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Wine

Meet Tom Carson of Yabby Lake

With the popularity of Australian Pinot G continuing to climb, we chat with Yabby Lake general manager and winemaker, Tom Carson, whose Red Claw Pinot Gris 2016 is so deliciously food-friendly.

Along with being an award-winning winemaker, you’re also heavily involved with the Australian wine show circuit – including holding the position of Chairman of the Royal Melbourne Wine Show. What’s exciting you most about Australian wine?

Australian wine is in a wonderful period at the moment, there are so many small producers producing stunning wine. As we have seen at the Royal Melbourne Wine Awards, this year a Grenache won the most coveted Trophy in Australian wine, the Jimmy Watson Trophy. Grenache is a wonderful variety and produces stunning wines, particularly from the incredible old vine resources of South Australia – couple this with a modern, sensitive approach to winemaking and we are finally realising the potential of this variety.

You’ve worked in multiple wine regions across Australia and France, and this year celebrate ten years at Yabby Lake –  what drew you to Yabby Lake and the Mornington Peninsula?  

Yabby Lake is a stunning property and is an amazing vineyard site. It was the unrealised potential of this site that really drew me in – just imagining what was possible with this vineyard had me hooked, and 10 years on that hasn’t changed.

Fruit for the Red Claw Pinot Gris 2016 was harvested in early February 2016, which is quite early for the Mornington Peninsula! How’s vintage 2018 looking? 

Yes, 2016 was the earliest vintage we have ever experienced here, picking 10 days earlier than ever before. 2018 is shaping up nicely and we should be harvesting late February this year!

Both Pinot Gris and Pinot Grigio have really found their place in the Australian wine market – what is it about Pinot G that makes it so popular?

It is a wine that is easy to connect with – it’s subtle, finely detailed, but also wonderfully drinkable and really suits that summer weather when you are craving something refreshing but also interesting.

What makes the Red Claw Pinot Gris stand out from the crowd?

Red Claw Mornington Peninsula Pinot Gris captures the variety and region in a way that just draws you in and makes you an instant fan.

What is your all-time favourite wine memory (other than a wine itself)?

I remember when l was very young, maybe 5 years-old, treading grapes in a garbage bin and thinking what great fun it was getting covered in wine and grapes. It’s funny how things work out!

Other than your own wine, what is the wine that you like to drink at home?

I am massive fan of Yarra Valley Chardonnay, particularly from Oakridge, old vine McLaren Vale Grenache from S.C. Pannell, and Nebbiolo from Italy.

What is your ultimate food and wine match?
Chinese roast duck and Pinot Noir! Yes, it is a bit of a cliché, but have you tried it?

What do you do to relax when you’re away from the winery?
On a golf course! Well, l try to anyway, but that depends on how the game is going!

Your must-do for visitors to the Mornington Peninsula.
Peninsula hot springs in winter.

Beach in summer.

Golf in autumn and spring.

What is your favourite…

Book?

Girt by David Hunt – every Australian should read this book and True Girt.

Movie?

Alien.

TV show?

Game of Thrones.

Restaurant? 

Kisume.

Breakfast?

Coffee.

Lunch? 

Long.

Dinner?

In summer a barbeque eating outside and enjoying a few nice wines.

Time of day/night? 

Morning.

Sporting team? 

Essendon FC.

Beer? 

Proper Italian brewed and canned Peroni Nastro Azzurro – not that rubbish they brew and bottle here, it is a scandal and should be exposed.

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