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Food

Zumbo’s salty chocolate buns

Preparation time
Cooking time
Serves

INGREDIENTS

Sable a Choux
300g brown sugar
300g butter
350g flour

Choux pastry 
400g butter
20g sugar
430g water
540g milk
732g eggs
20g salt
540g flour

Milk chocolate crème chantilly
500g cream
280g milk chocolate couverture

Praline centre
300g toasted whole hazelnuts
200g caster sugar
1 vanilla bean
2g sea salt

 

 

METHOD

1. Place all ingredients in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with a beater attachment; begin mixing on a slow speed until the ingredients are just combined. Increase the speed to medium and mix for 2 minutes.
2. Gather the dough together and place on a sheet of plastic wrap, flatten the dough to approximately 2cm and wrap in plastic film. Place in the refrigerator for 2 hours or until the dough has firmed up.
3. Lightly flour your work bench, roll the dough out to a thickness of 3mm. Using a 6cm round cutter, stamp out 12 discs.

Choux pastry 

1. Preheat the oven to 210°C
2. Lightly grease 2–3 oven trays and set aside. Combine the butter, water, sugar, milk and salt in a large heavy-based saucepan and bring to the boil. Remove from the heat and using a wooden spoon quickly beat in the flour. Return to heat and continue beating until the mixture comes together and leaves the side of the pan. Cook, stirring, over low heat for 1–2 minutes to cook the flour. Remove from heat and allow to cool slightly. 
3. Place the mixture in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with a beater attachment; beat the mixture to release any more heat. Gradually add the eggs, one at a time. Beat well between each addition until all the eggs have been added and the mixture is thick and glossy – a spoon should stand upright in it. Beat for several more minutes, or until thickened. 
4. Spoon the mixture, in batches, into a piping bag fitted with a 12–15mm nozzle. Cover remaining choux paste with cling film. Pipe mixture onto trays about 5cm x 2.5cm high, leaving room for spreading. Place a disc of the Sable a Choux on top. Bake for 25–30 minutes, in batches, or until firm and hollow when tapped. Transfer choux balls to 
a wire rack.

Milk chocolate crème chantilly

1. Place the chocolate and cream in a saucepan. Bring to the boil, stirring constantly. Refrigerate.

Praline centre

1. Cook the sugar and vanilla until a dry caramel is reached and a dark amber colour is achieved. Add skinless toasted whole hazelnuts and salt, stir well. Spread onto a tray lined with baking paper or silicon mat. Leave to cool and then process to a paste in a food processor (add a little oil if needed). Pour into a small mould or ice cube trays and freeze.

Assembly
1. Cut the choux ball in half. Pipe in the milk chocolate crème chantilly. De-mould a praline centre and place in the centre of the piped crème chantilly, pipe more on top to seal. Then place choux pastry lid on top to finish.

 

 

Food
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De Bortoli 375ml Noble One Botrytis Semillon 2014
$39.95
in any 12
$42.30
in any 6
$46.99
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$39.95
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Words by Libby Travers on 12 Sep 2018
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