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Food

Lyndey Milan’s Chocolate and raspberry brownies

Preparation time
10 mins
Cooking time
30–35mins
Serves
12

INGREDIENTS

200g good quality dark eating chocolate, chopped coarsely

125g cold butter, chopped

2 tbsp raspberry jam

½ cup (110g) brown sugar

2 eggs, beaten lightly

1 cup (150g) plain flour

125g raspberries, fresh or frozen

Cocoa powder or icing sugar, for dusting

 

METHOD

1. Preheat oven to 180°C (160°C fan-forced). Grease and line a 19cm square deep cake pan with baking paper.

2. Combine butter and chocolate in large saucepan or microwave safe container; stir over very low heat until melted. Remove from heat.

3. Stir in raspberry jam, sugar, then eggs one at a time. Stir in sifted flour, then gently fold in the raspberries. Spread mixture into prepared pan.

4. Bake for 30–35 minutes or until the brownie is firm to touch. Cool in pan.

5. Cut into squares. Dust with sifted cocoa
or icing sugar, if desired.

Lyndey’s note: butter and chocolate can be melted in the microwave. This recipe can be made four days ahead.

Food
Preparation time
10 mins
Cooking time
30–35mins
Serves
12

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