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Life

Sharp Thinking

Queensland mechanical engineer Mark Henry had the professional chef in mind when, as a student,  he set about developing a range of knives that were supremely functional and of such quality that they could withstand the rigours of Australia's busiest restaurants. They became so popular with chefs, they are now sought by home cooks as well.

“I developed the knives for working pro chefs,” recalls Mark. “As a young student with no commercial experience, I had no idea about retail. I just wanted to redefine the working chef’s knife and eliminate all those traditional old weaknesses.

“Chefs really liked the Füri knives from the beginning, then they talked about them, wrote about them in their food columns, at their cooking schools. Soon, the department stores were getting so many enquiries from consumers that they wanted Füri too. The demand was such that Füri was an immediate success, and quickly became Australia’s #1 premium knife brand.”

The best metal for the best blade

Most professional knives are produced in Europe, but Mark wanted to design a knife range that totally re-shaped the category. His first idea was to use high carbon Japanese stainless steel, noted for its superior durability and ease of sharpening.  For the best combination of sharpness and toughness, Mark specified the blade be between the thick, strong European style and the sharp, light Japanese style.

“I was determined to use a type of high carbon stainless steel alloy that was more like the old carbon steel knives than the modern European knives,” says Mark. “Without the complex metallurgy, that means Füri knives have the ideal combination for working chefs of a blade material that holds its edge a long time, but is also easier to sharpen than the more common CrMoV alloys used in German knives, and most Japanese knives today. I would love to use full carbon steel, like the famous old French chef knives that take such a sharp edge so easily, but the corrosion would drive everyone mad these days, so it had to be also stain-resistant! Not an easy combination of features, but we achieved it.”

Seamless design

The next crucial element was in the seamless construction. The blade and the handle are one, so there is no place for food to get trapped, and no rivets or plastic parts to fail. So not only does it look stylish, it is the ultimate in food hygiene and durability.

“I thought it was a bit silly that after 800 years of chef knife making, in the ‘90s we still had the same riveted handles, sometimes still with the same type of wood ‘scales’, or plastic more recently,” says Mark.

“My chef friends and I all had knives with handles that had split wood, lots of gunk in the gaps, rivets missing, melted plastic, etc. I worked on a way to make the blade and handle into one seamless piece, while still keeping a hollow cavity in the handle for the correct balance.

“Nothing beats this construction for hygiene and durability, particularly when combined with our tough steel and strong blades.

The Iconic handle

What also raises Füri above its competitors is its innovative handle design. The iconic reverse wedge shape means the handle locks into the hand for a safer grip, which helps reduce hand fatigue, and reduces repetitive strain injuries.

“While I was still at university (QUT) studying my mech engineering degree, I put some research into the forces involved during the most repetitive and heavy cutting motions chefs use,” explains Mark.

“It became quickly evident, to me, that the traditional handle shape (basically the same for 800 years) was opposite to what it should be. The traditional taper which becomes narrower toward the handle actually encourages hand slip toward the blade. Then I realized why nobody cut themselves, even with wet/oily hands: the brain automatically compensates for any small slip by making the hand squeeze tighter on the handle to produce more friction and grip.

“That means fatigue for chefs  in the short term, and arthritis, carpal tunnel and other problems in the long term The Füri reverse-wedge handle actively reduces this slip by becoming thicker toward the blade, in the direction that counts, so that less hand squeeze is required for the same cutting work. This means less fatigue and less hand problems for chefs, or anyone with sore hands.”

Füri’s innovative design elements and materials result in knives of the utmost quality and are the reasons Füri is the knife of choice for chefs around the world. TV chef and restaurateur Kylie Kwong is a Füri brand ambassador, while Nigella Lawson is also a big fan.

Füri knives are ranged in all major department stores and independents around the country. For more information visit furiglobal.com

