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Wine

Top Five Wineries and Cellar Doors to visit in Coonawarra

Discover the best of Coonawarra’s wineries and cellar doors to taste and experience the region’s delights with our guide and interactive map.

Australia’s ‘other red centre’, Coonawarra is 450kms from Melbourne and 370kms from Adelaide, and is located in the heart of South Australia’s Limestone Coast.

The region boasts some of the most sought-after vineyard soil in Australia, and with vineyards positioned just 80kms from the Southern Ocean, the vines are assured of a long, cool ripening period producing wines of fantastic balance, richness, intensity and longevity.

It’s thanks to Scottish pioneer John Riddoch, who noticed the fertility of the regions’ famed terra rossa way back in 1890, that we can enjoy some of the world’s best Cabernet Sauvignon and Shiraz.

Today, the region is home to a mix of old winemaking families and fresh new talent, and has over 25 cellar doors to visit which all offer wonderfully friendly and delicious experiences.

Here are our top five Coonawarra wineries

Di Giorgio Family Wines

Don’t miss out on visiting the family owned and operated Di Giorgio Family Wines. Their winery is the second oldest in the district, and their Coonawarra vineyard boasts some gnarly old vines that are over 115 years old.

Along with producing premium wines from Coonawarra and Lucindale, the DiGiorgio family sources specific varietal fruit from different areas of the Limestone Coast where they believe the terroir is best suited to the variety.

At Di Giorgio’s cellar door, you’re invited to taste a selection of premium wines from their extensive portfolio, plus don’t miss out on their delicious olive oils and the fabulous range of local cheeses. The shaded outdoor seating area is the perfect place to enjoy a glass of wine with a ‘pick your own produce’ platter.

14918 Riddoch Highway, Coonawarra

Open daily 10am to 5pm. Closed Good Friday, Christmas Day and Boxing Day

Visit Di Giorgio Wines website

Katnook Estate

Located just 6 kilometres north of Penola on the Riddoch Highway, Katnook Estate’s historic cellar door was first built in the late 1800s by the founder of the Coonawarra wine region, John Riddoch.  

Today, the beautifully renovated building features locally sourced stone and timbers and provides a wonderful environment to sample a range of Katnook’s premium wines, along with platters of local cheeses. 

If you’re visiting during winter, the cosy lounge area with its open fireplace is the perfect place to warm-up and unwind.  Adjacent to the cellar door is the award-winning 'terra rossa pit', where you can get up close and personal with Coonawarra's famous soil profile and learn why it’s so important to flavour of the region’s wines.

Riddoch Highway, Coonawarra

Open weekdays 10am to 5pm, weekends 12pm to 5pm. Closed Good Friday and Christmas Day 

Visit the Katnook Estate website

Leconfield Wines

Owned by one of Australia’s original winemaking families, Leconfield Wines is situated just a stones-throw from Katnook Estate along the Riddoch Highway.

Built in 1974 by Sydney Hamilton, the limestone winery building has an impressive barrel storage of 2000 barrels, predominantly sourced from France.  Once inside the winery, you’ll be welcomed to the intimate tasting room where you can sample the Leconfield and Richard Hamilton ranges while watching the winemaking team at work.

15454 Riddoch Highway, Coonawarra

Open weekdays 10am to 4:30pm, weekends and public holidays 11am to 4pm.

Visit Leconfield Wines website

Rymill Coonawarra

Rymill Coonawarra was established in 1974 by Peter Rymill, the great grandson of John Riddoch who was the founder of Coonawarra. Embracing the pioneering spirit of his forefathers, Peter planted a diverse range of varieties and built a stunning, high-tech winery that is still home to Rymill Coonawarra today.

A must-visit destination of the region, the Rymill Coonawarra’s spacious cellar door boasts internal viewing platforms to watch the workings of the winery and external balconies that overlook the beautiful tree lined grounds.

Take a behind-the-scenes look at the winery while sampling their range of 100% estate grown wines, then step outside to the gorgeous grounds to enjoy a local produce platter or grazing plate.

