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Food

Mark Olive’s Baked wattleseed cheesecake

Preparation time
Cooking time
Serves
4-6

Ingredients

  • 1 packet sweet biscuits
  • 150g melted butter
  • 250g ricotta cheese
  • 150g cottage cheese
  • 2 tsp lemon or lime rind
  • 1 tbsp semolina
  • 2 tbsps buttermilk
  • 3 eggs (separated)
  • 2 tbsp wattleseed
  • ¾ cup caster sugar
  • Icing sugar to serve

Method

  1. Pre-heat oven to 180°C.
  2. Crush biscuits in a large bowl. Slowly incorporate the butter and mix to combine.
  3. Press into the base of a lightly greased 24 cm spring form tin, chill until firm.
  4. To make the filling, beat the cheeses, rind, semolina, buttermilk, egg yolks and wattleseed with an electric mixer.
  5. In a separate bowl, beat the egg whites, slowly adding the sugar until it forms soft peaks.
  6. Fold the egg whites into the cheese mixture to combine. Pour mixture over biscuit base and bake in oven for 1 hour.
Food
Preparation time
Cooking time
Serves
4-6

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Two Blues Sauvignon Blanc 2014
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