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Byron & Harold | Wines of the Season

History

Two lovers of wine, Paul Byron and Harold (Ralph) Dunning joined forces with vigneron Andrew Lane to form Byron & Harold. With more than 65 years combined experience in wine, they meticulously seek out parcels of wine they know Australian wine lovers will love. Based in WA’s Great Southern, Byron & Harold deliver wines with flavour, true to their variety – wines with provenance.

Tasting Notes

Brilliant pale straw in the glass, this gorgeous Rose & Thorns Riesling presents complex aromas of citrus blossom, lemon zest and green apple with underlying floral notes. 
On the palate, it appeals with a long, fleshy mouth feel, and gorgeous characters of lemon blossom and crunchy green apple with complex floral notes complemented by well integrated natural acidity leading to a lovely crisp mineral finish.

The 2017 vintage

The 2017 vintage was one of the latest vintages in recent times, reminiscent more of the 1990s. With an abundance of groundwater, soil temperatures remained cool, which delayed budburst by three to four weeks. Flowering and fruit set were also exceptional due to the levels of groundwater. Although it was a challenging vintage, the long, cold wet winter combined with the mild summer has resulted in some exceptional fruit.

+ Food

The natural acidity in Riesling makes it a beautiful match with a range of fresh summer seafood. Throw a feast together of prawns, ocean fish, and oysters and share this wine on a lazy afternoon with family and friends.

byronandharold.com.au

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Pinot Gris vs Grigio: What’s the difference?
Pinot Gris and Pinot Grigio are the same grape variety, so what's the difference? We talk to some passionate Pinot G winemakers to find out. While it's fast becoming one of Australia's most popular varieties,  PinotGris/Grigio  still presents a point of confusion for many wine-lovers. Made from one variety, a member of the Pinot Noir family, this grape has two different names thanks to the two countries in which it is most commonly grown: France and Italy. Gris is French for "grey" and in France it finds its home in the Alsace region. French Pinot Gris is generally known for being a rich, full-bodied white with a lovely silky texture. Grigio is the Italian for "grey" and in contrast to the French, Italian Grigio has made a name for being a light, crisp wine ideal for early drinking and is most famously known in the regions of Veneto and Friuli. Across the two styles, the common aroma and flavour descriptors include apple, pear, strawberry, honey, hay, brioche and bread. AUSSIE HOME
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Another standout Aussie Pinot G producer is  Wicks Estate  in the  Adelaide Hills , where, Tim Wicks, explains, "The cool evenings promote great acid retention in the fruit, along with a gradual flavour ripeness without excess phenolic development. This allows the variety to retain a charming aromatic lift which combines beautifully with the subtle textural elements." At Wicks Estate, they make a Gris rather than a Grigio, but as Tim describes, it may be akin to the Gris style, but it maintains a hint of the Grigio aromatics and racier acid lines. This is reflective of the Gris-Grigio overlap that Tim sees as common in Australia. "We have countless fantastic wines that tend towards either the richer Gris characters or lighter aromatic Grigio characteristics. There are also wines that exhibit traits of both, take our  Wicks Estate Pinot Gris , for example. We like the sharpened focus and aromatic style of the Grigio, but tend to lean towards the textural qualities of Gris on the palate. The styles have their own identity, however, we have diverse terroir and climate in Australia that can lend itself to a hybrid style."   THE PROOF IS IN THE TASTING At the end of the day, whether you go for a  richer Gris or a zestier Grigio , or a mix of both, only your palate can decide. To help you choose, we've got an extensive range from the Mornington Peninsula, Adelaide Hills and beyond to  explore  .
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Know Your Varietal - Arneis
Words by Adam Walls on 7 Sep 2017
Adam Walls reveals how Arneis,  Italy’s ‘little rascal’ is proving a hit in Australia thanks to its rich appeal. Crisp and floral, Arneis is a white that Italian winemakers often blend with Nebbiolo to add a touch of sweetness and perfume. In Australia, it’s proving tough to grow due to the fact that it’s low-cropping and susceptible to many vineyard diseases. However, it’s certainly an emerging hit. Arneis - an Infographic Guide Origins
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