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Food

Lyndey Milan’s smoked salmon souffles

Preparation time
20 Minutes
Cooking time
18-25 Minutes
Serves
6

Being so delicate and refined, the soufflés could easily be overpowered with a wine that’s too rich. We recommend a youthful Semillon like the 2017 Synergy from Andrew Thomas Wines. It’s ripe yet so crisp, with mouth-watering acidity and the classic quinine-like layer so prized in the variety. 
A delicious match!

INGREDIENTS

40g butter
3 green onions (shallots), finely sliced
25g plain flour
300ml milk
100g gruyere cheese, grated
1 tbsp chopped chives or dill
3 large eggs, separated
100g smoked salmon, chopped or smoked salmon off cuts
Zest ½ lemon

To serve
100g smoked salmon
Dill sprigs or chives, to garnish

METHOD

1. Melt butter in a saucepan over medium heat and cook green onions for a few minutes until soft. Whisk in flour and combine. Slowly add milk, whisking until thickened. Whisk in cheese and herbs, season to taste.
2. Heat oven to 200ºC. Butter 6 x 150ml 
(3/4 cup) soufflé dishes. Whisk the egg yolks into the sauce, then the chopped salmon and lemon zest. Whisk the egg whites until firm, then carefully fold half the mixture into the salmon mix. Fold in the remaining egg white. Spoon into the dishes, level off the top with a palate knife and run your finger around in between the soufflé mix and the ramekin.  Place in a baking dish and add enough boiling water to come halfway up the sides 
of the ramekins. Cook  for 18–25 minutes until risen and golden. 
3. Quickly top each with a piece of salmon and a chive or dill sprig. Serve with rocket leaves, if desired.
Lyndey’s Note: You can just cook soufflés for 15 minutes, then refrigerate or freeze. When ready to serve, thaw in fridge, turn out of their dishes, and place on squares of baking paper. Top with a teaspoon each of crème fraîche and bake for 10-15 minutes at 200ºC until the soufflés start to puff up.

Food
Preparation time
20 Minutes
Cooking time
18-25 Minutes
Serves
6

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