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Wine

Discover our Top 12 Reds of 2017

2017 was a super-busy year for our Panel who tasted and rated over 4,000 wines. With so many wines in the running, the Best Wines of the Year is always a hotly contested list and this year was no exception.

From tried and true varietal champions like Hunter Valley and Great Southern Shiraz, to fabulous blends such as Grenache Shiraz Mourvèdre from the Barossa, plus magical Margaret River Malbec, here are the Top 12 Reds that really stood out from the crowd and wowed all of our Panellists.

View our Top 12 white wines here.

Howard Park Flint Rock Shiraz 2015, Great Southern

In the glass: Deep purple. 
On the nose: Black plum, blackberry, pepper and vanillin oak. 
On the palate: Black, blue and purple fruits, subtle peppery depth and great balance of tannins and acidity. Rich, flavoursome and intense yet elegant.
RRP $26 or $22.10 per bottle in any dozen.  

Kaesler Stonehorse Grenache Shiraz Mourvedre 2014, Barossa Valley

In the glass: Medium density red. 
On the nose: Complex lift of dark berry, plum, cedar and earth. 
On the palate: Medium to full bodied with a core of black fruit and layers of cassis and vanilla. Silken with balanced tannins giving a rich, velvety texture. 
RRP $22 or $18.70 per bottle in any dozen. 

Lou Miranda Leone Cabernet Sauvignon 2015, Barossa Valley

In the glass: Full red garnet. 
On the nose: Bright plum, currant, cassis, mint and cedar. 
On the palate: Full bodied with a core of black and blue fruit, firm yet ripe tannins and vibrant acidity. Savoury with hints of liquorice, spice and dried herb. 
RRP $22.95 or $19.51 per bottle in any dozen. 

Erin Eyes Gallic Connection Cabernet Malbec 2015, Clare Valley

In the glass: Deep red.      
On the nose: Blackberry, mulberry, bay leaf and vanillin oak. 
On the palate: Powerful yet poised with saturated black fruits, well-judged supporting oak, fine and persistent tannin drive and balancing acidity. 
RRP $30 or $25.50 per bottle in any dozen. 

Leconfield Merlot 2016, Coonawarra

In the glass: Bright red black. 
On the nose: Powerful aromas of black cherry concentrate with flashes of spearmint and eucalypt.  
On the palate: Generous kirsch, mulberry and cassis with dense inky power, a velvety core and deluxe 
oak harmony.  
RRP $26 or $22.10 per bottle in any dozen. 

Helen & Joey Inara Pinot Noir 2016, Yarra Valley

In the glass: Pale to mid ruby. 
On the nose: Pure, fresh red berry, floral perfume. 
On the palate: Vibrant and silken with delicious strawberry and blueberry depth, tea-like notes, fine tannins and a complete finish. Packs so much flavour into a lighter-bodied wine. Gorgeous. 
RRP $23 or $19.55 per bottle in any dozen. 

Tyrrell's Wines Special Release Shiraz 2014, Hunter Valley

In the glass: Brilliant deep purple.
On the nose: Violet, plum, blackberry and black pepper. 
On the palate: Shows power and finesse. Loaded with spicy black fruit depth with on-point acidity and savoury tannins driving the long finish. 
RRP $40 or $34 per bottle in any dozen.

Dandelion Vineyards Red Queen of the Eden Valley Shiraz 2013, Eden Valley

In the glass: Deep purple. 
On the nose: Plum, blackberry, graphite, pepper and clove. 
On the palate: Layered and complex, it opens with savoury black fruits, an alluring spice complexity and fine yet deep tannins.
RRP $100 or $85.00 per bottle in any dozen

David Hook Reserve Barbera 2016, Hunter Valley

In the glass: Medium density red. 
On the nose: Plum, bramble, black olive and tobacco aromas.
On the palate: Medium weight with typical varietal freshness showing vibrant plummy fruit, savoury tannins and a touch of cigar box on the finish. A lovely young Barbera with plenty potential. 
RRP $30 or $25.50 per bottle in any dozen. 

Kimbolton Fig Tree Cabernet Sauvignon 2014, Langhorne Creek

In the glass: Full dark red. 
On the nsoe: Classic Cabernet red berry, currant, cassis and cedar lift. 
On the palate: Beautifully textured and deep yet only medium weight with a varietal core of black fruit, cassis and crushed leaf. 
RRP $25 or $21.25 per bottle in any dozen. 

Hay Shed Hill Malbec 2015, Margaret River

In the glass: Intense red black scarlet. On the nose: Hugely concentrated black cherry with interwoven complex notes of black pepper, currant and spicy oak. 
On the palate: A gentle giant with super-ripe, glossy black cherry fruit power, beautiful velvety texture and deluxe spicy oak support. Classy! 
RRP $30 or $25.50 per bottle in any dozen. 

Riorret Lusatia Park Pinot Noir 2016, Yarra Valley

In the glass: Vibrant mid-red. 
On the nose: Sweet cherry and raspberry fruit with notes of stalk and spice. 
On the palate: Vibrant and fresh, supple and juicy with ripe cherry and plum, subtle stalky complexity, warm earthy notes and integrated vanillin oak. 
RRP $50 or $42.50 per bottle in any dozen.

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