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Food

Lyndey Milan’s Asian-style mushroom omelette

Preparation time
10 Minutes
Cooking time
10 Minutes
Serves
4

INGREDIENTS

¼ cup (60ml) peanut oil

200g button mushrooms, sliced

2 cloves garlic, chopped

4 green onions, white & some green,
thinly sliced on angle

1 bunch baby bok choy, leaves separated, washed

8 large eggs

2–3 small red chillies, deseeded,
finely chopped

¼ tsp fish sauce

1 tsp sesame oil

1 tbsp soy sauce

80g snow pea sprouts, trimmed

1 red chilli, sliced

1 tbsp fried shallots

Kecap manis, to serve

METHOD

1. Heat 2 teaspoons peanut oil in a non-stick wok. Add the mushrooms, garlic and green onions and stir-fry for 2–3 minutes or until just soft. Transfer to a bowl. Wipe out with paper towel.

2. Dry bok choy. Heat 2 teaspoons oil in same wok and stir-fry bok choy for 2–3 minutes or until just tender. Transfer to a bowl. Wipe out with paper towel.

3. Break eggs into a large measuring jug. Add chillies, fish sauce, sesame oil and soy sauce. Whisk together with a fork. You should have 500ml.

4. Heat a wok over high heat. Add 1 tablespoon peanut oil. Swirl to coat up the side of the wok. Pour in a quarter of the egg mixture (250ml). Swirl to cover base and run approx. 6cm up the side. Cook for 30 seconds or until base is set. Tilt wok to allow any uncooked egg to run to edge. Sprinkle half the mushroom mixture and bok choy over one side of the omelette. Fold omelette in half. Cook for 30 seconds. Transfer to a plate. Cover to keep warm. Repeat to make remaining omelettes with remaining egg and mushroom mixtures.

5. Fold omelettes in half and place on plates. Top with snow pea sprouts, chilli and fried shallots. Serve immediately with kecap manis.

Food
Preparation time
10 Minutes
Cooking time
10 Minutes
Serves
4

Wine match

Frankland Estate Netley Road Vineyard Riesling 2012
$34.00
in any 12
$36.00
in any 6
$40.00
each
Price | options
$34.00
in any 12 bottles
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Two Blues Sauvignon Blanc 2014
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