, had been a part of the Australian diet for many, many years before that. Abalone history Also known as mutton fish, abalone has been a part of aboriginal diets for thousands of years. Their distinctive flat, oval shells, replete with mother of pearl inlay, have been discovered in middens along Australia’s coastline. Favouring cold waters with high salt content, regular tidal movement and abundant seaweed forests (for food), the southern Australian coastline provides one of the world’s best natural environments for abalone. This is reflected in industry: Victoria has served as an important abalone fishery since the late 1950s, while Tasmania now supplies around a quarter of the annual world abalone harvest. This is in part due to the overfishing of abalone stocks globally. As abalone is highly prized, and can reach impressive prices at market (around $100/kg), many abalone fisheries have been plundered by poachers on top of the commercial market, leaving them decimated. We are certainly not immune, however, abalone fishing is heavily protected in Australia with commercial diving licenses limited by haul quantity and shell size, and is also regulated to protect breeding grounds. Recreational divers can also brave the elements (and often shark infested waters) to prize the muscle from rocks, but their haul is also severely limited (it varies state to state). Flavour profile A prized delicacy, particularly in Japan and China, abalone is somewhat similar to squid in regards to flavour and texture. It also reacts in a similar manner when cooked and benefits from super quick flash frying or long and slow braising. Anything in between renders it too tough and chewy to be enjoyable. Select and store We have four key varieties of abalone in Australia: greenlip, blacklip, brownlip and Roe’s abalone. There is a farmed cocktail size now also available. If you are lucky enough to get your hands on fresh, live abalone, Stephanie Alexander suggests storing them like you would live oysters - in a wet hessian bag in a cool spot. To clean the abalone, slide a sharp knife under the muscle to separate it from the shell. Generally you will then cut out the v-shaped stomach (although in some cultures this is kept in place and eaten with the rest of the abalone). Scrubbing the surface of the abalone is also suggested to remove the coloured membrane and frill around the edge. Abalone is then most often sliced very finely for quick cooking, or a little wider for a long braise. It is often tenderised with a meat mallet to help break down the muscle fibres. Abalone love Soy sauce, mirin, ginger, sake, garlic, butter, chilli, lemon.
Life
Native uprising
Words by Libby Travers on 30 May 2016
What is a taste of Australia? Waves of immigration have painted broad culinary brushstrokes and shaped our cooking, making Australia one of the most open-minded, adventurous and diverse culinary nations on the globe. But Looking at the food culture we’ve created it is very apparent what it isn’t – natural. It has only been relatively recently we have seen this veil lift. Chefs, albeit predominantly foreign chefs, are placing the emphasis on our native ingredients, learning their stories and understanding the virtues hidden in what remains a very foreign landscape for far too many.   Ben Shewry, who runs Attica, one of Australia’s most lauded restaurants, is one such chef. A New Zealander, Shewry has built his restaurant on innovation and understanding of the local environment. Alongside his large gardens at Ripponlea, Melbourne, Shewry’s team are often found foraging for local ingredients along our shores. Dishes such as wattleseed bread, salted red kangaroo with bunya bunya and goolwa pippies are testament to this. Scottish chef Jock Zonfrillo, of Orana in Adelaide, has taken this a step (or is it a giant leap) further by spending weeks at a time visiting remote regions of Australia to learn from Australia’s indigenous people. The lessons he is bringing back into his kitchen are fascinating. This has been his approach from the beginning: “I was told in the mid 90s, when I first arrived in Australia, there wasn’t much to investigate with regards to Australian food,” explains Zonfrillo, “I thought it impossible that there was 50,000 years of some kind of food culture and ingredients that were not worth looking at.” Of course, Zonfrillo was right. “I took myself down to Circular Quay and sat down next to an Aboriginal fella who was busking with a Didgeridoo. "I introduced myself and asked if I could talk about food and culture with him. We had conversations that day about catching a particular fish and only using a specific wood to cook that fish, how hot the coals had to be, the aroma of the fish as it cooked over the coals and how the plant within weeped its citric juices through the fish from the inside out – I could have been talking to a highly trained chef.” Indigenous agriculture Our soil is some of the oldest in the world. It is unique and very delicate. And yet, all the crops and animals we put in it and over it, all the fresh produce in our supermarkets and our farmers’ markets, are foreign species only introduced over the past two centuries. In Bruce Pascoe’s book Dark Emu he presents a compelling argument for pre-colonial agriculture in Australia, citing examples of complex aquaculture systems, grain crops and indeed silos, and seasonal planning. While the book serves to throw off the hunter-gatherer label of indigenous Australia, it also serves to open up the question as to what else has been missed. For example, many Aboriginal nations worked to a six-season cycle for the year. This was not prescribed across the whole country, with different Aboriginal nations working to different timetables depending on the earth, the migratory patterns of the local animals and the weather (with the wind as much a factor as the rains). Why did we think a cookie-cutter idea of seasonal variation would be the most applicable to our wide, brown land? A world of wonder The flavours of our native ingredients are also an amazing untapped resource. Just like our soils, these indigenous ingredients have not been tampered with, they are almost exactly as they were 20,000 years ago. Working with our native ingredients is an opportunity to cook with history – heirloom vegetables and heritage breeds of the utmost purity. Of course, working with Australia’s native ingredients is not without its difficulties. They have not been bred to sit on supermarket shelves, they have not been cross-pollinated to withstand hours, if not days, on trucks traversing the country like modern-day produce.   