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Bleasdale's Paul Hotker Loves Wine - And Bacon!

The Bleasdale Frank Potts Cabernet Blend 2013 is our May Wine of the Month, so we caught up with Bleasdale's senior winemaker Paul Hotker.

Can you recall the first wine you tried?

I can't remember any specific bottle, does Stone's Ginger Wine count? There was always wine at the table growing up, plenty of West Oz Cabernet as I grew up in Perth, and Eden Valley Riesling, I still drink these wines.

When did you fall in love with wine? 
I remember drinking some beautiful Rutherglen Muscat in my early 20s, as well as cellared Bordeaux and Margaret River Cab - wines that probably set me on the path to the wine business.

Do you have an all-time favourite wine?

I'm not usually one for favourites, but Hugel 1989 SGN Gewürztraminer was an unexpected gem in a tutored tasting about 15 years ago, and I got to take the leftover bottle home.

What is your all-time favourite wine memory (other than a wine itself)?

Sharing great bottles with friends and family and those who appreciate it is always fun. Most recently, my last bottle of 2001 Semillon made at uni (good but not great) served blind with the mates who made it 16 years ago. We drank far better wine after this prelude to dinner.


Other than your own wine, what is the wine that you like to drink at home?

I drink widely, but also seasonally. Late summer and into autumn usually Pinot Noir, Grenache and blends, mature whites - aged RieslingChardonnay and Sancerre. Later autumn and into winter, mature reds and whites. As spring and summer come along, younger whites and reds with vibrancy: Riesling, Traminer, Sauvignon Blanc and blends, younger Shiraz, Cab Merlot blends, etc.

What's your ultimate food + wine match?

Roast chook and Chardonnay, always a favourite, particularly during vintage.

What's your 'signature dish'?

I don't have a signature dish, it depends on the season. Roast pork with redgum smoke I make at all times of the year, I love the challenge of 100% crackle! Very keen on the flame grill, just about anything: beefsteak, lamb chops, butterflied chicken, and I love slow cooked meals in winter: roast chook, osso bucco, boeuf bourguignon are all perfect with mature reds.

What is special about your wine region?

Langhorne Creek is a cool maritime but dry region with beautiful clay and limestone soils. The cool ripening period moderated by Lake Alexandrina and The Southern Ocean maintains the aromatics and natural acidity

How do you relax away from the winery?

I'm a keen reader, I love cycling through the Adelaide Hills, which is on my doorstep. I like playing board games and puzzles with the family: chess, scrabble, UNO, snap, just about anything.

Do you have a favourite holiday destination/memory?

I love Kangaroo Island, easy to get to from here and great to slow the pace down a few notches.

What is your favourite book?

No favourites, but I just finished the Harry Potter series, couldn't put it down.


No favourites, but I prefer independent films, I recently saw Paterson, which was a cracker, as was Drive.

TV show?

The Fast Show.



Locally, The Olfactory Inn at Strathalbyn is excellent.


Can't go past bacon and eggs, everything tastes better with bacon.


BLT, everything tastes better with bacon.


Roast pork, that's close to bacon, right?

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The Wine Selectors Wine of the Month for October is the d’Arenberg The Broken Fishplate Sauvignon Blanc 2014. So we caught up with its maker, the man of many shirts, Chester Osborn. You’re a finalist in the Entrepreneur of the Year National Awards – how does that feel? I feel quite honoured, however, at the end of the day I’m just doing what I love. It’s not work. If it’s worth doing it’s worth doing well. Can you recall the first wine you tried? It was probably a flagon wine when I was about four years old. I also remember that at around seven I tasted the so-called good reds and I didn’t like them. The fortified white Muscat was nice though. When did you fall in love with wine? At the age of seven I decided I wanted to be a winemaker, so I guess I was in love with wine even if I didn’t like much of it. It’s a hard call but do you have a favourite wine or varietal? I suppose it would be Nebbiolo from Piedmont. However, Grenache from McLaren Vale or Priorat are right up there. How do you come up with your wine names? It used to be never before 2am. Now it’s sitting on the toilet first thing in the morning reading the dictionary. How has your dad d’Arry influenced you? From time to time dad talks about how he used to do things, which puts his wines in perspective. Most of todays’ wines and the winemaking are the same as then but with more control. Dad was also frugal with money, which has been good in making me justify every expense. It has been a great working relationship. Often he worries, but what was planned more or less always occurs. White, red or both? At d’Arenberg we produce 72 wines from 37 grape varieties – all colours are accounted for. What do you do when you’re not making wine? Lately the d’Arenberg Cube has been taking up an enormous amount of time, especially the art installations but also all of the intricate architecture and engineering. Lots of wine tasting and drinking also fill my days and nights, and I have a heap of other projects on the go.
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Two Blues Sauvignon Blanc 2014
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