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Wine

Margaret River’s 50th

As WA’s Margaret River wine region celebrates its 50th anniversary, we celebrate the pioneers who brought it all to fruition.

A hundred years ago, a couple of Italian immigrants arrived in the south west corner of Western Australia with some cuttings of a little-known grape variety called Fragola. These vines produced the first wines to be sold in Margaret River for the hefty price tag of two shillings a flagon. Fondly dubbed ‘red dynamite’ by the enthusiastic community, this wine was in high demand at the local dance halls where it was sold from the back of a truck. And it was said to pack quite a punch.

Times have certainly changed since then and while other growers produced small batches of wines in the ensuing years, it wasn’t until the mid 1960s when agronomist Dr John Gladstones published a report identifying Margaret River’s vast potential for viticulture, that the region, as we know it today, was born.

The Gladstones report attracted the attention of budding vignerons and medical practitioners, Thomas Cullity and Kevin and Diana Cullen. In mid 1966, the Cullens organised a meeting in the Margaret River township of Busselton inviting Dr Gladstones to speak. It was the final push those attending needed.

Soon after, the Cullens, in partnership with Tom Cullity, and Geoff and Sue Juniper, planted vines in Wilyabrup, which unfortunately didn’t survive. It was left to Cullity, who in 1967 purchased a mere eight acres of land, to plant Margaret River’s first commercial vines – Cabernet Sauvignon, Shiraz, Malbec and Riesling.

He named his venture after French sailor, Thomas Vasse, who had drowned in Geographe Bay. Hoping for better fortunes than the Frenchman, he added the Latin word for happiness – Felix. His first crop, too, was all but a disaster, decimated by birds and succumbing to bunch rot. Undeterred, but determined, Cullity persevered. In 1972, Vasse Felix won a gold medal at the Perth Show for its Riesling. The following year, gold for its Cabernet. Happy days, indeed.

The Cullens also persevered. In 1971 they planted vines on their own land where their current vineyard still thrives. At this stage, Moss Wood had been established for two years and within another two years, Cape Mentelle, Leeuwin Estate, and Woodlands had also been established. In what was a fledgling industry at the time, these founding wineries worked tirelessly to forge the region’s reputation as a premium wine producer.

“I pay tribute to the winemakers and grape growers of Margaret River,” says Dr Gladstones, who is still a proud member of the Margaret River community today.

“It’s one thing to have an idea and put it forward, it’s another this to be brought to fruition. The work and financial commitment that had to go into it has been a big factor in bringing Margaret River to its present world-class status.”

Left: Bob Hullock. Right: Cullen Wines co-founder Diana Cullen 

An American influence

While the pioneering wineries may have simply dreamed of making good wine, there was a certain Californian who knew of Margaret River’s enormous potential – Napa Valley wine baron, Robert Mondavi. As the story goes, Mondavi was searching the globe for the next great wine region. His search took him to Margaret River and a patch of land owned by Denis Horgan, a chartered accountant, and his wife Tricia. Today, it is Leeuwin Estate.

“Mondavi arrived on our doorstep wanting to buy the place,’ says Denis. “We weren’t the selling type, so he became our mentor in setting up a winery. He and his son and winemaker, Tim, came out on numerous occasions to advise on what varieties we should plant, where to plant them, about oak treatment and so on.”

Mondavi’s advice was also greatly accepted by Cullity and Kevin Cullen, who Denis befriended and met up with regularly to discuss all things wine.

“You would have sworn you were in a dog fight,” Denis says of the trio’s rendezvous. “They used to swear and curse and talk about one another’s wines, and then we’d all sit down and have lunch like we were the greatest of friends. 

“They were fabulous guys. It was the best education I could have had because they didn’t pull any punches. They set out to make wines that ranked with the best in the world, and they damn well did it.”

