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The Top 5 BYO Restaurants in Perth

Here are the best BYO restaurants in Perth and the wines you should take along with you.

Looking for the perfect restaurant to take your favourite wine to in Perth? To find out where you should enjoy your favourite drops, we asked a local Perth foodie and wine blogger, two of our favourite West Australian winemakers and Dave Mavor from the Wine Selectors Tasting Panel.

Viet Hoa

Could this be the best Vietnamese in Perth?

Recommended by Ryan Gibbs, owner and viticulturist at Aylesbury Estate

“Viet Hoa is one of those Perth icons that never disappoints. Pairing tasty, traditional Vietnamese with fast and friendly service is perfect for a casual dinner with a nice glass of Geographe wine. The Pho is great, as is the shaking beef salad, which is loaded with fresh herbs and lemongrass making it great with a crisp and citrussy Aylesbury Sauvignon Blanc.”

Corkage: free

Unit 1, 349 William St, Northbridge

Visit the Viet Hoa website

Dough Pizza

Inspired by the pizzerias in Naples, this Italian pizza shop in Northbridge serves up traditional wood fired pizza.

Recommended by Casey, wine blogger at The Traveling Corkscrew

“It's no surprise pizza is the specialty at Dough. I always like to take a nice bottle of Prosecco with me, as the refreshing crispness of the bubbles complement the thin, crispy wood-fired bases and the stringy mozzarella on the pizzas perfectly. If you are more of a fan of red, then a wine made from Sangiovese or Nero d’Avola would be a great choice. My philosophy when it comes to international cuisine and wine matching is to stick with their local wines (if possible), or wines made from grape varieties that originate from their shores to ensure a tasty match.”

Corkage: $6.50 per bottle 

434A William St, Perth 6000

Visit the Dough Pizza website

Uncle Billy’s

This Perth institution has served tasty Chinese until the early hours for many years and is the perfect place to bring along a crisp Western Australian Riesling.

Recommended by Dave Mavor, Wine Selectors Tasting Panelist and Wine Show Judge

“Whenever the Wine Selectors team is in town to run masterclasses at the Good Food & Wine Show, or to explore the many world class wine regions of WA, we always end up at Uncle Billy’s for late (sometimes very late) night Chinese. Often we have a few winemakers with us, who have brought their favourite Margaret River Chardonnay or Great Southern Riesling to pair with the great live seafood, congee or claypot dishes on the menu. While a crisp white wine is generally a good idea for Chinese food, lower tannin, fruit-focused reds like Pinot Noir, Merlot and Grenache can pair perfectly with richer, less spicy dishes like sweet & sour, chao zhou style duck and sizzling satay.”

Corkage: $6.00 per bottle

9/66 Roe St, Northbridge

Visit the Uncle Billy’s website

Bistro Felix Wine

Charming French bistro and wine bar that hosts weekly BYO Cellar Nights.

Recommended by Michael Ng, senior winemaker at Ironcloud Wines

“Bistro Felix is a superb restaurant with quality food and impeccable service. They have an impressively large wine list sourced from around the world, but if you’d like to bring along a special bottle you’ve been saving for a special occasion, then their BYO Cellar Nights, held every Tuesday, are the perfect chance. I might be biased, but I think the Ironcloud Cabernet Malbec 2014 is the perfect choice to go toe-to-toe with their rich, French inspired menu.”

Corkage: $12 per bottle (Tuesday only)

118-120 Rokeby Rd, Subiaco

Visit the Bistro Felix website

Royal India 

A first class Indian restaurant with top notch service and food.

Recommended by Casey, wine blogger at The Traveling Corkscrew

“This West Perth curry house love their tandoori! I like to take a nice bottle of Pinot Noir with me when dining at Royal India, as the fruity and savoury elegance in the wine works well with the plentiful spices in the dishes. However, it you're more of a fan of white wine, then an off-dry Gewürztraminer, Riesling or Müller-Thurgau would be ideal choices. Corkage is more like a first-class wine service at Royal India – the staff will take care of pouring your vino (they'll make sure your glass is never empty!) and they use lovely Plumm glassware to ensure your wine is showing at its upmost best.”

Corkage: $10 per bottle (Sunday to Thursday only)

1134 Hay St, West Perth 6005

Visit the Royal India website 

For more Perth restaurant ideas make sure you visit Casey's very comprehensive Perth BYO restaurant list. Or, if you're heading to Melbourne or Sydney then check-out our Melbourne and Sydney BYO restaurant articles.

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Two Blues Sauvignon Blanc 2014
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