Vic Cherikoff, author of Wild Foods, looks to the quandong to illustrate this point: “It’s a fruit that can be picked over a five- or six-week period off the same tree, requiring at least three or four visits to complete the harvest. They will be over-ripe in a matter of days, with the blue quandang it’s over-ripe in a matter of hours.” Most of these native ingredients are not commercially grown. Furthermore, many of these ingredients thrive in parts of arid Australia that have been largely ignored by modern industry, meaning transport in and out is difficult and costs are high. Thus, most of these ingredients are only available frozen, dehydrated or in powdered form. Cherikoff, who has been working with native ingredients for decades, has actually made this the central component of his business. He now works with powders and spices to make a powdered supplement rather than try to promote the individual ingredients. “Unfortunately native ingredients suffered some major negativity back in the ’80s and ’90s so without question that has had an impact,” says Zonfrillo. “Secondly, the prices we are seeing   make it impossible for many kitchens to use them, let alone someone at home, and finally, supply is pretty scarce across the board. New directions and directives need to be taken within the native foods industry in Australia in order to make Australian ingredients accessible, affordable and a wanted commodity.” The need for a common goal Not all the roadblocks are natural, in fact, many are bureaucratic. It was only 30-odd years ago that kangaroo meat was first made available for commercial sale. It is now the exception and the rule. Government legislation stipulates that emu, for example, cannot be taken from the wild, but must be farmed, making the fledgling industry almost impossible to get off the ground. Valuing these ingredients is a big part of the problem. For many years, while we were sowing wheat, herding sheep and crushing grapes, there was only one Australian native under cultivation – the macadamia. Even then, we exported the trees to Hawaii, which now produces 95 percent of the world’s macadamia needs. We spend billions every year on research and development for the wheat and cattle industries of Australia (among many other foreign food items), and leave our native produce to flounder. Zonfrillo has his own plan for this, setting up the Orana Foundation. “Over the years we have been able to assist communities in setting up micro businesses, mainly in wild harvest. Wild food is a commodity which we are not only happy to trade in, but also to understand and tell our customers the story of an ingredient, its history, traditional uses and its cultural significance to the land from which it came,” explains Zonfrillo. “The Foundation will continue this work on a much larger scale, touching more communities, more people, more opportunities while ensuring we collate and document as much of the historic information together. We have many projects awaiting funding from both government and philanthropists, which will commence this year, enabling us to do the most important part – give back.” Culinary identity as a tourist driver is a familiar concept. The arrival of Rene Redzepi and the Noma team to our shores, a collaboration between Tourism Australia, Lendlease and the Noma team, has required significant government investment. Their mission was to cook with indigenous ingredients. “We couldn’t have created Noma Australia if we had not travelled this vast country,” says Redzepi. “You need to meet the people who are harvesting, growing, catching, foraging your food. Once you meet them, and you understand their work, you start planning what flavours you want. “On my many trips around Australia I’ve seen a larder that is so foreign to me. Foraging for abalone, eating fresh muntries, nibbling on pepper berries and cracking open a bunya nut – these experiences are so wild compared to what we’re used to in Europe. Spending time with indigenous communities in places like Arnhem Land have left the biggest impact on me and the Noma team.” It will be interesting to see the impact of Noma Australia, and another foreign chef, on our local palates. It would not be a wild leap to suggest many of these ingredients are as foreign to Australians as they have been to the Danes. The identity we deserve Redzepi’s restaurant in Copenhagen is widely considered the best in the world. However, it was his vision for the restaurant that is particularly interesting. Redzepi is almost solely responsible for turning Copenhagen’s culinary glance inwards, a move that eventually led to the world glancing (glaring) in their direction. Alex Atala of D.O.M. in Brazil has done likewise, while Magnus Nilsson of Favikan has literally written the book on it for Sweden. Their focus on local ingredients has meant more than the success of their restaurants, it has resulted in an interest in their country’s cuisine (and culture) from all corners of the globe. This is not a new phenomenon. In the 1600s the French began to fear their economic dependence on the spice route. To tackle this they made a decision to turn their cuisine inwards, promoting the ingredients from their own backyard over the foreign spices. The result was not just to loosen the grip of the spice trade, but the creation of a French identity, a symbol that has endured for centuries. We can, in part, thank the spice trade for the ubiquitous French restaurant. This could be the revolution we are seeing in Australia now. It’s a big deal, because it has the potential to shine a positive light on the culinary culture of indigenous Australia. It is an opportunity to celebrate knowledge and build respect; an opportunity to build a culinary identity for Australia that includes all Australians. It’s about time.