A region evolved

Three generations of Credaros in their Woolston vineyard

Fifty years on, Margaret River is indeed a world class wine region. While it only produces three percent of Australia’s wine, it contributes 20 per cent of our premium wine production. It is recognised internationally for exceptional Cabernets and Chardonnays, and also produces a stylish signature blend of Sauvignon Blanc and Semillon.

The handful of wineries have now boomed to over 200 with most of them producing the flagships, while also experimenting with other varietals and blends that suit the Mediterranean climate, cooling sea breezes and rich gravelly soils.

In the northern districts lies the family-owned Credaro Wines, where some of the region’s first vines were planted by the pioneering Meleri and Credaro families to produce the ‘red dynamite’. These days, they have over 140 hectares of vines spread across five vineyards and alongside the legendary Fragola, and Chardonnay, Cabernet and SBS, they are doing well with Pinot Grigio, Shiraz and Merlot.

Thompson Estate is renowned for its Chardonnays and Cabernets, but is also finding favour with its Cabernet Merlot, Malbec and famed Four Chambers Shiraz. The 20-year-old vines are organically grown and produce impressive wines under the watchful eye of Bob Cartwright of Leeuwin Estate acclaim.

Hay Shed Hill, Margaret River

At Hay Shed Hill, whose vineyards were first planted in the 1970s, the Block 6 Chardonnay is the star. Dry grown and located on a steep south facing slope, it is lean, light and fresh, but also has “flavour, aroma, body and textural interest,” says winemaker and owner, Michael Kerrigan. In concert with the Block 6, he is also giving plenty of attention to a stunning Cabernet Franc, as well as an intoxicating Shiraz Tempranillo blend.

In the cooler, southern parts of the Margaret River, Sauvignon Blanc really finds voice as a single varietal. In close proximity to the Indian Ocean, you will find Redgate Wines, a winery that takes its name from a nearby property that once had a prominent red gate and was known for the production of a rather powerful moonshine. This estate, established by the Ullinger family in 1977, produces a sublime Sauvignon Blanc that is layered with gooseberry and lime. Their Cabernet blends are also beguiling, and they have a Chenin Blanc that is also turning heads.

Even further south lies Hamelin Bay Wines, a quaint winery with a simply breathtaking outlook. It produces one of the region’s finest Sauvignon Blancs – fresh, vibrant and tropical, while their Rampant Red, a blend of Shiraz, Merlot and Cabernet, is winning fans.

Something Totally New

When Moss Wood winery was sub-divided in 1982, architect Bruce Tomlinson purchased the land and established Lenton Brae winery. Putting his talents to use, he built a striking rammed earth winery and cellar door with two towers that are home to quintet bells from Westminster and chime on the quarter-hour.

A few years ago, the Tomlinsons introduced a new varietal to the region, Pinot Blanc. This unassuming grape is a mutation of Pinot Noir, yet genetically similar to Chardonnay.

Winemaker, Edward Tomlinson, says he was drawn to the subtle charm of this early ripening variety.

“Essentially, it is a Sauvignon Blanc for grown-ups,’ he says. “The decision to plant Pinot Blanc was a big call. Having seen my father wrestle with the implications of uprooting two hectares of Pinot Noir in the early days, I was amazed at how supportive he was for me to take a punt on Pinot Blanc.”

And these are not the only newcomers to the region. There’s been an influx of plantings of Mediterranean varietals in recent years, with Fiano, Vermentino, Nebbiolo and Sangiovese finding favour amongst the growing band of winemakers.

A Fitting Half Century

As the 50th celebrations kick off in earnest, it is heartwarming to see much love given to the traditions of the pioneers.

Vasse Felix’s ‘tractor bucket’ party recreated the spirit of founding producers who celebrated each of those crucial early vintages in style with tractor buckets turned into eskys, filled with ice and wine and enjoyed out amongst the vines, even serving as a bed on some occasions.

“Anniversaries such as this are an opportunity to share with the world just how special Margaret River is. It is a wine paradise,” says current Vasse Felix owner, Paul Holmes a Court.

