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Byron & Harold | Wines of the Season

History

Two lovers of wine, Paul Byron and Harold (Ralph) Dunning joined forces with vigneron Andrew Lane to form Byron & Harold. With more than 65 years combined experience in wine, they meticulously seek out parcels of wine they know Australian wine lovers will love. Based in WA’s Great Southern, Byron & Harold deliver wines with flavour, true to their variety – wines with provenance.

Tasting Notes

Brilliant pale straw in the glass, this gorgeous Rose & Thorns Riesling presents complex aromas of citrus blossom, lemon zest and green apple with underlying floral notes. 
On the palate, it appeals with a long, fleshy mouth feel, and gorgeous characters of lemon blossom and crunchy green apple with complex floral notes complemented by well integrated natural acidity leading to a lovely crisp mineral finish.

The 2017 vintage

The 2017 vintage was one of the latest vintages in recent times, reminiscent more of the 1990s. With an abundance of groundwater, soil temperatures remained cool, which delayed budburst by three to four weeks. Flowering and fruit set were also exceptional due to the levels of groundwater. Although it was a challenging vintage, the long, cold wet winter combined with the mild summer has resulted in some exceptional fruit.

+ Food

The natural acidity in Riesling makes it a beautiful match with a range of fresh summer seafood. Throw a feast together of prawns, ocean fish, and oysters and share this wine on a lazy afternoon with family and friends.

byronandharold.com.au

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You’re shipwrecked on a desert island with one bottle of wine – what did you bring? Find out about the wines our experts believe they just couldn’t survive without. Picture this – it’s a balmy sunny Sunday and you’re on a boat bobbing around on the ocean with friends enjoying the good life. The skies suddenly darken, the sea begins to churn, but luckily before the waves come crashing down washing you over overboard, you’re able to rescue a bottle of your favourite wine.  Nicole Gow – Wine Selectors Tasting Panellist , Wine Show Judge “I chose Chardonnay with melon and stone fruits in abundance. Survival in nothing but luxury is my goal. I'll be gathering my tropical fruits each morning, hunting some shellfish and chilling my bottle in the cooling rock pools, while I'm getting subtly toasted, just like my yummy oak!” Credaro Five Tales Chardonnay 2016 Brad Russ – Tulloch Wines “Sparkling of course. Drinking Sparkling suggests it’s party time – in this case on a deserted island so it’s very exclusive and bespoke, plus it’s the perfect accompaniment to freshly shucked oysters and seafood. And, if I drank enough I’d be able to use the corks to float my boat.”   Tulloch Cuvée NV Scott Austin –  Austins & Co, Six Foot Six
“It’s Pinot Gris for me! It’s a real conversation starter, a wine to destress with, to simplify the issues and bring claim to the group of stranded crew, and begin the bonding process for everyone to get to know each other and work out what they will do next. It's crisp and refreshing style will bring light and clarity to an otherwise potentially intense situation.” Six Foot Six Pinot Gris 2016 Anna Watson –  Lost Buoy Wines “I’d take Shiraz to drink with the wild goat we just hunted and cooked, and to drink with the shipwrecked sailors washed up on the shore. And, if it’s cold weather, I could simmer it down for a great mulled wine. However, I’d probably also take a case of Gin - more medicinal". Lost Buoy The Edge Shiraz 2016 Adam Walls – Wine Selector Tasting Panellist and Wine Educator, and Wine Show Judge “Rosé for sure! There is no better wine to have at your disposal when stuck on an island – it’s cold and crisp and defines refreshment. And it blends in perfectly with the colour of your sunburn!’ Chaffey Bros Not Your Grandma’s Rosé 2017 6 Wines for when You're lost-at-sea Throw yourself a life raft and get shipwrecked-ready with the official  Wine Island 6-pack that includes a fantastic selection of favourites including a bottle each of Credaro Five Tales Chardonnay 2016 , Six Foot Six Pinot Gris 2016 ,   Tulloch Cuvée NV , Chaffey Bros Not Your Grandma’s Rosé 2017 , Byron & Harold Rose & Thorns Cabernet Sauvignon 2015 and Lost Buoy The Edge Shiraz 2016 . 
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Rosé revealed – how is it made?
The time is ripe for Rosé – spring afternoons and evenings are perfect for relishing the refreshing, savoury characters of fabulous Australian drops. But, as you sit back and sip its deliciousness, do you ever wonder exactly how Rosé is made? Up until a few years ago, Australian winemakers made Rosé as an afterthought, says Tasting Panellist Adam Walls . “Whereas now, the wines are being made deliberately, with designated parcels of fruit that have been picked specifically to be turned into Rosé.”  As Hunter Valley winemaker Mike De Iuliis explains, “There are two distinct keys to making quality Rosé. First is the variety that is being used, and second is timing of harvest.” There are many different styles of wine and as Mike describes, “Rosé is quite a personalised wine and at De Iuliis, we are looking to produce a style that is bright, fresh and vibrant. We also try to produce a drier, more savoury style that is built around texture and acidity rather than sugar and fruit.”  So, how is Rosé made? The Maceration Method Just like red wine, Rosés pick up their colour from the skin of red wine grapes. The winemaker can determine the depth of colour in the wine by deciding how long to leave the juice in contact with the skins, typically anywhere from 2 to 24 hours – the shorter the time, the lighter the colour. The amount of time a winemaker leaves the juice in contact with the skins, Hunter Valley winemaker Mike De Iuliis explains: 

