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Silver Service with Silversea

Silversea, one of the world's most luxurious cruiselines, has partnered with dining and accommodation tastemakers Relais & Chateaux, to offer unparalleled culinary experiences across the entire silversea fleet.

If fresh discoveries are at the heart of your travel dreams, Silversea Cruises can bring them to life.

For those who yearn to explore the new and unknown, Silversea can transport you to the furthermost boundaries of the planet. They offer a choice of over 850 destinations on seven continents, and whereas others have to anchor off shore, their ships can sail up narrow waterways into the heart of a city, or tie up right at the pier.

Of course, while the destination is exciting, with Silversea Cruises, you'll find the journey just as thrilling. Their intimate, ultra-luxury ships offer lavish surroundings with spacious accommodation in ocean-view suites, most with private verandas, and a butler at your service.

RELAIS & CHÂTEAUX

Another source of enormous pride for Silversea is their stellar reputation for culinary excellence and they are thrilled to partner with Relais & Châteaux.

Travel with Silversea Cruises and you'll enjoy inspired cuisine created exclusively by the 'Grands Chefs' of prestigious international association, Relais & Châteaux.

The title of 'Grands Chefs' is given by Relais & Châteaux to only the finest chefs in the world. Being an exclusive collection of 520 of the finest hotels and gourmet restaurants in the world in more than 60 countries, Relais & Châteaux is certainly well placed to bestow this honour.

Through Silversea's partnership with the international stars of this esteemed organisation, you have the opportunity to savour the signature dishes of La Collection du Monde in The Restaurant, the main dining venue found on five of Silversea's ships.

SCHOOL AT SEA

Silverseas cooking school

 

Budding gourmands can also expand their culinary knowledge while on board. On 14 exclusive Culinary Arts Voyages, you can experience an innovative cooking school at sea, L'Ecole des Chefs by Relais & Châteaux. This culinary discovery experience offers a unique and interactive program, hosted by Silversea's Culinary Trainer, Chef David Bilsland.

Wine lovers are catered for too at Le Champagne, the only Wine Restaurant by Relais & Châteaux at sea. Under the theme of 'a celebration of wine', renowned world wine regions are showcased in a set menu of six inspired courses.

FAMILY PRIDE AND PASSION

Silverseas Family Pride and Passion

Travelling with Silversea Cruises, you'll find everyone involved goes to great lengths to ensure every aspect of your journey is of the highest standard.

This comes down to the fact that Silversea Cruises is owned and operated by one family - the Lefebvres of Rome. Not only do they have genuine pride in ownership and a true Italian passion for embracing the best of life, but they also show a personal commitment to maintaining the highest standards of cruise excellence that have been the cornerstone of Silversea from the very beginning.

For more information on Silversea Culinary and Wine voyages contact your Travel Professional or Silversea on 1300 306 872 or visit Silversea.com - ask about our Early Booking Bonus offers and how to save 10%.