The single remaining bottle of the 1972 Cabernet Sauvignon Malbec is on display in the Vasse Felix vault and to celebrate the winery’s 50th anniversary, they have released a Tom Cullity Cabernet Sauvignon Malbec made from those original vines. I am sure the good doctor would approve. And while he would be astounded to see how big the region has grown, he always knew how good the wines were going to be.

“I knew because Mondavi told me so,” says Denis Horgan. “He always said that Margaret River was going to make wines that ranked with the best in the world. It was his catch cry.”

The best is still yet to come says Dr Gladstones, who fittingly gets to have the last word.

“I strongly believe that we’ve only seen the beginning,” he says. “This region has tremendous natural advantages for grape growing to produce top quality wines.

“With its environments, experience and now increasing vine age, Margaret River is undoubtedly ripe to walk with the greatest.”

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Simply Savvy
Words by Mark Hughes on 19 Dec 2016
It is fair to say that Sauvignon Blanc is the most recognisable wine ever, but Australian producers are doing their best to create a host of appealing new identities. We find out who is doing what to make drinkers swipe right. I’ll come right out and say it. I quite like Sauvignon Blanc. That statement will probably earn me the ire of a few wine critics that I know, but I reckon it is a sassy and wondrous wine, and deserving of far more than the limited adulation we give it. I’d be as bold as to say it has been unfairly heaped with harsh criticism. There are a few reasons as to why Sauvignon Blanc is the kid the rest of the class picks on. Firstly, Sauvignon Blanc is seen as a pretty simple wine – it really is a case of WYSIWYG – What You ‘Smell’ Is What You Get and Sauv Blanc has an unmistakable tropical aroma. No matter where it is grown, it will always smell like Sauv Blanc, and this leads to the second reason why it is ridiculed. Because it is so recognisable, it is the first wine that drinkers new to the game can accurately identify. And for the well-heeled wine critic, that is just so ho-hum. Thirdly, it is popular, and we all know Australians hate anything that is popular. It is so well-liked for the two reasons given above. It is appealing for the novice wine drinker, particularly young women, as its simple tropical and punchy profile is not too dissimilar to the flavour of juices and fruit punches we enjoy drinking as teenagers. And it is popular because the novice wine drinker can identify it. Not only does that give them a sense of assurance that the wine experience they are about to have is going to be an enjoyable one, but it also gives them a sense of pride about their burgeoning wine knowledge. And finally, it is because New Zealand has had phenomenal success with the varietal and Aussies just can’t put that Trans Tasman rivalry to bed. It is a wonder we are still playing rugby given the dominance the All Blacks have had over us this millennium, and for the foreseeable future.   ANOTHER POINT OF VIEW Having said all of that, Australian winemakers are a hardy bunch (even more so than the Wallaby scrum) and they have been busy creating a unique identity for Aussie Sauv Blanc that will have a point of difference from Kiwi SB and be just as popular, or even more popular. “I think Australian Sauvignon Blanc tends to be leaner than NZ wines, lower in alcohol with less residual sugar,” says McWilliam’s winemaker Adrian Sparks, whose High Altitude Sauvignon Blanc from the Orange wine region topped our State of Play tasting. “It is a crisper, more refreshing style of wine. This is what we try to achieve, but you want the wine to say where it is from. “I would hate to see wines from Margaret River , Adelaide Hills and Orange all looking the same. Regional differences are important.” Dan Berrigan, winemaker at Berrigan Wines and avid Sauv Blanc lover agrees. “As an Aussie winemaker, I try to understand what makes the NZ Sauv Blanc so popular, and emulate those characters in my wine,” he explains. “I then weave in the regional Mt Benson personality, which is usually in the form of more fruit weight on the palate, and I feel that it’s this combination that drinkers really appreciate, and are drawn to as a point of difference.”   