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Wine

Meet Chester Osborn from d’Arenberg

The Wine Selectors Wine of the Month for October is the d’Arenberg The Broken Fishplate Sauvignon Blanc 2014. So we caught up with its maker, the man of many shirts, Chester Osborn.

You’re a finalist in the Entrepreneur of the Year National Awards – how does that feel?

I feel quite honoured, however, at the end of the day I’m just doing what I love. It’s not work. If it’s worth doing it’s worth doing well.

Can you recall the first wine you tried?

It was probably a flagon wine when I was about four years old. I also remember that at around seven I tasted the so-called good reds and I didn’t like them. The fortified white Muscat was nice though.

When did you fall in love with wine?

At the age of seven I decided I wanted to be a winemaker, so I guess I was in love with wine even if I didn’t like much of it.

It’s a hard call but do you have a favourite wine or varietal?

I suppose it would be Nebbiolo from Piedmont. However, Grenache from McLaren Vale or Priorat are right up there.

How do you come up with your wine names?

It used to be never before 2am. Now it’s sitting on the toilet first thing in the morning reading the dictionary.

How has your dad d’Arry influenced you?

From time to time dad talks about how he used to do things, which puts his wines in perspective. Most of todays’ wines and the winemaking are the same as then but with more control. Dad was also frugal with money, which has been good in making me justify every expense. It has been a great working relationship. Often he worries, but what was planned more or less always occurs.

White, red or both?

At d’Arenberg we produce 72 wines from 37 grape varieties – all colours are accounted for.

What do you do when you’re not making wine?

Lately the d’Arenberg Cube has been taking up an enormous amount of time, especially the art installations but also all of the intricate architecture and engineering. Lots of wine tasting and drinking also fill my days and nights, and I have a heap of other projects on the go.

How many shirts do you really have?

We ran a competition recently asking exactly this question, it turned out to be 372.

What is your favourite….

Pizza topping: Salami with a bit of spice and other meats
Shirt: Robert Graham limited edition
Book: Science Illustrated or Cosmos
Movie/TV show: Science fiction
Restaurant: El Celler de Can Roca, Spain
Dinner: Fish amok
Time of day/night: all day, no preferences
Sporting team: Norwood football club. My great grandfather JR Osborn started d’Arenberg and the Norwood football club.
Christmas present: Art or sculpture
Childhood memory: Making things like planes and cars
Holiday destination: Spanish cities or French country villages
Angle to view the d’Arenberg Cube: Seaview Road

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World's Best Rieslings
Words by Trent Mannell on 14 Feb 2017
Wine Selectors tasting Panelist Trent Mannell was asked to be judge at the 17th Canberra International Riesling Challenge, and he liked what he saw. Someone recently asked me what I thought the big trends in wine will be in 2017. And while I believe alternative varietals will continue to gain momentum I feel that an old favourite, Riesling   , will rise again to become one of the most popular wines on the market. I’ve come to this conclusion after a stint as Panel Chair judge at the 17th Canberra International Riesling Challenge, where I was blown away by the quality, variety and consistency of Rieslings from around the world, and equally by the Australian examples, which are right there in the top echelon. Given the fact that most international wine tastings of this nature are held in Europe, the UK or America, it is a coup that we have a tasting of this kind in our own backyard. Nearly all of the credit for this has to go to winemaker Ken Helm from Helm Wines in the  Canberra District  . Ken is about as knowledgeable and passionate about Riesling as anyone I know and we’ve had many a long conversation about the many nuances of this wonderful varietal while sipping some wonderful examples from Ken’s winery in Murrumbatmen. The thing about Riesling is it is so versatile – by controlling when it is picked and how much sugar is in the grape, it can be made in almost any style from dry and citrusy to sweet and syrupy. All have their place and appeal and all were on show at the Canberra International Riesling Challenge. JUDGING RIESLING ROYALTY The 2017 event featured an outstanding collection of wines from eight countries with record numbers. Record entries (512) as well as the hughest participation from Austria and Australia and the largest number of entries from Germany and the USA since 2009, and in a strong sign of the quality on show, a record number of medals awarded. There were 85 Gold Medals, 112 Silver Medals and 168 Bronze Medals – a medal strike rate of 72%; this is up from 65% in 2015. Gold Medals represented 17% of entries - a record for the Challenge, clearly a reflection of the outstanding 2015 and 2016 vintages in the Southern Hemisphere and some fine winegrowing and winemaking skills. “It is indeed an exciting time for Riesling across the world,” Ken said at the Challenge. Like me, he reckons that there is an increased appetite for Riesling and once these award-winning wines hit the market they’ll be greeted with much joy. For the record Austrailan wines excelled. The Best Wine of the 2016 Challenge was Ferngrove Wines from the Frankland River region in WA for their  Ferngrove  Off-Dry Riesling Limited Release 2016  . The best dry Riesling went to  Adelaide Hills  winery Bird in Hand for their  Bird in Hand Riesling 2016  , made from pristine  Clare Valley  fruit, while the Best Museum Riesling was awarded to the Robert Stein Riesling 2009 from Mudgee. A VERSATILE VARIETY The fact that three different regions around Australia is tip of the hat to the versatility of the varietal to shine in different conditions and a testament to the heightened professionalism and attention to detail by winemakers and viticulturists. Germany’s Weingut Georg Müller Stiftung - 2015 Hattenheimer Hassel Riesling Trockenbeerenauslese picked up two awards – the Best Sweet Riesling and the Best European Riesling, while the Mount Majura Vineyard Riesling 2016, scored for Best Riesling from the Canberra District. For all the results visit www.rieslingchallenge.com And can I give me thanks and gratitude to Ken, who is stepping down as Chair of the CIRC after 17 years at the helm. If it were not for his tireless work in instigating and perpetuating this Challenge we wouldn’t be talking about these Rieslings now, and you wouldn’t be ready to taste them. Cheers Ken, here’s to our next glass of off-dry and our chat on your creaky verandah.
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Meet Tom Carson of Yabby Lake
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What is your favourite… Book ? Girt by David Hunt – every Australian should read this book and True Girt. Movie ? Alien. TV show? Game of Thrones. Restaurant?  Kisume. Breakfast ? Coffee. Lunch?  Long. Dinner? In summer a barbeque eating outside and enjoying a few nice wines. Time of day/night?  Morning. Sporting team?  Essendon FC. Beer?  Proper Italian brewed and canned Peroni Nastro Azzurro – not that rubbish they brew and bottle here, it is a scandal and should be exposed.
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Two Blues Sauvignon Blanc 2014
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