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Life

My City Adelaide

Duncan Welgemoed, Chef/co-owner of acclaimed Adelaide restaurant Africola, reveals where he goes to eat, drink and be merry in his hometown.

Having enjoyed a food scene in the 1980s that saw Maggie Beer, Cheong Liew, Phillip Searle, Cath Kerry and Christine Manfield among those rattling the pans, Adelaide is once again at the epicentre of Australian culinary innovation.

Home to a veritable melting pot of fabulous restaurants, the city’s culinary landscape has blossomed, offering loads of different genres, cuisines and price points. Add to that, phenomenal wine from some of the world’s most acclaimed wine regions, where prestigious producers sit alongside cutting edge winemakers, and it’s a perfect storm of creativity.

With so much going on, we turned to Duncan Welgemoed, co-owner and chef of one of Adelaide’s best restaurants, Africola, and Food Consultant for the Adelaide Festival, to take us on a tour of some of his favourite local restaurants, cafes and bars. Of course, when visiting Adelaide, your first stop should be to sample the cool vibes and African-inspired meals at Africola. Here’s Duncan’s list of where to go afterwards.

ORANA

Orana is one of the most unique restaurants in Australia. Jock Zonfrillo and his team have worked tirelessly to create their taste of Australia, with a distinct and direct focus on native ingredients. It’s challenging, interesting, and like no restaurant in the world! Their showcase of Australia’s Indigenous ingredients is second to none.

restaurantorana.com

SUNNY’S PIZZA

Sunny’s is completely different to anything else here, perhaps even in Australia. At once a bar, a pizza shop and, here’s the kicker, it’s also a dance hall. It’s operated by one the young legends of our South Australian bar scene, events guru Andy Noel. Really good booze and wicked DJs.

facebook.com/sunnys.partysize

MAGILL ESTATE – TAKE THE IN-LAWS

Magill Estate is a restaurant hosted in one of Australia’s best wineries, Penfold’s. Simplicity is key, with the food providing the perfect seasoning to the wine, rather than a menu being built the other way around. Pared back luxury. 

magillestaterestaurant.com

HENTLEY FARM – ONE FOR DATE NIGHT

Head chef Lachlin Colwill is South Australia’s silent achiever – I think he’s cooking some of the most ambitious food in the country. Lachlan grew up in the Barossa, and while he’s cooked at some brilliant restaurants in between, he is back on home turf and you can taste it. The team harvests produce from their own farm, but also draws on friends and family in the area. There’s a sense of luxury and yet it remains informal, delicate, with a distinct personality.

hentleyfarm.com.au

EBENEZER PLACE CAFÉS

Situated just behind Rundle Street is a little strip where you could happily spend a whole day bouncing from café to restaurant to bar! This is the essence of what Adelaide’s about with so many brilliant operators doing really super diverse stuff. There’s a symbiosis to their offering that speaks to me about what Adelaide is … what Australia is.

PARWANA – THE KIDS WILL ALSO LOVE IT

This is the best Afghani food you will eat outside Afghanistan, but there’s so much more to this restaurant. Parwana is run by a beautiful, humble family – the entire family – and there is no one who does more for the community.

Keen to share all aspects of their culture with the people of Adelaide, Zelmai and Farida Ayubi run a couple of restaurants. Parwana Afghan Kitchen showcases dishes that would be at home in a royal feast, while Kutchi Deli Parwana, run by their four daughters, is more of a celebration of their rich culture and celebration – this is street party food.

And while the Ayubi are devout Muslims, they offer BYO in their restaurants and send all the proceeds to feed the homeless. Their food and culture punctuates the Australian landscape so beautifully. More of this please!

parwana.com.au

LAVOSH BAKERY

One of Adelaide’s most underrated restaurants, serving up the best charcoal-licked Lebanese food. They make their own bread, while all the pilaf is out the back in giant sunken pits. It’s brilliant. As with all the very best bakeries around the world, it’s so entrenched in our daily routine that we’d all be completely lost if it disappeared. 