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Life
Moon Festival
Words by Mark Hughes on 22 Sep 2015
Falling on the 15th day of the 8th month according to the Chinese lunar calendar, the Moon Festival is the one of the grandest festivals in Asia. Also known as the mid-Autumn Festival, the 15th is when the moon is at its roundest and brightest, and it is a time of special significance. Slightly differing from the customs of Moon Festival in China, Korea celebrates the mid-Autumn event by preparing a banquet to pay respects to ancestors for a successful harvest. During the festivities, Korean people travel back to their hometown to spend time with their families and to enjoy food predominately made from rice, which is harvested during this period.   “The Moon Festival is called Chuseok in Korea,” says Eun Hee An, chef and co-owner with her husband Ben Sears, and wine agent Ned Brooks of Korean restaurant Paper Bird  in the Sydney suburb of Potts Point. “Traditionally, Chuseok is a day to pray to your ancestors in order to assure a good harvest that year. I am from Ulsan, but we have family members in Seoul, Chungju and Busan, so it’s one of the few times a year (along with Seolnal, which is Chinese New Year) that the entire family comes together. We come together, commemorate family members who have passed (Charye) and do Seongmyo, where we make offerings at their graves.” Family feast Of course, with the family gathered, food is important to the festivities and Eun recalls her favourite memory from the Moon Festival when she was a child. “One of the offerings we make is songpyeon: a sweet rice cake, like a mochi, stuffed with honey, sesame or red bean, shaped into a half-moon crescent. Young girls are told that whoever makes the best looking songpyeon will get the best looking husband, so I was always very focused with my mochi decorations!” Unique to the Songpyeon in Korea is the use of pine leaves. During the cooking process, the Songpyeon is steamed together with pine leaves, which adds a delightfully aromatic twist to the traditional dessert. Along with the Songpyeon, Eun’s favourite dish during the Moon Festival was a pan-fried fritter known as jeon, as well as a special recipe perfected by her grandmother. “Besides songpyeon we eat assorted jeon, which is a Korean pan fried fritter. My favourites are zucchini and also my granny’s gochujeon, which is a chilli stuffed with minced beef and then battered and fried. Chuseok in Australia Ben and Eun manned the pans at Sydney’s iconic Claude’s restaurant before it shut down in 2013, which prompted the pair to start up their own venture. From humble beginnings, Moon Park has emerged as one of Sydney’s best Korean restaurants with the menu featuring a fresh focus on traditional Korean. Dishes such as Sooyuk – cold smoked pork belly braised with artichoke and chestnut in mushroom dashi, sit alongside fusion dishes like barbecued octopus with potato cream, kelp oil, garlic chive kimchi, and crispy fried chicken with   pickled radish, soy and syrup. These days with Eun making a life for herself in Sydney with Ben, she celebrates the Moon Festival in her own way. “In a way, Chuseok for me is bittersweet because I am the only member of my family who no longer lives in Korea,” says Eun. “Of course, I still want to celebrate, so I call my parents and talk to everyone about what they are doing and the food they are enjoying. But it is a time of year I realise how far away I am.” Eun says they will also celebrate the Moon Festival with their patrons in the restaurant with some traditional Chuseok dishes added to the menu during Autumn, but she doubts the festival will ever get as big over here as it is back home in Korea. “It would be great, but I don’t think it could ever be,” she says. “Chuseok is a very old tradition in a country where, historically, for many people the quality of the year was defined by the agricultural harvest. Even now, as more people move to cities, it is still so ingrained as a big part of our cultural upbringing.” NOTE: We ran this article in the Spring issue of Selector followed by recipes for chicken skewers and stir-fry beef, and it could be assumed that these recipes were from Moon Park. However, Ben and Eun were not the authors of these recipes and they are in no way affiliated with the products featured in the recipes. Sorry for the confusion, and to Ben and Eun. If you have a hankering for traditional Korean with a fresh focus, then check out P aper Bird , I think you’ll be rewarded.
Life
Gourmet Destinations - Argentina
Words by Guy Wilkinson on 6 Mar 2015
Wander the streets of Buenos Aires and it won’t take long to hit you; the mysterious, alluring aroma of grilled meat wafting from a restaurant door, or, just as likely, somebody’s backyard. Food in Argentina is a big deal. It’s as deeply entrenched in the culture as tango or ‘the beautiful game’ and when it comes to cooking, the term fast food is something of an oxymoron. Much of the cuisine revolves around meat. Mention the word ‘vegan’ and most people will assume you’re talking about Dr Spock. Argentines are the world’s second largest consumers of beef; each person chows down around 58 kilograms a year and more than half the restaurants in the country are parrillas, named after the grill the meat is cooked over. None of this is to suggest it’s as simple as slapping a quick steak on the barbecue while rustling up a salad. Anything but. In Argentina, the cooking of meat is seen as an art form and is treated with appropriate reverence. “It’s about taking your time,” says Elvis Abrahanowicz, co-founder of Sydney’s acclaimed Argentine restaurant, Porteno. “It’s all to do with the fire, getting the embers just right and warming them up slowly. There’s hardly any heat in it. “If you’re cooking a whole animal, you always have a fire on the