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Life

Haigh’s Chocolates – a legacy of quality

Over 100 years ago, Alfred Haigh had grand plans for his new business, but he never would have dreamed of the love the world has developed for his family’s chocolate. 

While wine-lovers know South Australia as the home of multi-generational family-owned wineries – Yalumba, Henschke, d’Arenberg, to name a few – for chocolate lovers, the state is synonymous with the multi-generational Haigh family.

Today, Haigh’s is in the hands of the fourth generation and in 2015 celebrated its centenary – one of only a few Australian enterprises to have family maintained continuity for 100 years.

Beehive Beginnings

The first Haigh’s store opened in Adelaide’s historic Beehive Building in 1915, the dream of Alfred Haigh. Having been a confectioner’s shop, the business came with the former owner’s equipment, moulds, recipes and books – everything a budding self-taught confectioner needed to perfect his craft.

Following Alf was his son, Claude, who kept the business humming through the trials of the Depression and war years, while also establishing a name in the thoroughbred racing industry.

The 1950s saw Claude’s son John take over after a stint working at Lindt & Sprüngli in Switzerland. This experience was invaluable for both John and Haigh’s, as on his return, he set about revamping the family’s chocolate-making operations.

John has been succeeded by his sons, Alister and Simon, who continue the family tradition of producing premium chocolate and expanding the company’s retail network, selling Haigh’s products all over Australia.

A caring approach

With an eye to Haigh’s continuing well into the future, the family is committed to the environment and sustainability. As such, 80% of its cocoa beans are UTZ-certified, which ensures traceability back to the grower and a fair return for producers and improving the lives of the farming community. The family also prides itself on its cultural, philanthropic and conservation work.

So next time you’re savouring a Haigh’s truffle, relishing an Easter bilby or luxuriating in their Original Fruit Chocolates, consider the legacy of quality behind every bite.

View the range instore or at haighschocolates.com.au

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The Essential Chocolate and Wine Pairing Guide
When you want a go-to guide for wine and chocolate pairing, here’s what you really need to know – simply put, chocolate is delicious; wine is delicious; eating chocolate while drinking wine is doubly delicious. Matching wine with chocolate is all about balance. While there are several factors to consider, finding the right balance needn’t be complicated; simply look at the most obvious characters of both the wine and the chocolate – are they rich, light, full-flavoured, bitter, dry or sweet? Here’s a brief overview to help you find your new favourite matches. Wine and Chocolate Pairing – an Infographic Guide Dark/Bittersweet Chocolate Dark chocolates with 70% to 100% cacao are the most intense. They are richly flavoured and feature a combination of roasted, fruity, earthy, woody, ashy or nutty notes. Wines that are good matches to bittersweet styles will also match with semisweet chocolate. With intense flavours, dark and bittersweet chocolates usually call for bolder, denser and fuller-bodied red wines that have more concentrated fruit notes. They’re also delicious served with a vintage Tawny Port. Cabernet Sauvignon and dark chocolate usually work well together, and if there was to be one generic chocolate and wine suggestion, it would be this one. Because Cabernet Sauvignon is generally full-bodied, it needs to be matched with intense flavours, so turning up the cocoa content in the chocolate is key. The fruit intensity and medium to full bodied nature of Shiraz make for a rich and mouth-filling combination. The key is starting with a chocolate with over 50% cocoa content and matching the general fruit flavours of the wine to a complementary chocolate flavour. Grenache matches well with heavier chocolates as it has good sweet fruit weight and is low in tannins which can balance out the bitterness of dark chocolate. Suggested varietal matches: Cabernet Sauvignon , Grenache , Malbec , Merlot , Tawny Port , Shiraz , and Zinfandel Milk Chocolate Milk chocolate has a smaller percentage of cacao and a higher percentage of sugar. This factor, plus the milk content means it’s milder, and sweeter with flavours including brown sugar, cocoa, vanilla, honey, caramel, milk, cream, nutty and/or malt. Milk chocolate pairs nicely with lighter, fruiter and lower alcohol reds or try a fortified wine such as Muscat or Tokay – its butterscotch, toffee and nutty nuances highlight milk chocolate’s nutty and caramel notes and enhance the overall flavour. If you’re partial to aged Sparkling reds, their complex savoury characters make them perfect for desserts and flavoured chocolates. Suggested varietal matches: Muscat, Tokay , and aged Sparkling reds . White Chocolate Even though it is referred to as white chocolate, this style technically isn’t a true chocolate as it doesn’t include cocoa, but cocoa butter, sugar and milk solids. Its sweet flavours of cream, milk, honey, vanilla, caramel or fruit makes it quite a versatile pair with wine. A delicious match is Australian Moscato which tend to be light aromatic and fruity and often have a slight spritz that lifts and refreshes the palate. The apricot, stonefruit and lychee flavours lend them to finer lighter chocolate, white chocolate and mousses. Late-harvest Riesling has an exotic sweetness that complements the vanilla, caramel and honey flavours of white chocolate, while Gewürztraminer has a slight sweetness plus typical lychee fruit that also makes it a favourite. Suggested varietal matches: Semi-dry Sparkling whites , Gewurtztraminer , Moscato , and Late-harvest Riesling . Discover Your Favourites As each and every one of us has a unique palate, likes and dislikes, the only proven way to find your favourite chocolate and wine match is to experiment and we all know what a tough job that will be. How about sea salt caramel with Prosecco , dark raspberry with a Cabernet , dark orange with a Botrytis Semillon, or dark chilli with a Cabernet Merlot? Chocolate Indulgence
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Haigh’s the Bean to Bar Process
Haigh’s Chocolates source the world’s best cocoa beans to make their famed range of premium chocolate. Often referred to as ‘the food of the Gods’, chocolate is one of the culinary world’s true marvels and it has delighted mankind for centuries. The Olmec people in the southern part of what is now Mexico, the Mayan civilisations and the Aztecs all enjoyed cocoa before introducing it to the Spanish at the start of the 16th century. The actual process of taking the fruit of the cocoa pod and turning it into chocolate has changed very little from those ancient times. Technology has seen advancements in the processing, but the overall process is essentially the same. The bean is removed from the cocoa pod, sun-dried and then transported to a factory where it goes through a series of processes before eventually forming a silky, smooth liquid chocolate – the perfect base to make a range of delicious chocolate products. The best ingredients
At the heart of this process is the fact that the best beans make the best chocolate. Haigh’s Chocolates source premium quality cocoa beans from the best cocoa growing regions around the world.  In 2014, Haigh’s was the first Australian owned chocolate manufacturer to achieve international UTZ certification for the use of ethically and sustainably farmed cocoa beans with 80% of its range UTZ certified. As it endeavours to achieve 100% certification, Haigh’s still leads the way for sustainable production with a supply chain spanning cocoa-growing countries from West Africa to South America.
Haigh’s Chocolates not only sources premium cocoa beans, they also process them in their own factory to make their range of premium chocolate products, which they then sell exclusviely in their own retail stores. This dedication to a true bean-to-bar process means Haigh’s can guarantee the utmost freshness and quality of their chocolate. Venture into a Haigh’s store in Adelaide, Melbourne, Sydney, Canberra or shop online, and sample their delicious products, which includes their limited release Single Origin range. Like wine grapes, cocoa beans have flavour characteristics unique to variety and area of origin. Haigh’s Chocolates Single Origin is made from cocoa beans sourced from a single location. Try one and discover the true bean-to-bar difference. View the range instore or at haighschocolates.com
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Two Blues Sauvignon Blanc 2014
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