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Wine

Meet Ninth Island Winemaker Luke Whittle

To celebrate the Ninth Island Pinot Grigio 2016 from the Tamar Valley being the November Wine of the Month, we caught up with winemaker Luke Whittle to talk Tasmania, cool climate wines, and Pinot G.

You are originally from New Zealand where you started your winemaking career, plus you’ve done vintages in Canada, Germany and Central Victoria –  what drew you to Tasmania?

Ultimately, my passion to get back to cool climate wines, and Tasmania’s reputation for amazing wines and produce. I see a huge amount of potential for the Tasmanian wine industry as the region continues to produce world-class Sparkling and table wines and grow its reputation both domestically and abroad. I think the next decade will be a very exciting time for the industry here and I want to be a part of that future.

What makes the Tamar Valley such a special region?

The unique maritime climate, sheltered from the prevailing westerly winds resulting in consistency of ripening.  We’re situated on a beautiful big sweeping bend of the Tamar, which is not only an amazing place for grapes, but a beautiful setting for a vineyard with vine covered slopes rolling down to the water. It’s like a scene from an old-world region in Europe with a distinctly Tasmanian twist.

Our Wine of the Month is the Ninth Island 2016 Pinot Grigio – what is it about cool climate wines that you like so much?

In a word: elegance ­–  the way they are so fresh and expressive yet full of finesse.

In our food and wine matching calendar, we’ve paired it with a quick chicken cassoulet with preserved lemon – what’s your choice of food partner?

Coming from the coast of NZ, I’m really drawn to the amazing bounty of seafood here in Tasmania, and I love freediving. So combining those passions, I’d pair it with fresh barbeque crayfish and wasabi aioli, especially with the opening of the crayfish season just around the corner.

What makes cool climate wines like Pinot G so food-friendly?

The cool climate acidity lends itself to so many possibilities, especially when combined with the Pinot Grigios texture and delicate but expressive aromatics.

What’s your favourite wine memory?

The next one…

Other than your own wine, what wine do you like to drink at home?

I like to mix it up. Recently it’s been Riesling, especially some of the dryer style Rieslings out of Germany, something I fell in love with over my time working in the Mosel and the Pfalz.

What are your three top recommendations for a first-time visitor to the area?

  • Hit the incredible Tasmanian coastline! I’d suggest to go up to the top end of the east coast, where you’ll find no crowds, and amazingly beautiful beaches.
  • The Tamar Valley Wine Route, which we are a part of – the perfect way to sample a number of delicious Tassie wines.  
  • Head into Launceston to Stillwater Restaurant. The menu features Tasmanian produce and they’re known for an incredible wine list highlighting Tasmanian wine.

What’s your favourite …

Way to spend time off? In the ocean.

Holiday destination? Whangamata, my hometown, for a dose of NZ summer.

Wine and food match? Pinot and duck… it just needs to happen

Sporting team? All Blacks (of course)

Movie?  Anchorman – one of the classics

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Two Blues Sauvignon Blanc 2014
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