FINO

David Swain is cooking some of the best regional food in the Barossa: a touch of wood, a touch of smoke, incredible produce. Add to that heady mix Sharon, one of the best Maître D’s in the country, and package it all up in one of the most beautiful and oldest wineries in South Australia. That’s hard to beat!

seppeltsfield.com.au

LA BUVETTE DRINKERY – FOR AFTER WORK DRINKS

I’ll often grab my restaurant manager for a post-work de-brief at La Buvette. We can nab some natural booze, have a little cheese, charcuterie, snails, or a croque monsieur – the most excellent snacks, really high quality and a great vibe.

labuvettedrinkery.com

GOLDEN BOY

Golden Boy, serving their take on modern Thai, has to be one of Adelaide’s busiest restaurants. The food ticks all the boxes, but it’s really the service that blows me away, it’s super slick, seamless. Luke, the restaurant manager, brings that old school Italian generosity to the floor. The cuisine and service provide an excellent juxtaposition.

golden-boy.com.au

STEPPING OUTSIDE FOOD

The South Australian Museum is one of our best kept secrets. The ‘curious beasts’ exhibit is absolutely world class.

For a casual drink, the Exeter Pub is one of Australia’s most iconic; it’s the pub that started the Australian wine industry, the sawdust on the floor in direct (but delightful) contrast with the Krug in the fridge (incidentally some of the cheapest you will find in Australia). This pub is still a place to enjoy conversations between wine makers, chefs and drongos.

For shopping, I love Beg Your Pardon where super talented tailor Michael Bois has been dressing the who’s who for many years. It’s the only one of its kind in S.A. and like all small businesses, hopefully the more we visit, the longer they will stick around! I also love my trips to the Slick Lobster – best barber shop in the world with the best banter.

For fresh produce, I think Boston Bay Small Goods in Port Lincoln has some of the best pork I’ve tasted in Australia. And then there’s the Motlop family and their business Something Wild. They are doing incredible work in the community to showcase Indigenous ingredients to greater Australia; this is fundamental to building and maintaining that industry.

THE ADELAIDE FESTIVAL FOOD LINE UP

If you want to see collaboration at play, check out the delicious line-up (across the board) for the Adelaide Festival this March. Among many highlights, there’s a series of long lunches to be prepared by great Adelaide chefs (Karl Firla, Christine Manfield, Mark Best, Cheong Liew, Michael Ryan) all designed to celebrate those golden years of the 80s.