side rather then smashing it full of coals. You really only cook it on one side. It gets the heat into the bones then the bones get hot so it’s almost cooking from the inside out.” Influences Argentine cuisine has heavy Mediterranean influences, thanks largely to Spanish colonisation in the 16th Century, as well as a massive influx of Italian immigration in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. If beefsteak is the staple, it’s almost always accompanied with chimichuri sauce, a simple but fiendishly delicious combination of garlic, onion, olive oil, oregano, red wine vinegar and lime juice. And then there’s chorizo, though as Carole Poole, a former Argentine native now living in Australia, explains, “It’s sacrilege to call a chorizo a ‘sausage’, as it is so much more; nothing I’ve tasted anywhere else in the world comes near to the flavour of a good chorizo.” Cooked on an asado, the Spanish term for barbecue, chorizo is often served simply in a crispy bread roll and regarded as a meal in itself. Meat is often seasoned minimally, using mainly salt and pepper. Of greater importance is the way in which it’s cooked, as well as the cuts chosen. “Apart from the chorizos, and equally important, are the different cuts of meat that comprise the ‘asado’”, explains Carole. “Favourites are skirt steak, f lank steak, sweet breads, black pudding, and even small intestine, always garnished for extra flavour while cooking with chimichurri.” The usual accompaniments for an asado are fresh crisp bread, green salad and frequently, potato salad. Creme caramel or flan is the dessert of choice, often drizzled with dulce de leche sauce, a deliriously delicious sweetened milk confection. Family Affair Aside from the cooking itself, part of the importance of food culturally in Argentina stems from a desire for friends and family to convene and spend quality time together. “It’s everything,” says Elvis. “I think because of the mix of cultures, everyone wants to bring it all together and share it, it’s created its own cuisine, one that people are super passionate about. “If we had an asado at my house, it’d be an all day affair, a big eating fest! Everyone gets up early. The girls would get making fresh pasta and the guys would get the fire going, and my dad and uncles would cook all day.” None of this is to suggest that anything overly elaborate or pretentious would accompany the cooking process. If anything, Elvis’ father, Adan, who works alongside his son in the kitchen at Porteno, is known to actively eschew expensive gear in favour of more old-school methods. “My old man is the MacGyver of making barbecues,” jokes Elvis. “He’ll make one out of anything, a few bricks, some wire mesh. We still cook like that.” The point was reinforced after Adan bagged himself a $7000 state-of-the art barbecue after winning a cooking competition a couple of years back. Apparently Adan lit it up once, after which it languished in the garage gathering dust, never to be used again. Perhaps it’s a fitting metaphor for Argentine food, where simplicity is key and less is so often more.
Life
Silversea - An invite to an exclusive escape
Selector , Wine Selectors and Silversea Cruises invite you on an exclusively curated food + wine experience aboard Silver Muse. This once-in-a-lifetime adventure begins, pre-cruise, in Barcelona, where you’ll spend two wonderful days and nights.  Day one features an exclusive day trip to the world renowned Bodegas Torres, guided by Selector publisher Paul Diamond, where you’ll enjoy a hosted Torres tasting followed by an exquisite local lunch with perfectly paired wines.  The next day, armed with a wealth of information on Barcelona’s gourmet gems beyond the tourist trail, you’ll spend the morning on an exciting exploration. That afternoon will see you boarding the luxurious Silver Muse, the newest ship in the Silversea fleet, and setting sail on an exquisite seven-night cruise. 
Mediterranean enchantment First stop is the historic old port on the island of Ibiza, part of Spain’s sun drenched Balearic Islands. Then you’ll visit Porto Mahon on the pre-historic Menorca, a Mediterranean island that has escaped the ravages of tourism and modernism.  Antibes, and the gorgeous Provence region of France, will be your next destination – an amazing opportunity to immerse yourself in Provençal wine, food and culture.  The port of Monte Carlo and the Côte d’Azur follow, where you get to explore the municipality of Monaco and beyond. 
Italy odyssey  The Italian Riviera awaits, with the beautiful fishing village of Portofino offering the chance to dive to the depths of the Christ of the Abyss, have a swim at Paraggi, or view the Ligurian Sea on the cliffs of Santa Margherita. The Florentine port of Livorno is next, from where you’ll visit Florence for a private Tuscan masterclass. Your hosts will be the Ricasoli family of Castelo Brolio, the most important of the Chianti families, dating back to the 12th century.  The next day will begin at Leone Blu Residenza D’Epoca Ricasoli, a private hotel where you will taste the estate’s finest wines in the Mirrors Salon overlooking the Arno River.  An exquisite hosted Tuscan lunch will follow in the Bettino Salon, overlooking the Goldoni square. Fully sated, you’ll head off to explore the glories of Florence before heading back to the ship for dinner. Finally, having created eight days of incredible memories, you’ll farewell your new friends as you disembark in the Roman port of Civitavecchia. An invite to an exclusive escape 11 Nights Mediterranean Cruise - Barcelona to Rome Departs Barcelona 5 th September, 2018 Escorted by Selector Publisher, Paul Diamond + Enquire or book today! For more information on itinerary and how to book please click here .
Two Blues Sauvignon Blanc 2014
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