Riddoch Highway, Coonawarra

Open daily 11am to 5pm. Closed Christmas Day

Visit Rymill’s website

Wynns Coonawarra Estate

Wynns Coonwarra Estate is one of the region’s leading producers and largest single vineyard holder with the longest established vineyard sites in Coonawarra.

What is now Wynns Coonawarra Estate was founded by Scottish pioneer John Riddoch, who in 1891 planted along the famed terra rossa strip and completed the estate's now iconic three-gabled winery in 1896.

Riddoch died in 1901 and Coonawarra languished for the first half of this century. The region’s revival began in 1951 when wine merchants Samuel and David Wynns purchased Riddoch's original vineyards and winery and renamed the property Wynns Coonawarra Estate.

The Wynns recognised the amazing qualities of Coonawarra wines and set out to establish an independent identity in the region. They created the famous label that has made John Riddoch's winery one of Australia's most-recognised buildings.

77 Memorial Drive, Coonawarra

Open daily 10am to 5pm. Closed Christmas Day.

Visit Wynns Coonawarra Estate website

Zema Estate

Established in 1982, Zema Estate is a boutique winery owned and operated by three generations of the Zema family.

Their modern cellar door overlooks beautiful hand prune vines and offers a wonderfully friendly and authentic experience. All current release wines are available for tasting, plus a stunning selection of cellar door only and museum release wines.

You can also indulge in Mrs Zema’s estate-grown and homemade olive oil and chilli paste, and other delicious gourmet produce and that are sourced locally or imported from Italy.  

Partial to a good party, the Zema’s also host regular events where you can enjoy Mrs Zema’s fantastic Italian fare of pizza, pasta and arancini while being entertained by local musicians. Keep your diary open for upcoming events including the After Dark – Vintage Celebrations (April), Cellar Dwellers (July), Coonawarra Cabernet Celebrations (October).

14944 Riddoch Highway, Coonawarra

Open weekdays 9am to 5pm, weekends 10am to 4pm. Closed Good Friday and Christmas Day.

Visit Zema Estate’s website

Coonawarra Wineries Walking Trail

For those who are up to combining a bit of exercise with their wine tasting, the Coonawarra Wineries Walking Trail offers a great opportunity to enjoy the great outdoors and explore the vineyards.

Coonawarra Winery Map

Planning a trip to Coonawarra? Download our interactive Coonawarra winery map. To save on your browser or device, click here

 

