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Wine

Discover our Top 12 Whites of 2017

In 2017, our Panel tasted and rated over 4,000 wines. The Best Wines of the Year is always a hotly contested list and this year was no exception.

From tried and true favourites like Howard Park Margaret River Chardonnay, to fabulous alternative varietals such as Fiano from Chalk Hill’s McLaren Vale vineyard, plus Trophy-winning Tahbilk Roussanne Marsanne Viognier, here (in no particular order) are the Top 12 Whites that really stood out from the crowd and wowed all of our Panellists.

View our Top 12 red wines here.

In Dreams Chardonnay 2015, Yarra Valley

In the glass: Pale lemon green. 
On the nose: Apple, grapefruit, oatmeal and almond aromas. 
On the palate: Fine and elegant and yet it has power and drive with a delicious core of white and yellow fruits. A savoury, almost salty layer adds complexity, velvety texture and racy acidity. 
RRP $23 or $19.55 per bottle in any dozen. 

Chalk Hill Fiano 2016, McLaren Vale

In the glass: Bright straw. 
On the nose: Opulent white fruit with honeydew, Tahitian lime and guava. 
On the palate: Remarkably bright and focussed core of juicy white fruits with satiny, delicate texture and length from start to finish and crunchy, almost salty acidity running to a thrilling finish. 
RRP $25 or $21.25 per bottle in any dozen.

Tahbilk Roussanne Marsanne Viognier 2015, Nagambie Lakes

In the glass: Pale lemon green.
On the nose: Stonefruit, florals, ginger. 
On the palate: A light to medium weight and fine wine with loads of stonefruit and citrus zest underpinned by zesty acidity, mouth-coating texture and good length. 
RRP $27.95 or $23.76 per bottle in any dozen. 

Long Rail Gully Riesling 2016, Canberra District 

In the glass: Bright pale yellow straw. 
On the nose: Lime zest and fresh herb.
On the palate: Delicate yet intense and flavoursome with strong citrussy varietals and notes of talc and mineral. Mouth-feel is supple and lightly creamy with vibrant acidity. A really classic Riesling with delicious purity.
RRP $22 or $18.70 per bottle in any dozen. 

Cape Barren Sauvignon Blanc 2016, Adelaide Hills 

In the glass: Vibrant pale lemon.  
On the nose: Lime juice, nettle, grapefruit, vanilla. 
On the palate: Stylish and intense lime, passionfruit and cut grass varietals, tempered by a light nutty layer with minerally acid dryness on the finish. 
RRP $19 or $16.15 per bottle in any dozen. 

De Iuliis Special Release Grenache Rosé 2017, Hilltops

In the glass: Very fine pink with green and copper flashes. 
On the nose: Hints of pink flower and Turkish Delight. 
On the palate: Elegant and savoury with juicy fruit and green olive-like astringency creating a dry finish. 
RRP $28 or $23.80 per bottle in any dozen.

Howard Park Chardonnay 2016, Margaret River/Great Southern

In the glass: Beautifully vibrant lemon with a green hue. 
On the nose: Delicate lime juice, light stonefruit, grapefruit and cedary oak. 
On the palate: Refined yet intense with juicy layers of stonefruit and citrus with creamy yet poised acidity.
RRP $54 or $45.90 per bottle in any dozen.

Tinklers Mount Bright Semillon 2017, Hunter Valley

In the glass: Pale lemon green. 
On the nose: Bright citrus, white melon, mineral and lanolin perfume. 
On the palate: Driven by beautiful tingling acidity, it’s deliciously layered with an amazingly vibrant fruit core and quinine-like texture.
RRP $22 or $18.70 per bottle in any dozen.

Heggies Vineyard Estate Chardonnay 2015, Eden Valley

In the glass: Pale lemon, green hue. 
On the nose: Fresh yellow fruit lift with spice and grilled nut complexity. 
On the palate: Slightly spicy and strongly varietal with nectarine, green melon and marzipan, subtle background vanillin oak, fresh leesy depth and ginger spice.  
RRP $30 or $25.50 per bottle in any dozen

Gatt High Eden Riesling 2011, Eden Valley

In the glass: Pale lemon straw.
On the nose: Still vibrant lemon and lime lift with very faint hints of kero development.
On the palate: Still so youthful, pristine and precise with a multi-layered, savoury and vibrant core of fruit and just the start of secondary development. 
RRP $40 or $25.50 per bottle in any dozen.

Umamu Sparkling Chardonnay 2005, Margaret River

In the glass: Youthful lemon straw. 
On the nose: Buttered toast, preserved lemon and background smokey notes.   
On the palate: Full-bodied, layered and rich yet still vibrant with a strong undercurrent of leesy depth under a butterscotch-like core of fruit.  
RRP $63 or $53.55 per bottle in any dozen.

Bunnamagoo Estate Kids Earth Fund Autumn Semillon 2013 (375ml), Mudgee

In the glass: Medium to full gold.
On the nose: Lifted toffee, butterscotch and crème brulee. 
On the palate: Luscious and viscous, with sweet layers of candied fruit complemented by bright lemony acidity. 
RRP $25 or $21.25 per bottle in any dozen. 

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Two Blues Sauvignon Blanc 2014
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