BETTER WITH AGE Shane Harris, chief winemaker at Wines by Geoff Hardy in the Adelaide Hills makes another good point – we have only been growing and making Sauvignon Blanc for the last decade or two. After a slow start, we are growing better fruit and getting better at making good wine out of it. “When the Sauv Blanc train came to town, lots of the industry was fixated on turning the volume up to 11 on the varietal character, but somewhere along the line, the focus on site was lost and replaced with maximising varietal character with picking times and yeast selection based on volume of varietal character more than reflection of site,” says Shane. “More and more Australian winemakers are learning how to get the best out of the fruit sources they have available to them. Sauv Blanc has a great ability to show the site it comes from if you let it.” “I love Australian wine due to the vast differences in climate and styles. We are so fortunate in that fact and more so than any other country,” adds Adrian. “The altitude of Orange is the key, with its warm days and cool nights allowing the grapes to ripen slowly, retaining wonderful acidity and not tending to have full blown tropical fruit, rather a lovely combination of citrus, herbs and exotic notes.”   TINKERING THE TECHNIQUE So what are some of the techniques winemakers are using and what result does it have on the wine? Overall, the answer seems to be to bring Sauv Blanc some complexity. “Winemaking begins in the vineyard,” says Dan. “With the Berrigan Sauvignon Blanc this means managing the canopy to achieve fruit with a balance of tropical and grassy flavours. “In the winery, you then need to extend the skin contact time of the must to ensure that those flavours you’ve worked hard for in the vineyard are extracted from the skins and into the juice. From there, it’s all about minimising the extraction of phenolics, while maximising flavour retention and balance in your wine without oak maturation, lees stirring or fining.” “Oak with the right fruit works very well,” says Adrian conversely. “Lees contact providing texture and depth and some wild fermentation all are providing layers of complexity.” “Sauv Blanc responds to as little to as much winemaking as you wish to give it. Whether that response is appropriate depends on the site and the intended style,” explains Shane. “This doesn’t mean that just because you can do something that you should! A level of restraint is required to bring the subtle characters from your little patch of earth. “For our site I find that some skin contact time, leaving the juice slightly cloudy, and yeast selection are the most important areas of my input. Some post primary fermentation lees contact also helps, but this varies vintage to vintage. “The ability to change and adapt to vintage variation and change your approach is required to get the best out of the variety. Following what you did last year isn’t good enough if you want to get the best out of it this year.”   THE FUTURE While critics predict the popularity of Sauvignon Blanc cannot last, our winemakers seem to believe it will be here for quite some time to come. “The wine style is just so strong in its personality, and with the majority of Australians living in warm, sunny coastal regions, the freshness of Sauvignon Blanc will always have its place amongst our lifestyles,” says Dan. It will always be popular as it’s such an easy drink and suited to Australia’s summer climate,” agrees Adrian. “I hope as an industry we can move with the ebb and flow of consumer preferences and make moves to deliver a style that is relevant and current,” says Shane. “We have to learn to not flog the horse too hard and kill the market and burn the variety, we need to be more sensitive to changes in consumer preferences and move with it, not fight against it. “Keep it fresh, keep it relevant.” Top 20 Sauvignon Blanc 2016 McWilliam’s Wines High Altitude Sauvignon Blanc 2015 (Orange) Scotchmans Hill Sauvignon