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Tahbilk | Wines of the Season

History

Established in 1860, Tahbilk is located in the premium central Victorian viticultural region of Nagambie Lakes. Purchased by Reginald Purbrick in 1925, five generations of the Purbrick family have been actively involved in Tahbilk, bringing a tradition of pride, hard work and a love of good wine to their unique heritage of being the oldest family owned winery and vineyard in Victoria.

Tasting Notes

Tahbilk has a rich history with each of the varietals in this blend, with Marsanne plantings dating back to 1927 and Viognier and Roussanne under vine for 15 and 25 years respectively. The 2015 vintage, winner of a Trophy, two Gold medals, three Silvers and 10 Bronze is unctuous and textural with citrus and rose petal aromas gracing a palate of honeysuckle, apricot and almond hints with a pronounced mineral edge, fresh acidity and a lingering finish. 

The 2015 Vintage

While there was above average rainfall during June and July, it was sporadic during the following months. Notwithstanding the unstable weather, the vineyards remained healthy and disease free – amazing considering the forecast conditions. Vintage itself started early – mid February – and continued apace until a lull in ripening early March that allowed the winery to catch up.

+ Food

This luscious blend is ideal with rich dishes such as creamy soups and shellfish. We recommend Chicken, thyme and mushroom pie.

254 O'Neils Road, Tabilk, Vic
tahbilk.com.au
03 5794 2555

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