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Q:What is Vermentino? A: Your new favourite white wine

Australian Vermentino is going from strength to strength with an increasing stream of impressive wines being produced by winemakers across the country. To help us learn more about this vibrant new style, we reached out to a few Vermentino experts with winemakers from Box Grove Vineyard, The Little Wine Co, and Chalk Hill Wines .

Vermentino hails from Italy’s Liguria region and the Mediterranean Islands of Sardinia and Corsica. With its light to medium body, Vermentino has a similar weight and profile to Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Grigio, and    Riesling. Styles range from light and fresh to rich and textural. On the palate there are notes of lime, almond, green apple, white florals, a unique sense of sea spray, and refreshing acidity perfect for the Australian summer.

 

Vermentino at a glance

Vermentino infographic guide to pairing taste profile and style

Vermentino in Australia

McLaren Vale’s Mediterranean-style climate and proximity to the coast are perfectly suited to Vermentino, as it is remarkably similar to the environment around Liguria, the original home of this variety. However, as a very hardy variety, it has adopted well across a variety of regions such as the Hunter Valley , Central Victoria and the Australian home of Italian varietals , the King Valley . All of these different growing conditions, from warmer to moderate, encourage differing styles from light and fresh to rich and textural.

Production of Australian Vermentino is increasing each year, due in no small part to the demand for alternate varieties across the country. According to Box Grove Vineyard winemaker, Sarah Gough, Vermentino's “charm lies in its delicate, briney nose and long, fresh palate. It doesn't need oak to enhance these flavours or fill out any weight on the palate. It can be made in March, and bottled in late spring the same year and enjoyed over the long summer months.”

Crafting the perfect specimen

As a late ripening variety with long and loose bunches, Vermentino can be confusing to Australian winemakers at first. Little Wine Co. winemaker Suzanne Little, whose 2016 vintage won the Best Alternative White trophy at the Hunter Valley Wine Show, states that as Vermentino is a “more textural, complex style, it needs to be allowed to ripen – given it is already a late-ripening style, it takes a little nerve to let it stay out there when all of the whites and most of the reds have already been picked.”

Chalk Hill winemaker Renae Hirsch remembers her conundrum with their 2016 harvest, as their crop "had good flavour, but it was still looking a little austere with fairly high acid levels, but I made the call to harvest as there was a spell of hot weather forecast for the following week and I didn't want to lose the vibrancy in the fruit from letting it hang out there in the heat, so I booked it in to harvest.” That vintage won the 2016 International Judges Wine of Show at the McLaren Vale Wine Show.

Vermentino Wine Pairing

Vermentino is a very food friendly wine, matching perfectly with the diverse range of fresh seafood, salads and light Asian-inspired dishes, popular during the long Australian summer. Luke Nguyen's chilli salted squid recipe is a fantastic match as the sweetness and spice from the squid balance the refreshing acidity of Australian Vermentino. Suzanne Little from the Little Wine Company notes that their style of Vermentino also pairs very well with prawn dumpling dishes , owing in part to the notes of sea spray common to this variety. Asian Inspirations have a great guide on how to make your own dumplings you might like to match with Vermentino.

Owing to its Mediterranean roots, a myriad of classic Italian, Maltese and Sicilian dishes excel. Guy Grossi’s Carciofi alla Romana recipe is a perfect accompaniment to the similarly Italian style of a McLaren Vale Vermentino.

TRY AUSTRALIAN VERMENTINO TODAY

It’s safe to say that Australian Vermentino won’t stay a hidden secret for too long, as the consistently superb standard of these wines is remarkable, as is the increasing demand from consumers for alternate varieties. Stay ahead of the curve with these expertly curated wines selected by our Tasting Panel .

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