Blanc 2015 (Geelong)  Henschke & Co Coralinga Sauvignon Blanc 2015 (Adelaide Hills)  Berrigan Wines Sauvignon Blanc 2016 (Mount Benson)  Taylors Wines Sauvignon Blanc 2015 (Adelaide Hills)  Blue Pyrenees Estate Sauvignon Blanc 2015 (Pyrenees)  Redgate Reserve Sauvignon Blanc (Oak Matured) 2014 (Margaret River) Silkwood Wines The Walcott Sauvignon Blanc 2016 (Pemberton)  Tamar Ridge Sauvignon Blanc 2016 (Tamar Valley) Dominique Portet Fontaine Sauvignon Blanc 2015 (Yarra Valley) Howard Park Sauvignon Blanc 2015 (Margaret River) Alkoomi Sauvignon Blanc 2016 (Frankland River) Dandelion Vineyards Wishing Clock Sauvignon Blanc 2015 (Adelaide Hills) Wangolina Station Sauvignon Blanc 2016 (Mount Benson) Geoff Hardy Wines K1 Sauvignon Blanc 2016 (Adelaide Hills) Cherubino Sauvignon Blanc 2016 (Pemberton) Eden Road Single Vineyard Sauvignon Blanc 2015 (Canberra District) d’Arenberg The Broken Fishplate Sauvignon Blanc 2015 (Adelaide Hills) Lambrook Wines Sauvignon Blanc 2016 (Adelaide Hills) Nannup Ridge Firetower Sauvignon Blanc 2015 (Blackwood River)
Wine
The Best McLaren Vale Wineries and Cellar Doors 2019
Pristine ocean views, exceptional wine blends, an abundance of new varieties… what’s not to love about the birthplace of the SA wine industry? Take a tour of the best McLaren Vale wineries and cellar doors for 2019 with this guide from Wine Selectors. Home to some of the world’s oldest grapevines and with over 80 cellar doors and vineyards accessible just 45 minutes from Adelaide, McLaren Vale is a wine-lovers dream. Nestled between the Mount Lofty Ranges and the beaches of Gulf St Vincent, this region is the gateway to the stunning Fleury Peninsula, evocative of the stunning coastline around Lisbon, Portugal. This warm, Mediterranean-style climate and proximity to the sea goes a long way to explaining the fantastic range of Spanish, Italian and Portuguese varieties on offer throughout the region. Alongside the deservedly celebrated Tempranillo , Zinfandel, Sangiovese , Vermentino, Fiano and Touriga Nacional varieties on offer, a sense of adventurism abounds in the countless alternative varieties and superior red wine blends coming from the region, with something new to discover at every winery and cellar door. Trent Mannell, Wine Selector’s Tasting Panellist and Wine Show Judge is effusive in his love for McLaren Vale region. “It’s a region where the vines meet the sea, so it has a unique coastal vibe and the wines reflect the influence of the maritime climate. The cellar doors are so peaceful; it’s the most tranquil wine region I know.” Read on for Wine Selector’s picks for the best McLaren Vale wineries and cellar doors for 2019, and discover more about the wines you can explore in our McLaren Vale region guide . The Best McLaren Vale Wineries Hither & Yon Built from the soil up and lovingly curated by a truly invested team, Hither & Yon celebrates not just the rolling nature of the region, but the easy-going nature of the Brothers Leask and this family-and-friend run business. Their cellar door – originally an 1860s Willunga butcher’s shop – retains its local slate flooring and limestone walls, yet has been refreshed to reflect the artisanal vibe of a vine to table sensibility. With wine tastings, cheese platters, and a fireplace to kick back and savour a fine Shiraz, Grenache, Cabernet Sauvignon, Malbec, Petit Blanc or Nero D’Avola (among others), Hither & Yon emphasises sustainable grape-growing that celebrates the geography and maritime influence of McLaren Vale. 17 High St, Willunga Open Daily 11 am to 4 pm Visit the Hither & Yon website SHOTTESBROOKE The Shottesbrooke story actually begins just outside the South Australian hamlet of Myponga, with the quality fruit produced by founder Nick Holmes. A new era for the label began when he purchased a McLaren Flat property, where the Shottesbrooke winery and cellar door were built and some of McLaren Vale’s most exciting wines were brought to life. Nestled amongst the company vineyards with magnificent view to the surrounding Mount Lofty Ranges, the cellar door offers a diverse range of excellent wines made at the winery right next door, presented by a passionate and experienced staff. You can make a day of it with an all-inclusive full-day tour , and take a journey into the heart of the winemaker’s craft; or, stroll through the estate vineyards for a three-course lunch prepared by the award-winning chefs at The Currant Shed, best enjoyed alongside a hand selected range of matched Shottesbrooke wines. 