adelaidefestival.com.au

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For the love of Newcastle
Words by Mark Hughes on 16 Aug 2015
Most Selector readers would know that the magazine is produced in Newcastle and as editor I am often asked what is Newcastle like? Where do you go to eat and drink? I like to think of Newcastle as Australia’s best kept secret. Known as a steel city, it has long had a reputation as an industrial town with the smokestacks dominating the landscape. But over the last few decades Newcastle has undergone an amazing transformation. Once the biggest employer in the region, the BHP is gone and the blue collar mentality is changing to white or even t-shirt. The University of Newcastle is now the biggest employer, so in that respect Newcastle is a real college town. With that, there is plenty of creativity, a cheaper standard of living and a growing bohemian café and restaurant scene. It may surprise many that Newcastle is a city of natural beauty, bordered by spectacular (clean) beaches and a glorious working harbour. It is of course the gateway to the Hunter Valley, Australia’s oldest and most visited wine region. Just to the south is Lake Macquarie, Australia’s largest salt-water lake offering a plethora of water-based activities from boating to fishing with cafes, restaurants and museums dotting its shores. To the north is glorious Port Stephens, world-renowned for its marine wildlife with whale watching a regular activity in its pristine waters. A time of change The inner city of Newcastle is also going through a real transformation. The main arteries, Hunter Street and Scott Street were once bustling ‘High Street’ style thoroughfares, with hoards of shoppers and business people crowding the sidewalks. But an earthquake in 1987 had an impact that lasted far more than its initial rumblings. Measuring 5.6 on the Richter scale, the tremors tragically claimed the lives of 13 Novocastrians and also caused wide-spread damage. Some buildings needed to be demolished, while a vast majority in the heart of the city were deemed unsafe for business. With an extensive wait for insurance and repair, a plethora of inner city businesses were forced to relocate. Many remerged in quickly growing suburban shopping malls and, as a result, the city of Newcastle became a virtual ghost town overnight. The city’s recovery was initially hindered by Sydney hosting the 2000 Olympics. Money potentially earmarked to revive Newcastle was funnelled into hastily preparing the state’s capital for the world biggest sporting event.
Life
Moon Festival
Words by Mark Hughes on 22 Sep 2015
Falling on the 15th day of the 8th month according to the Chinese lunar calendar, the Moon Festival is the one of the grandest festivals in Asia. Also known as the mid-Autumn Festival, the 15th is when the moon is at its roundest and brightest, and it is a time of special significance. Slightly differing from the customs of Moon Festival in China, Korea celebrates the mid-Autumn event by preparing a banquet to pay respects to ancestors for a successful harvest. During the festivities, Korean people travel back to their hometown to spend time with their families and to enjoy food predominately made from rice, which is harvested during this period.   “The Moon Festival is called Chuseok in Korea,” says Eun Hee An, chef and co-owner with her husband Ben Sears, and wine agent Ned Brooks of Korean restaurant Paper Bird  in the Sydney suburb of Potts Point. “Traditionally, Chuseok is a day to pray to your ancestors in order to assure a good harvest that year. I am from Ulsan, but we have family members in Seoul, Chungju and Busan, so it’s one of the few times a year (along with Seolnal, which is Chinese New Year) that the entire family comes together. We come together, commemorate family members who have passed (Charye) and do Seongmyo, where we make offerings at their graves.” Family feast Of course, with the family gathered, food is important to the festivities and Eun recalls her favourite memory from the Moon Festival when she was a child. “One of the offerings we make is songpyeon: a sweet rice cake, like a mochi, stuffed with honey, sesame or red bean, shaped into a half-moon crescent. Young girls are told that whoever makes the best looking songpyeon will get the best looking husband, so I was always very focused with my mochi decorations!” Unique to the Songpyeon in Korea is the use of pine leaves. During the cooking process, the Songpyeon is steamed together with pine leaves, which adds a delightfully aromatic twist to the traditional dessert. Along with the Songpyeon, Eun’s favourite dish during the Moon Festival was a pan-fried fritter known as jeon, as well as a special recipe perfected by her grandmother. “Besides songpyeon we eat assorted jeon, which is a Korean pan fried fritter. My favourites are zucchini and also my granny’s gochujeon, which is a chilli stuffed with minced beef and then battered and fried. Chuseok in Australia Ben and Eun manned the pans at Sydney’s iconic Claude’s restaurant before it shut down in 2013, which prompted the pair to start up their own venture. From humble beginnings, Moon Park has emerged as one of Sydney’s best Korean restaurants with the menu featuring a fresh focus on traditional Korean. Dishes such as Sooyuk – cold smoked pork belly braised with artichoke and chestnut in mushroom dashi, sit alongside fusion dishes like barbecued octopus with potato cream, kelp oil, garlic chive kimchi, and crispy fried chicken with   pickled radish, soy and syrup. These days with Eun making a life for herself in Sydney with Ben, she celebrates the Moon Festival in her own way. “In a way, Chuseok for me is bittersweet because I am the only member of my family who no longer lives in Korea,” says Eun. “Of course, I still want to celebrate, so I call my parents and talk to everyone about what they are doing and the food they are enjoying. But it is a time of year I realise how far away I am.” Eun says they will also celebrate the Moon Festival with their patrons in the restaurant with some traditional Chuseok dishes added to the menu during Autumn, but she doubts the festival will ever get as big over here as it is back home in Korea. “It would be great, but I don’t think it could ever be,” she says. “Chuseok is a very old tradition in a country where, historically, for many people the quality of the year was defined by the agricultural harvest. Even now, as more people move to cities, it is still so ingrained as a big part of our cultural upbringing.” NOTE: We ran this article in the Spring issue of Selector followed by recipes for chicken skewers and stir-fry beef, and it could be assumed that these recipes were from Moon Park. However, Ben and Eun were not the authors of these recipes and they are in no way affiliated with the products featured in the recipes. Sorry for the confusion, and to Ben and Eun. If you have a hankering for traditional Korean with a fresh focus, then check out P aper Bird , I think you’ll be rewarded.