“It depends on the variety you're using. With our special release Rosé, which is made from Grenache, the fruit is harvested by machine and then transported to the Hunter Valley (from the Hilltops). This time on skin is about long enough (approx. 8-12 hours), to pick up the colour that we like and also the flavour profile that we are looking for.”

- Mike De Iuliis, De Iuliis Wines - Hunter Valley
There are different techniques used for this process, including the maceration method, which allows the crushed skins of the red wine grapes to ‘steep’, or macerate, in the juice for a short period of time, before the skins are removed and the entire tank is finished into a Rosé wine.  The Saignée Method Another method is called the Saignée (‘san-yay’), or the ‘bleed’ method. This involves ‘bleeding off’ a portion of the juice – while the remaining goes on to make red wine – into a separate vat to finish fermentation. This technique can result in some really lovely examples. Saignée expert Andrew Margan is a strong proponant of this style:

When making rose using this method we soak the unfermented grape juice on its skins for about 48 hours and allow the juice to soak some colour and flavour out of the skins before we run just 10 % of that juice off into another tank and add yeast to ferment it like a white wine. Cold fermentation ensures that the fruit flavours and aromas are conserved in the finished wine.The key is to make sure you drain off the juice at the right time. Because we have much softer tannins here in the Hunter and we obtain ripeness of flavour at lower alcohols we can make a saignee style rose that does not require any residual sugar and has enough richness of flavour without being too high in alcohol to make a dry rich Rosé

- Andrew Margan, Margan Wines
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Know Your Variety - Prosecco
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Our home of Prosecco is Victoria’s King Valley , driven by the Italian heritage of many of the local wine pioneers. Add to this the similarity of the region’s rolling hills to those of Veneto and you’ve got Prosecco perfection. You’ll also find great examples in the Adelaide Hills , Macedon and Hilltops . Characters The Glera grape has high acidity and a fairly neutral palate, making it ideal for Sparkling wine production. Prosecco is made using the Italian method where secondary fermentation occurs in a pressurised tank, the bubbles are captured and the wine is then bottled under pressure. This results in a lower alcohol wine driven by bright fruit and acidity rather than the savouriness of bottle fermented fizz. Find out more about the difference between Champagne and Prosecco here . Glera’s aromatic profile is characterised by white peaches, pear and citrus. You can also get floral notes of jasmine and hints of pistachio nut.
Two Blues Sauvignon Blanc 2014
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