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Embracing isolation with Frankland Estate’s Hunter Smith
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Wine
Top 50 Wines of 2016
Words by Mark Hughes on 4 Jan 2017
The Wine Selectors Tasting Panel tastes over 3000 wines from Australian producers per year. Here is the best of the best, the top wines that wowed them in 2016. Not many people know this, but I’ve always loved statistics. When I was younger, it was all sports related – D.K Lillee’s bowling average, Chicka Ferguson’s try scoring tally, that sort of stuff. These days I am using that love of maths to discover interesting info about wine. Throughout the year our  Tasting Panel  puts their collective expert palates to the test to determine what wines we send to our members. The wine tasting process is extremely rigorous. The wines are opened the morning of the tasting to allow them to breathe, placed into a bottle cover so no-one can see the label, and poured in brackets that group varietals or styles. The Panel tastes each and every wine and gives them a score out of 20, as per judging at an official wine show. This happens every Friday (and sometimes Wednesday) at Wine Selectors with our Panel tasting up to 100 wines a week. That equates to literally thousands of wines a year, from nearly every producer in every wine region across Australia. So collecting a year’s worth of scores from the Panel reveals some amazing statistics. And from that we can gather some pretty cool information. For instance, not only does it show which producers are leading the charge, what regions had a good vintage and what varietals are doing well – it also shows the changing face of wine. On Trend
That’s the exciting thing about wine – it is always changing. That’s a pretty simple sentence, but when you look at it from different angles, it really says a lot. Yes, it is changing in the bottle as it ages and develops, changes in weather from season to season determine the outcome of how the wine will taste, and there are changes in winemaking techniques and equipment that will improve the taste and the scope of a wine. Ultimately though, I think the biggest change in wine is driven by consumers. Fashion leads demand and if the demand is big enough, it will drive supply. This scenario is pretty evident when looking at our Top 50 wines of 2016. Even before you look at who made the Top 50, just the wines submitted tell a startling story – Aussie drinkers are demanding greater variety. How do we know? Well, in 2016 our Panel tasted more alternative wines than ever before and we are not just talking about a couple of Grigios . Try these on for size: Bianco d’Alessano, Garganega, Muller Thurgau, Verduzzo – and they’re just the whites, they also sipped Aglianico, Lagrein, Montepulciano, Saperavi and Saint Macaire – and that’s only a third of the list of alternative varietals they looked at. How many have you heard of, let alone tried? The exciting thing is, you probably will get to try some of these soon, because quite a few of them are performing exceptionally well – good enough to make it to our Top 50 wines of 2016. For instance, the Serafino Wines Bellissimo Lagrein (placing inside the Top 10, no less), The Pawn Wine Co En Passant Tempranillo and the Bird in Hand Montepulciano. There’s also Touriga, Fiano, Vermentino, Marsanne and more. Yep, it’s an exciting time to be a drinker of Australian wine. Traditional Stars Of course, our traditional varietals also excelled in 2016. Our two biggies, Shiraz (12) and Chardonnay (9) dominated the tallies, but it must be pointed out that their styles have changed to suit the drinking public. The top scoring wine, the Di Giorgio Family Chardonnay 2015, is lean and minerally, described as having “aromas of flint, struck match and oyster shell with a refined palate of intense fig, melon and nectarine,” while the top scoring Shiraz, the Ryan’s Reserve Vanessa’s Vineyard 2014 is a medium to full-bodied Hunter wine with “a ripe and lively core of red and black fruits with hints of Chinese spice.” Riesling was also a big surprise packet this year. Panellist Trent Mannell reckons Riesling is going to be one of the trending wines of 2017 and if the quality of current vintages is anything to go by, he may be right. The  Ferngrove Off Dry Limited Release Riesling 2016  from Western Australia’s Great Southern region was simply superb, taking out second spot overall and was described by the Panel as “impossible to put down”. In all, there were four Rieslings in the Top 50, all from different regions, which goes to show this varietal’s versatility. Read more about  the rise of Australian Riesling in this article Diversity and Consistency