101 Bagshaws Road, McLaren Flat Open Daily 10 am to 4.30 pm, Sat – Sun 11 am to 5 pm Visit the Shottesbrooke website D’ARENBERG d’Arenberg  is a McLaren Vale institution with d’Arry Osborn and his son Chester, Chief Winemaker, renowned for their fantastic Shiraz and Grenache. Formerly housed in a beautifully restored 19 th -century homestead, the d’Arenberg cellar door has now soared into a bold new era with the daring d’Arenberg Cube, a multi-venue experience that is home to masterclasses, à la carte or degustation dining, as well as a contemporary art museum. You can even play winemaker for the day, blending and bottling your own wine. And, of course, you can also explore an extensive range of quality wines, guided by their always entertaining cellar door staff. Learn more about The Cube in our interview with Chester , and explore The d’Arenberg Experience at their website. Osborn Rd, McLaren Vale Open Daily 10 am to 5 pm Visit the d’Arenberg website BATTLE OF BOSWORTH Want to learn how organic wines are cultivated? Then make sure to stop by this charming cellar door and sample the wares of boutique winemaker Joch Bosworth, who took the reins of the family business back in 1995 and drove a return to the old ways. Such pride in tradition is suitably reflected in quality examples of Shiraz, Chardonnay, Cabernet Sauvignon and Touriga Nacional. Located just outside the historic township of Willunga, the cellar door occupies a restored 1850s stable with views over the vineyards and west to St Vincent. 92 Gaffney Rd, Willunga Open Daily 11 am to 5 pm Visit the Battle of Bosworth website HUGH HAMILTON WINES A sweeping, 270-degree view of one of McLaren Vale’s signature vineyards awaits you at the Hugh Hamilton Wines cellar door, a must-stop for anyone visiting the region. Recognised as Australia’s oldest wine family, the passion and knowledge of the cellar door staff is on clear display and the range on offer is exceptional with everything from a classic Shiraz through to the exciting new blends and alternative varieties the region is so rightfully famous for. Our tip? Book a hosted wine and cheese flight of their single vineyard wines for a trip you’ll always savour. 94 McMurtrie Rd, McLaren Vale Open Daily 11 am to 5 pm Visit the Hugh Hamilton website GEMTREE WINES Gemtree Wines  operates on a simple philosophy – minimal intervention in the winemaking process, and a more eco-conscious farming system. The result is a range of wines which are powerful, concentrated, and expressive of the true characteristics of each grape variety and the region. The relaxed and unassuming outlook created by husband and wife duo Mike and Melissa permeates every aspect of the cellar door experience, which features views all the way to the sea from their outdoor verandah. Sample their fantastic wines while learning more about  organic  and biodynamic farming practices, and make sure you take the time to explore the 10-hectare wetland eco-trail while you’re there. 167 Elliott Rd, McLaren Flat Open Daily 11 am to 5 pm Visit the Gemtree website LECONFIELD & RICHARD HAMILTON WINES Looking for the perfect place to sample Richard Hamilton’s Estate, Single Vineyard Reserve and select Leconfield wines? Then set a course for Leconfield cellar door , where you can appreciate the natural qualities imparted by the family-owned vineyards in McLaren Vale as well as the vines surrounding the cellar door itself. With its sweeping lawns and verandahs plus generous platters of local regional food on offer, Leconfield will delight the senses. Find out more about Chief Winemaker Paul Gordon’s process in our Wine Selectors Q&A. 439 Main Rd, McLaren Vale Open Daily 10 am to 5 pm Visit the Leconfield & Richard Hamilton Wines website SERAFINO Steve (Serafino) Maglieri arrived in Adelaide in 1964 as