The maximum quantity permitted for this item is , if you wish to purchase more please call 1300 303 307

Lyndey Milan’s Middle Eastern vegetable tart

Preparation time
15 mins
Cooking time
50 mins

You could easily pair a number of different wines with the tart, however, why not keep it ‘local’ and open a Tempranillo. This issue’s 2015 example from First Creek is ideal. Medium weight, dry and savoury, it has a slightly meaty note, some raspberry and vanilla characters and loads of sweet oak.
A great all-rounder with Mediterranean and Middle Eastern food.


1 red capsicum

2 small eggplant

1 red onion

1 small head garlic, separated into
cloves, peeled

3 tsp ground cumin

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

1/3 cup (80ml) extra virgin olive oil

½ cup (130g) good quality hummous

1 ½ tsp sumac

4 lamb tenderloins (optional)

150g feta

Flatleaf parsley leaves


Olive oil pastry

3 cups (480g) wholemeal plain flour

1 ½ tsp salt

¾ cup (180ml) cold water

½ cup (125ml) extra virgin olive oil


1. Preheat the oven to 200°C
(180°C fan-forced) and line two
large baking trays with baking paper.

2. For the vegetables: chop capsicum, eggplant and onion into 2cm dice. Tumble onto one of the prepared tray with garlic cloves, sprinkle with 2 teaspoons cumin, season with salt and pepper, drizzle with
¼ cup (60ml) olive oil and toss to ensure
all are coated. Roast for 20 minutes or until the vegetables are cooked through, tossing the vegetables after 10 minutes to ensure even cooking.

3. For the pastry: combine the flour and salt in a large bowl. Make a well in the centre and add the oil and cold water. Using one hand, quickly mix the ingredients together just until they form a ball. Place the ball on the prepared tray and, using your fingers, push the dough into a wide round shape, 35 cm diameter. It should be 5 mm thick. Using your thumb and pointer finger, press the pastry edges to form an edge of around 1 cm. If desired, flute this edge using your fingers. Bake for 10 minutes.

4. To finish: remove pastry from oven and spread with hummous, top with roasted vegetables and sprinkle with sumac. After 10 minutes, coat lamb tenderloins with salt, pepper and remaining olive oil and place in oven on a paper-lined baking tray for 8 minutes. Remove to rest. Crumble feta over the tart and return to oven for a final 12 minutes (30 minutes in total). If the vegetables and cheese are browning too much, cover with a sheet of aluminium foil.

5. To serve, place lamb fillets over tart (if using), sprinkle with parsley and serve immediately.

Preparation time
15 mins
Cooking time
50 mins

Wine match

First Creek Tempranillo 2015
in any 12
in any 6
Price | options
in any 12 bottles