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Check Out the Best Barossa Valley Wineries
There’s a fantastic range of Barossa wineries and cellar doors to visit just outside of Adelaide. And, to help plan your trip to this internationally renowned wine region we’ve selected a collection of wineries that provide the best cellar door experience plus we’ve included a handy interactive map down below . A trip to the Barossa allows you to visit two world class wine regions on the same day, the Barossa Valley and the Eden Valley . The former is internationally renowned for it’s bold Shiraz, of which there is plenty on offer. The Eden Valley enjoys a cooler climate, higher elevation, and shallow rocky soils, resulting in exquisite Rieslings and vibrant more medium bodied Shiraz . Many wineries in the Barossa will source fruit from individual vineyards in each region depending on the style they are searching for. This ability to quite quickly move between the two areas allows for a unique comparison and understanding of the impact of climate and soil to the winemaking process. You can find out more about the regions in our Barossa Valley and Eden Valley region guides. The Best Barossa Valley and Eden Valley Cellar Doors Chateau Tanunda Established in 1890, the grand buildings and exquisite gardens of Chateau Tanunda are built on the site of the Barossa's earliest vines. Be sure to book for the Discover the Chateau tour, which departs daily at 11:30 am, unwind with a game of croquet on the lawn and enjoy a wine tasting in the grand barrel room. 9 Basedow Rd, Tanunda - view on our Barossa winery map Open Daily 10 am to 5 pm Visit the Chateau Tanunda website Elderton Wines Elderton’s cellar door is quintessential Barossa, with its stunning views, fantastic wines and warm welcome from their friendly staff. There is a stunning array of wines on offer for tasting, from their Nuriootpa, Craneford and Greenock vineyards. 3-5 Tanunda Rd, Nuriootpa - view on our Barossa winery map Open Daily 10 am to 4 pm Mon-Fri 11 am to 4 pm Sat-Sun Visit the Elderton Wines website Pindarie Wines The old farm buildings that make up the Pindarie cellar door were hand restored over a period of 20 years by vigneron and winemaker couple Wendy Allan and Tony Brooks. This determination and eye to detail is present in their exquisite estate grown wines featuring Shiraz, Cabernet Sauvignon and unique range of Mediterranean varietals such as Montepulciano, Sangiovese, Tempranillo, and Sangiovese. 946 Rosedale Rd, Gomersal - view on our Barossa winery map Open Daily 11 am to 4 pm Mon-Fri 11 am to 5 pm Sat-Sun Visit the Pindarie Wines Website Henschke Wines The intimate and charming cottage that serves as the Henschke cellar door showcases the sustained six-generation focus on producing internationally renowned wines that make the Henschke family famous. Drawing on select vineyards from the Eden, Adelaide Hills and Barossa Valley regions, the Henschke cellar door is the perfect place to sample the unique effect of terroir in their premium single-vineyard wines. Selector caught up with Justine Henschke to talk Barossa food and wine in this interview 1428 Keyneton Rd, Keyneton - view on our Barossa winery map Open Mon – Fri 9 am to 4:30 pm Sat 9 am to 12 noon Visit the Henschke website Seppeltsfield Seppeltsfield is perhaps Australia’s most historic winery with a fascinating history forged in the pioneering vision of Joseph and Joanna Seppelt in 1851. This grand complex of heritage buildings is the perfect place to sample their unique 100-year-old fortified wines and to taste wine from the year of your birth. Seppeltsfield is a must for every Australian wine tragic or budding wine historian. 730 Seppeltsfield Rd, Barossa Valley - view on our Barossa winery map Open Daily 10:30 am to 5 pm Visit the Seppeltsfield website Thorn-Clarke This relaxed Barossa cellar door is the perfect place to unwind during your visit to the region. Enjoy the locally sourced regional platter in the winery garden while sampling the fantastic Eden Valley whites or Barossa Valley reds on offer sourced from their four estate-owned vineyards. 226 Gawler Park Rd, Angaston - view on our Barossa winery map Open Daily 9 am to 5 pm Mon-Fri 11 am to 4 pm Sat-Sun Visit the Thorn-Clarke website Two Hands Wines This boutique Barossa Valley winery allows visitors to sample their range of innovative wines in an intimate and informative setting out on the tasting deck with views across Marananga. 273 Neldner Rd, Marananga - view on our Barossa winery map Open Daily 10 am to 5 pm Visit the Two Hands website Yalumba Established in 1849, Yalumba is one of Australia’s most iconic and important wine labels. The impressive wine room, built inside the original brandy store is the perfect place to sample the wide range of wines on offer from everyday table wines through to their exquisite reserve collections. 