Life
My City - Sydney with Neil Perry
Words by Neil Perry on 6 Dec 2017
Neil Perry, The Rockpool Group ’s Culinary Director and a chef who has helped shape the food scene in Sydney, reveals where he likes to eat & drink in his hometown. Sydney is a very beautiful city with its harbour and gorgeous white beaches, but it’s so much more than just a pretty face. The restaurants and bars are second to none and they give Sydney a beautiful personality. The city has changed so much over the last 10 years and if you add in Chinatown, some amazing places are all within walking distance. I regularly dine at Rockpool Dining Group restaurants so they feature genuinely in my top picks. My favourite bar in Sydney, hands down, is the bar at Rockpool Bar & Grill . My wife, Sam, and I like to go and enjoy a great bottle of wine, or a fantastic cocktail, or both, while we chat with the bar guys and soak up the amazing buzzy atmosphere. We’ll have some beautiful freshly shucked Sydney Rock oysters, all iodine and tasting fresh of the sea, our favourite minute steak with café de Paris butter, the Cape Grim beef full of flavour and perfectly tender, and we always share a number of sides like roast pumpkin, grilled corn, shoe string fries and a salad. It doesn’t get any better. Breakfast and beyond
Room 10 is the best place in Sydney for coffee and breakfast . Andrew Hardjasudarma and his team not only make some of Sydney’s best coffee, but the food out of such a tiny space is nothing short of miraculous. My go-to is the classic soft boiled egg and avocado on toast, or any of the brilliant breakfast sandwiches - the slow cooked brisket with slaw and pickles is probably their signature. I also love the Brekkie Rice, which is perfect for a healthy start: creamed red rice, quinoa, walnuts and pepitas topped with dukkha. Chaco Bar is without doubt the best yakitori place in town, but it also has next level ramen – served Monday nights and Wednesday to Saturday, lunches only. Go for the chilli coriander – it’s spicy and full flavoured with such a fresh delicious cleanness to it. Add an organic egg: they are awesome! The yakitori skin is crunchy, smoky and creamy all at once and the wing and chicken meatball with slow cooked egg are a must. They also serve the best gyozas. Are you getting that I love this place? Wash it down with a beer and sake and say hi to Chef Keita, we’re lucky to have him in Sydney. Azuma is another terrific Japanese restaurant in the city owned by Kimitaka Azuma. Here we go for sushi and sashimi, which is so well made, and the best dish of all is the wagyu sukiyaki for two. We love sitting sipping sake as I cook our beef slice by slice in the boiling soy broth. We add tofu, bok choy, mushroom and spring onions, all the time cooking another strip of beef and dipping it, eating with rice and then at the end adding udon noodles to the broth. Such a great one pot dish.  Masterful Dim Sum Another favourite from our own portfolio is Jade Temple . I love having the dumplings for lunch, made fresh daily by our Dim Sum Master, Dicky. They’re always so perfectly balanced in taste and texture and I can’t get enough of the roast duck either. Golden Century is famous for being a chef haunt and I was one of the first eating there along with Tetsuya way back in 1990. We all loved the place as it was open late and the food was always fabulous. All these years later, nothing much has changed, only I don’t eat late anymore, I’m in bed well before 3am these days! Sam and I love the green lip abalone steam boat. This is another great one pot dish for two people to share. We get noodles and tofu with it to make the perfect meal. The abalone arrives thinly sliced on lettuce and we have soy dipping and a little XO sauce. The slices are dipped for seconds and added to the soy in your bowl, then start with tofu, then noodles and finish with lettuce, just keep adding broth and seasoning to the bowl as you eat, drinking the soup from time to time. This is one of the world’s great meals, you may even see owners Eric and Linda wandering around. Fire in the Heart Mike McEnearney’s No. 1 Bent Street is a treat. It’s everything I love: no fuss, awesome produce, seasonal cooking and loads of love and care. Everything on the menu is great, but you have to try the bread, it’s possibly the best in Sydney, and anything off the grill or out of the wood fired oven, which form the heart of the kitchen. I love Mike’s touch with vegetables, so order a bunch of salad and veg dishes and eat one of the best plant-based meals in town.
Danielle Alverez at Fred’s in Paddington is another chef cooking beautiful, sustainable, seasonal produce with fire at the heart of the kitchen. Try to score a seat at the kitchen bench: a great spot to share a bottle of wine, watch the kitchen in full swing and eat some of the best food in Sydney. With her pedigree of Chez Panisse and The French Laundry, it’s no surprise everything is delicious. Add a wonderful wine list and beautiful, simple decor and you can settle in for long lunches and dinners. Cheap eats and BBQ Burger Project is a weekly stop for me as well. The Cape Grim 36-month beef is ground in store, hand-formed into patties, and cooked medium – they’re unsurpassed in the city. Naruone is great for a cheap Korean bite . My favourite is the spicy pork with rice. It comes on a sizzling platter with pork slices, cabbage, carrots, onions and sesame seeds after being wok fried in gochujang. It’s spicy and delicious and perfect with a beer. The KFC, Korean Fried Chicken, is really very good too. Dan Jee is my favourite Korean BBQ place . They cook it in the kitchen over a big charcoal grill, rather than at table-side grills, so it gets more of a smoky flavour. Short rib, pork belly and bulgogi are my go-to dishes. I can’t eat there without having Yukhoe, the Korean raw beef salad. It’s amazing with julienne frozen beef, Asian pear egg yolk and sweet sesame dressing that’s perfectly balanced. Further reading:  The Best BYO Restaurants in Sydney
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