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Food

Colin Fassnidge Poached Pork Fillet with Pearl Barley and Wilted Greens recipe

Preparation time
10 minutes
Cooking time
70 minutes
Serves
4

A rich white or medium weight red would be great with this dish. Our featured Grenache from Barossa's Z Wine is busting with fresh red and blue fruits, light confectionary notes and touches of fresh herb and spice. It is deliciously soft and textural

Ingredients

  • 400g pork fillet
  • 2 pork fillets
  • 200g cooked pearl barley
  • 1 onion, roughly chopped
  • 1 bulb garlic, sliced in half
  • 1 knob ginger, microplaned
  • 3 star anise 
  • 1 cinnamon quill 
  • 100ml white wine
  • 500ml ham hock stock
  • Soy sauce, to season 
  • 8 king brown mushrooms
  • 16 swiss mushrooms 
  • Juice of 1 lime
  • 2 lime leaves
  • Garnish: shard leaves and sorrel

Method:

  1. In a pan, sweat off onions, garlic, ginger, star anise, cinnamon.
  2. Deglaze the pan with the white wine, add hock stock and simmer for 30 minutes.
  3. Add soy sauce to season, add pork fillet and mushrooms.
  4. Remove pot from heat and allow to sit for 20 mins – or until 58ºC at centre of pork fillet (it should be light pink in the middle).
  5. Remove pork, strain stock and bring it back to the boil. Add lime juice and leaves.
  6. Slice pork, arrange on top of barley in bowl, add mushrooms. Garnish with shard and sorrel. Pour over hot stock and serve.

Wine match: Z Wines Roman Grenache Shiraz Mataro 2013

Food
Preparation time
10 minutes
Cooking time
70 minutes
Serves
4

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Two Blues Sauvignon Blanc 2014
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