Food
Christmas food and wine matching guide
Planning your Christmas Day feast shouldn’t be a chore, so to make it a breeze we’ve put together this easy to follow Christmas food and wine matching guide. Matching wine and food is as much about personal taste as anything else, and you may have your own family traditions, however some tried and tested pairings can be a good way to ensure your Christmas Day is one to remember. Read below for our tips and start planning your most delicious Christmas yet! Poultry Turkey If you were enjoying it entirely on its own, roast turkey would be one of the easiest ingredients in the world to match. You could drink your favourite white, red, rosé or even sparkling wine with it and it would work fine. When turkey is served with a number of different accompaniments it can be a little complex to match wines to. With full-flavoured, fruity, spicy stuffing, tart cranberry sauce and an array of vegetables there are a lot of different flavours to take in, so choose something full and fruity that can stand up to so many flavours. Turkey is medium weight so any white wine needs to have the body to match and this is why Chardonnay , Viognier and Pinot Gris are a great – all three are fuller-bodied dry whites with richer flavours. Turkey is also lower in fat (hence why it needs basting), so it needs a wine with bright fruit and low level of tannin. Smooth, fresh and juicy wines like Grenache, Shiraz Viognier and Pinot Noir make great partners or if you’re in the mood for bubbles try a Sparkling red! Chicken Oaked Chardonnay is a blissful match with a simple roast chicken and also a good choice if the chicken is seasoned with tarragon or served with a creamy sauce. If you have a slightly spicy stuffing or one with fruit like apricots in it, a rich white wine like Viognier is a good choice. As for reds, Pinot Noir is a good choice for chicken served with its own juices or with truffles, and the generous sweetness of a Grenache is perfect if the chicken is accompanied with a traditional meaty gravy. Goose If you’ve decided to serve goose rather than turkey this Christmas you’ve already decided to be adventurous. So you could arguably be adventurous with your choice of drink too. Goose is more strongly flavoured than turkey and is more like game but quite a bit fattier which means it’s essential to look for a wine that has a fair level of acidity. Pinot Noir offers a fantastic pairing, but select one with some sweet, silky fruit. Baked glazed ham Baked glazed ham has three things to contend with – the saltiness, the spice of the glaze, and the fat content. A sweet glaze needs a ripe and fruity wine with juicy fruit flavours to offset the saltiness of the ham.   Riesling with its lime cordial flavours, Rose´ with raspberry nuances or the lemon curd flavours of Semillon all work well (think of the classic ham and pineapple combination – salty and sweet). If you prefer reds choose wines with a lot of fruit and not too much tannin. Ripe reds like Merlot and Shiraz are plump and rich with red and black fruits that compliment the spice of the glaze and offset the salt. Seafood Citrus fruits are a natural accompaniment to seafood – the acidity offsets the richness of seafood and the sweetness compliments their delicate flavours. White wines such as Riesling , Semillon and Vermentino are all perfect matches because of their citrus flavours, mouth-watering and energetic acidity. Fresh prawns have a delicate flavour so the wine should simply act like a squeeze of lemon hence Semillon with its fine, piercing acidity and lemon flavour, is the perfect accompaniment. Young, crisp Vermentino goes well with so many fish dishes, as well as oysters, raw shellfish and cold, seafood antipasti. Dry Rieslings from the Clare and Eden Valley have a distinctive limey twist that makes them a particularly good match for spicy seafood dishes. Or why not serve an entrée of smoked salmon with Champagne or Sauvignon Blanc for a match made in heaven. Dessert Christmas pudding There is an argument that you don't need anything to drink with the classic Christmas pudding, especially if you've flamed it with brandy or served it with a brandy sauce, but if you fancy a small glass of something sweet and delicious, a dessert wine with a touch of orange or apricot such as late harvest or botrytis-affected wine make the perfect match. Mince pies Mince pies are very much like Christmas pudding and Christmas cake so you could drink much the same sort of wine with them. But tradition obviously plays a part in terms of what most people expect and they do pair particularly well with fortified wines like Tokay, sweet Sherry or Madeira. Trifle For a trifle with jelly, custard and cream, a sweeter style, spritzy wine perfect. If it is a classic Sherry trifle, depending on how much is already added to it, sherry is obviously an option.
Two Blues Sauvignon Blanc 2014
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