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Food

Heather Jeong’s Daeji bulgogi (Korean spicy pork) Recipe

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Another great dish to enjoy with a mid-weight, GSM-style, however, it would also be delicious with a mouth-watering Pinot, such as the Red Claw Pinot Noir 2016 from the Mornington Peninsula which pairs beautifully with the savoury spice in this dish, but isn’t overpowered. 
 

INGREDIENTS

500g sliced pork belly or pork neck

Marinade
3 cloves garlic, finely minced
1 tsp ginger, finely minced
2 green onions, chopped
2-3 tbsp kochujang (Korean chilli paste)
1-2 tbsp soy sauce
½ tbsp kochugaru (Korean chilli powder)
2 tbsp sugar
2 tbsp cooking sake
1 tbsp mirin
2 tbsp sesame oil
½ tsp ground black pepper
Rice, lettuce leaves, kaettnip (wild sesame leaves) and kimchee, to serve

METHOD

1. Combine marinade ingredients in a glass or ceramic dish. Add pork, turn to coat. Marinate pork for several hours or overnight in the fridge.
2. Heat a non-stick frying pan, BBQ or grill pan on high heat. Add pork in batches, fry for 10 minutes, turning occasionally, or until cooked to your liking. Serve with rice, lettuce leaves, kaettnip and kimchee.

Notes: Sliced pork belly or pork neck is stored in the freezer section of Asian groceries. Fresh sliced pork belly is sold only in Korean butchers. Kochujang (Korean chilli paste) is now sold in most supermarkets in red plastic tubs. Kaettnip is only available in Korean grocery stores. Marinated meat can be portioned and frozen for later use. You can also add vegetables like sliced onions and carrots towards the end of cooking time.

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