a teenager from Italy with little more than a passionate dream to make great wine. After many highs and a few lows in the wine industry, eventually the Serafino label emerged and the Maglieri family was able to craft their own piece of paradise amongst the gumtrees of their McLaren Vale winery. The warm, friendly and familiar ethos of Serafino is evident in the cellar door, charming restaurant, and four-star accommodation, making it the perfect place to position yourself for a weekend getaway… the better to enjoy Serafino’s great range of Italian and alternative varieties such as the Bellissimo series of Vermentino, Fiano and Montepulciano through to reserve Grenache and Shiraz. Kangarilla Rd, McLaren Vale Open Daily 10 am to 4:30 pm Visit the Serafino website OLIVER'S TARANGA Contained within an original 1850s stone worker’s cottage built by the first generation of the Oliver family, Oliver’s Taranga cellar door retains both an authentic charm and a deserved reputation for exceptional wines. In addition to its excellent range of Shiraz and Cabernet Sauvignon you’ll also find small batch wonders like Fiano, Grenache, Mencia and Sagrantino to delight the palate. Planning a visit? Be sure to check their events page before you go, as the venue hosts many unique food and wine events to enjoy, including monthly Porchetta Parties, Twilight Pizza events, and even pop-up happenings in Adelaide.  246 Seaview Rd, McLaren Vale Open Daily 10 am to 4 pm Visit the Oliver’s Taranga website CORIOLE Set within sight of the sea amidst the undulating McLaren Vale hills, this small boutique cellar door can be found in an old 1860s ironstone barn, surrounded by the Coriole Estate vineyards which are celebrating their 50 th birthday this year. Famous for its pioneering efforts in introducing alternative varieties to the region – most notably Sangiovese in 1985 and the first Australian Fiano in 2005 – Coriole’s range has an impressive diversity that includes Sangiovese, Barbera, Picpoul, Nero d’Avola, Fiano, as well as exquisite examples of the classic Shiraz and Cabernet Sauvignon varieties. If you’re lucky, you may even get to sample a rare single vineyard Shiraz, or perhaps a Mourvedre. It’s only a small cellar door so if you’re travelling in a group of eight or more you will need to book. Chaffeys Rd, McLaren Vale Mon – Fri 10 am to 5 pm, Sat – Sun 11 am to 5 pm Visit the Coriole website PENNY'S HILL This charming winery, set on the stunning grounds of the historic Ingleburn property, is the perfect place to stop for a long lunch during your travels through McLaren Vale. Two Forks recipient Chef Tom Boden has crafted a menu celebrating the artisan food producers of the region at the Kitchen Door Restaurant, presenting classic meals prepared in contemporary style. After your meal, wander through the Red Dot Gallery or soak up the farm yard atmosphere and chat with the chooks. The talents of celebrated Winemaker Alexia Roberts, winner of 2016’s World’s Best Cabernet at the Concours International des Cabernets in France, are on fine display with elegant, fruit-driven, single-vineyard estate-grown wines that display the very best qualities of McLaren Vale wines. 281 Main Rd, McLaren Vale Open Daily 10 am to 5 pm Visit the Penny’s Hill website MORE INFORMATION Before visiting McLaren Vale, be sure to check out the official  McLaren Vale region website  or stop by the McLaren Vale & Fleurieu Visitor Information Centre in the centre of town. Or, if you’d like to sample some of the wineries listed in this guide prior to setting out, explore our wide selection of McLaren Vale wines and learn more about the wineries listed here in our  Meet the Makers section . With the Wine Selectors Regional Release program, you'll experience a different wine region each release with all wines expertly selected by our Tasting Panel. Plus, you’ll receive comprehensive tasting notes and fascinating insights into each region. Visit our  Regular Deliveries  page to find out more, and explore more great wine regions with our Wine Selector’s Cellar Door Guides . Enjoy!
Two Blues Sauvignon Blanc 2014
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