In a nod to diversity, the Top 10 wines were made up of eight different varietals from eight different regions. That’s a real wow moment right there. Chardonnay , Riesling, Marsanne, Shiraz, Muscat, Semillon , Cabernet Merlot and Lagrein – Coonawarra , Great Southern, Nagambie Lakes, Hunter Valley, Rutherglen , Margaret River , Barossa , Adelaide Hills . What that tells us is that viticulturists are getting better at knowing what works in their region and how to get the best out of their grape. It also says that winemakers are becoming more skilled at taking that perfectly grown grape and making great wine. Out of the Top 50 there were only two producers who featured more than once – Howard Park ( Marchand & Burch Chardonnay  and  Howard Park Flint Rock Pinot Noir ) and Brown Brothers (Devil’s Corner Pinot Noir and Innocent Bystander Known Pleasures Shiraz). The same two producers both had two wines each in last year’s Top 50, so it speaks volumes of their ability to consistently produce top wines. And speaking of consistency, it must be noted that the Brown Brothers Devil’s Corner Pinot Noir 2015 replicated the success of the 2014 that featured in  last year’s Top 50 . This is a huge result, as anyone can have a great vintage, but to do it consistently is the mark of a great producer. Vintage and Age The stats show that The Hunter Valley (8), McLaren Vale (7) and Great Southern (7) had great vintages, with 2014 living up to the hype for reds and 2015 for white wines.It was also interesting to note the power of age. Nearly all the wine we buy is consumed soon after we’ve bought it (the same day in my case). However, some producers are lucky enough to be able to hold onto some of their wine to release it at a date when it has aged to perfection – the Tahbilk Marsanne 2010 and Tyrrell’s Vat 1 Semillon 2011, for example. Of course, you can do the same thing, provided you have the ideal storing conditions and you can keep your hands off it. Or, if that seems too hard, you can just check out this list of amazing wines, tally up the ones you like, do the stats and get amongst them. The Best Australian Wines of 2016 Di Giorgio Family Chardonnay 2015 (Coonawarra) Ferngrove Off Dry Limited Release Riesling 2016 (Great Southern) Tahbilk Marsanne 2010 (Nagambie Lakes) Saddler’s Creek Ryan’s Reserve Vanessa Vineyard Shiraz 2014 (Hunter Valley) Stanton & Killen Classic Rutherglen Muscat NV (Rutherglen) Howard Park Wines Marchand & Burch Australian Collection 'Porongurup' Chardonnay 2015 Tyrrell’s Wines Vat 1 Semillon 2011 (Hunter Valley) Henschke & Co Tappa Pass Shiraz 2013 (Barossa) Hamelin Bay Wines Five Ashes Vineyard Cabernet Merlot 2014 (Margaret River) Serafino Wines Bellissimo Lagrein (Adelaide Hills) 2013 The Pawn Wine Co. En Passant Tempranillo 2013 (Adelaide Hills)   Briar Ridge Stockhausen Black Label Semillon 2016 (Hunter Valley) Tyrrell’s Wines 'Stevens' Single Vineyard Shiraz 2014 (Hunter Valley) Scotchmans Hill Sauvignon Blanc 2015 (Geelong) Innocent Bystander Known Pleasures Shiraz McLaren Vale 2014 (McLaren Vale) Byron & Harold The Partners Chardonnay 2015 (Great Southern) Brown Brothers Devil’s Corner Resolution Pinot Noir 2015 (Tasmania) De Iuliis Steven Vineyard Shiraz 2014 (Hunter Valley) Howard Park - 'Flint Rock' Pinot Noir 2015 (Great Southern) Rutherglen Estates Durif 2014 (Rutherglen) Frankland Estate Isolation Ridge Vineyard (Organic) 2013 (Frankland River) Seville Estate Chardonnay 2015 (Yarra Valley) Woods Crampton Pedro Grenache Shiraz Mataro 2015 (Barossa) Dandelion Vineyards Sister’s Run Shiraz 2014 (Barossa) Forest Hill Vineyard Estate Cabernet Sauvignon 2013 (Mount Barker) try the  2011 vintage here Driftwood Artifacts Chardonnay 2014 (Margaret River) Lisa McGuigan Platinum Selection Chardonnay 2015 (Hunter Valley) Bleasdale Vineyards The Powder Monkey Single Vineyard Shiraz 2013 (Langhorne Creek) Hart & Hunter Single Vineyard Twenty Six Rows Chardonnay 2015 (Hunter Valley) Rockcliffe Quarram Rocks Sauvignon Blanc Semillon 2016 (Great Southern) Taylors Wines Riesling 2015 (Clare Valley) Bird in Hand Montepulciano 2014 (Adelaide Hills) Alkoomi Black Label Riesling 2009 (Frankland River) Pertaringa Wines Undercover Shiraz 2014 (McLaren Vale) Shaw Vineyard Estate Olleyville Cabernet Sauvignon 2015 (Canberra) Five Geese Shiraz 2014 (McLaren Vale) Leconfield Wines Richard Hamilton Centurion 122-Year-Old Vine Shiraz 2014 SC Pannell Wines Grenache Shiraz Touriga 2014 (McLaren Vale) Shadowfax Pinot Gris 2015 (Geelong) Dominique Portet Fontaine Rose 2015 (Yarra Valley) McWilliams Wines Mount Pleasant High Altitude Sauvignon Blanc 2015 (Orange) Tulloch - 'Cellar Door Release' Vermentino 2016 (Orange) Oliver’s Taranga Vineyards Fiano 2015 (McLaren Vale) Try the  2016 vintage here Montara Winery Chalambar Road Shiraz 2009 (Grampians) Henry’s Drive Vignerons Henry’s Drive H Syrah 2012 (Padthaway) Margan Family Limited Release Chardonnay 2013 (Hunter Valley) Bremerton Walter’s Cabernet Sauvignon 2012 (Langhorne Creek) Vasse Felix Chardonnay 2015 (Margaret River) d’Arenberg The Dry Dam Riesling (off dry) 2015 (McLaren Vale/Adelaide Hills) Kirrihill Wines Montepulciano 2014 (Mount Lofty)
Two Blues Sauvignon Blanc 2014
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