You might also like

Manu Feidel's Bastille Day Celebrations
French-born celebrity chef Manu Feildel celebrates Bastille Day in Australia with an indulgent French menu. Bastille Day is the most important date on the French calendar. July 14 celebrates the famous storming of the Bastille, a military stronghold, by restless Parisians in 1789, who feared France’s progression from a Feudal society to a constitution was being compromised. Although it was a relatively small battle, it had large repercussions and under a month later, Feudalism was abolished and a Declaration of Rights was proclaimed. In 1790, exactly one year after the storming of the Bastille, the Fête de la Fédération was held to celebrate the unity of the French nation. A mass was held and then Parisians partied, enjoying a huge feast with wine, fireworks and some even ran naked through the streets in a display of their freedom! Celebrations Today’s Bastille Day celebrations are more commemorative with the pomp and ceremony of a military parade down the Champs-Élysées, under the Arc de Triomphe and to the Place de la Concorde. For the French people, it is very much a holiday in the middle of summer, a chance to celebrate their nation, have some time with their family and of course, feast. “It’s a little bit like New Year’s Eve in Sydney”, says French-born, Sydney based celebrity chef Manu Feildel. “There is a party atmosphere, fireworks, street parties. It is in the middle of summer holidays, so families are often on their summer breaks, so they enjoy the day together. It is a great traditional public holiday and everyone is in a party mood!” Being in the middle of summer, Manu says there are no traditional dishes as there are at Christmas or Easter, but there would always be a special, often indulgent meal with family and friends. “People would buy the best meats and ingredients to create a luxury feast,” says Manu. “When I had my restaurants here in Australia, we would always organise a special meal for Bastille Day and the staff and I would dress up for the guests.” “In France, the dishes would be more summery salads and seafoods. Of course, over here it is winter, so I have created an indulgent meal fit for Bastille Day celebrations in Australia.” Manu’s Bastille Day recipes “Because Bastille Day here in Australia is in the middle of winter, I wanted to start the meal with a warm dish, comfort food, so I have gone with a chestnut soup,” says Manu. “In the old days, every meal would start with a pottage (soup), so this is very traditional, and fitting for the start of a Bastille Day feast. “The next dish is a very indulgent dish of tuna rostini with foie gras and truffle. Beef rostini is a very traditional French dish, but here I wanted to add an Australian twist, so I changed it to tuna. “The main is pan-roasted duck with celeriac puree and cherry and Pinot Noir sauce. In my mind, duck is always considered expensive, so this dish makes me think of a king eating, so it’s the perfect meat for a celebratory meal. “For the dessert, I did bring a little French history. Apparently Louis XV named this tiny pastry ‘Madeleine’ in 1755 in honour of his father-in-law’s pastry cook, Madeleine Paulmier. Louis’ wife introduced the Madeleines soon afterwards to the court in Versaillles and they became loved all over France. They are also the perfect petit four, for coffee and chocolate, to end the meal.” Manu Feildel's Bastille Day Celebration feast Chestnut soup with parsnip and parmesan crisps Tuna rostini with foie gras and truffle Pan roasted duck with celeriac puree and cherry & Pinot Noir sauce Madeleines with chocolate cherry sauce & candied orange praline
Jamie Oliver - cooking up a revolution
Words by Mark Hughes on 26 Jan 2017
Jamie Oliver admits he questions reality when he is centre stage at places like the World Health Assembly giving a speech on global nutrition or in the inner sanctum of British Parliament planning the obesity strategy with the Prime Minister. “It’s absolutely nuts,” he tells me down the phoneline from the UK. “To make it even worse, everyone listens, but  I  still feel like the naked chef." It is admirable, but why him? Why has Jamie felt the need to change the way we eat? Why has he became the flag bearer for the food revolution? Responsibility and right place, right time is only part of it. Happily married, he and wife Jools have recently welcomed their fifth child, River, into their lives. “It is brilliant and amazing and we are very thankful,” he says of his newborn son. “Sunday, I looked around the table and everyone was around it and I just went, ‘Bloody hell, how did this happen?’ I know how it happened...but you know…” And there’s the answer. Every parent knows, as does any responsible adult. For Jamie, it's about giving children the nutrition they need to be the best they can be. All this starts with education. Kids, adults, governments; everyone. Life Changes to Eating Australia and Britain are up there with the USA in adult obesity rates. How has this happened in just three short decades? “People always find a way to shortcut,” reasons Jamie. “And the minute they find a way to make time on a job, they fill it up with other stuff. Technology has really added to that. Everyone is juggling more things, more money and more responsibilities – life has just changed. “The reality of it is 56% of Aussies are overweight or obese and health problems are shooting through the roof because of it. And this is at the same time we have more knowledge and beautiful produce. But it comes down to two things: knowing how to cook and access to good food.” Jamie’s plethora of cookbooks and cooking shows is helping solve the first issue. But he’s gone above that, setting up initiatives such as The Ministry of Food, a hands-on community cooking school, The Kitchen Garden Project to introduce growing food and cooking into schools, as well as being part of The Obesity Strategy, Sugar Smart UK, and the list goes on.
Look at What you Serve The second part of the solution – access to good food – is getting people to look at the produce they eat. In short, it’s about more fruit, veg, nuts, seeds and beans. “I just spent two years going around the world to where people live the longest,” says Jamie. “These places are not rich, they are not scientists or nutritionists – they just happen to be good at cooking food that is delicious and really good for you. And it is pretty much vegetarian. They eat meat and fish, but really only twice a week. “Take Korea, for instance. I sat down at a table where there were 10 plates of noodles, heaps of veg – steamed, stir-fried, pickled, fermented – colour everywhere, and then a plate of meat. By default, that is super balanced, super healthy.” The thing is, Jamie knows his stuff. Alongside over two decades of cooking, he has been studying nutrition for the past four years. A full diploma. As a consequence, each recipe in his most recent cookbooks has nutritional information such as calories, fats, protein and carbs, plus special sections offering healthy tips and ways to balance your meals. “Nutrition can be very technical, very scientific,” says Jamie. “So I have tried hard to build bridges between science and understanding it in the real world.” Still the Same Guy All of this seems far removed from the knockabout chef that burst onto our TV screens all those years ago.“I often think the Naked Chef did well in Aussie because, back in the day, my attitude was all about having a laugh and using food to make cool memories and I think that’s very Australian. To a certain degree, nothing has changed. I am inspired by the same things. The food that made me tick, still makes me tick. “But I have always been driven by what people want and these days people ask, what is balance? What does ‘good food’ look like? So the point of books like  Super Food Family Classics  is to create something where every choice is a good choice. “It isn’t about getting it right all the time. Personally, I try to eat to the principles of the book, Monday to Friday lunch. That’s how I do it. And then, guess what? Friday night, I don’t even think about it – the whisky is out, I am planning the weekend, I am getting amongst it. Everyone will find their own pattern, but that generally puts me in a good place.”
Two Blues Sauvignon Blanc 2014
1 case has been added to your cart.
Cart total: xxx
1 case, 12 bottles, 3 accessories