40 Eden Valley Rd, Angaston - view on our Barossa winery map Open Daily 10 am to 5 pm Visit the Yalumba website Grant Burge Nestled atop of a hill along Krondorf road, the Grant Burge cellar door enjoys exquisite views over the Barossa Valley floor in one direction and rollings lawns and manicured gardens in the other. With a fantastic range of world class Barossa shiraz to sample, spend the afternoon unwinding on the lawn with one of their highly regarded platters. Krondorf Rd, Tanunda - view on our Barossa winery map Open Daily 10 am to 5 pm Visit the Grant Burge website Interactive Barossa Winery Map Planning a trip to the Barossa? Download our interactive Barossa Valley winery map. To save on your browser or device click here For more information on visiting the Barossa be sure to visit the official Barossa website or stop by the Visitors Center in Tanunda when you're in the area. But, if you’d like to sample some of the wineries listed in this guide before you visit – explore our wide selection of Barossa wines and find out more about the wineries listed in this guide in our Meet the Makers section. With our Wine Selectors Regional Releases , you'll experience a different wine region each release with all wines expertly selected by our Tasting Panel , plus you’ll receive comprehensive tasting notes and fascinating insights into each region. Visit our Regional Releases page to find out more!
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Australia's Wine Identity
Words by Campbell Mattinson on 17 Sep 2018
Heaven help Australia. All that fretting over the growing and making of our wine; all those trips by all those winemakers to all parts of the world to learn various tricks; all those decades of winemaking experimentation, invention and development; all that and then the gatekeepers – holding baseball bats, you’d reckon – tell us that Australian wine doesn’t have a strong identity, and it needs to develop one. Pronto. To illustrate the problem, I was sitting at a table in Italy’s Valpolicella wine region recently with a collection of international wine folk when someone asked where Australian wine is at. “It’s in the healthiest state imaginable,” I said, proudly.  “The offering is astonishingly diverse now,” I continued. “Low fi, hi fi, old school, new school, classic varieties, obscure varieties, everything. Twenty years ago there was a planting boom; 10 years ago there was a lot of good wine being made; combine those two and you have lots of mature vines across all sorts of varieties and the quality has moved from good to very good, if not higher.” Self-praise is no praise, but I thought I’d done pretty well at encapsulating Australian wine. The response, though, to my surprise, had the brightness of three-day-old sunburn. “Australia’s problem,” someone cut in, or cut down, “is there’s no clear message. It’s like a tasting plate where everything’s good, but you can’t remember any of it afterwards.” Baseball, bat, time. The view to down under The wine world, it turns out, hasn’t been sitting around waiting for us to out-do it. No matter how good our wine is, the wine world is a brutal place, determined to protect or extend its patch – not to mention its pre-conceived world view.  Two things are important to note here: a) the fight for international market space is not just about the wine in the bottle. It’s about the message, how it’s told, and who’s telling it. Wine is both the most symbolic drink in the world and the most emotional. Out in the big bad world, therefore, a clear wine identity matters enormously. b) The wider wine world could burn in hell, for all we’d care, if Australian wine production was based around domestic consumption only. But that boat sailed a long time ago. Australia produces far more wine than it could ever domestically consume; what the world thinks of our wine matters, and matters a lot.
A usual suspect The irony, of course, is that for a time Australia did, internationally at least, have a clear identity and message. Australian wine was either sunny and cheap or big and melodramatic. These messages were brilliantly clear and effective. But the majority of Australia’s wine community has spent the past decade either trying desperately to expand on these messages, or trying to tear them to shreds. Why? Because they sell Australian wine too far short. “You can’t generalise about Australian wine for over a million reasons,” Sarah Crowe of Yarra Yering says. Virginia Willcock of Vasse Felix is of the same view. “Wine is so complex and so is Australia. We need to break it down.” This is the thing – simple messages don’t really fit Australian wine anymore. They don’t because, to state the bleeding obvious, Australia is so large, and therefore geographically diverse. Our wine, when it’s good, reflects that. It’s not the tyranny of distance, it’s the tyranny of size. To make matters worse, perceptions of Australian wine in world markets can go to infinity and beyond. “Each export market,” Sarah Crowe says, “would have a different response (if asked of Australia’s wine identity). Having just been in the USA, it’s frightening to read (wine writer) Joe Czerwinski’s Facebook feed when he was asked what would make people buy Australian wine. “The comments are stuck in the 2000s for the most part. Export market perception is largely mono-dimensional South Australia or South Eastern Australia, which maybe they think is one and the same thing. It’s nowhere near a representation of what’s happening across this vast country.” Jeff Burch of Burch Family Wines agrees, and then widens the lens.  “It depends where in the world,” he says. “Asia – particularly China – has a very high acknowledgement of Australian wine, right up there with the top French. Much better recognition than Spain, Italy, Chile. USA though – poor recognition, not on the radar, a lot of work to do for quality Australia wine.  “UK/Europe, very Euro-centric for the top end, they’re only interested in value wine from Australia. Hard to see a future for quality Australian wine there.” Sue Hodder, senior winemaker of Wynns Coonawarra Estate, is more up beat, though cautiously so.  “Perceptions of, and knowledge about, Australian wine has pleasingly shifted upwards in the last two years. Younger, better wine-educated, and more widely-travelled trade professionals have helped. In the first instance though, we’ll be happy if international consumers just know that Australian wine is a diverse offering.”
A dirty word Diverse. This has become the most commonly used word to describe Australian wine. It’s the word we’re hoping will become our identity, because it’s the most accurate. The problem is that a lengthy explanation is usually required as a follow up; diversity can be a hard sell. It’s not snappy and all-encompassing in the way, say, of the gold-standard identities of French Champagne, Barossa Shiraz or, indeed, mere mention of Burgundy. And wine identity is like humour; if you have to explain it, there’s a problem.  There’s an argument that use of the words ‘Australian wine’ has us trying to achieve ‘cut through’ with the broad side of the blade. Virginia Willcock is certainly of this view.  “The broad term ‘Australian wine’ drives me insane,’ Virginia says.  “While we have common varieties across the country, the diversity of regions is significant and shouldn’t be thrown into a generalised country.”  New world countries like Australia Argentina Chile, New Zealand and strive for a clear national wine identity. Old world countries more commonly lead with their regions; the country is a given. “Our winemaking styles have changed over the past 15 years,” says Alexia Roberts winemaker at Penny’s Hill.  “I remember when I first started out in McLaren Vale in 2004, whites were all made from Chardonnay, Semillon and Sauvignon Blanc. It would be difficult to find a regional McLaren Vale white made from any of these varieties nowadays. “International markets have welcomed these changes, (but) we are still struggling with the Australian image and key message. Our message is so diverse that I do think this could be diluting the key facts. The heroes are our regions.”  Virginia agrees.  “My theory about ‘Australian wine’ is that the best way to break it down is by region and regional strengths to give clarity for quality and diversity,” she says.  “Then, if someone loves a strong regional wine, they might try other varieties from that region.” No probs, really Of course, this is a nice problem to have. Australia’s wine identity or message basically is: we have so much to offer now, we don’t know where to start.  “What I produce is different from what my neighbours produce,” is Sarah’s way of putting it. “The diversity is why people want to discover more and engage with new wines and discover new producers. For better or for worse, it is a complex topic and should be spoken about as such.” There’s strength and comfort in numbers, but the time is fast approaching, if it hasn’t already past, where the notion of an Australian wine identity is shown the door and real one-on-one engagement, region by region, takes hold. After all, no one falls in love with a race; they fall in love with one clear object of their desires.
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Riverina: Farming, Food And Wine
Words by Nathalie Craig on 16 Mar 2018
The Riverina region has undergone a renaissance that’s seeing its established traditions given a fresh makeover. The result is a dynamic food and wine experience presenting local produce with European flair. The Riverina  has long been referred to as Australia’s food bowl. This south western region of New South Wales between Griffith and Wagga Wagga is abundant with citrus and stonefruit, grapes, figs, olives, nuts, lamb, beef, chicken, wheat and rice. What is not so widely known is that there is a shift happening in this rural farming centre. It’s being led by a growing number of innovative chefs, winemakers and growers dedicated to providing new and unique wine, food and agritourism experiences. Dining Out
The wealth of fresh produce available in the Riverina , combined with a strong history of Italian immigration following the World Wars, means there is no shortage of quality places to dine. Chef Luke Piccolo, who owns and runs Griffith’s renowned Limone Dining , cut his teeth at Sydney restaurants Pilu at Freshwater and Pendolino before returning home to Griffith to open his own fine-dining establishment. Luke, who is of Italian heritage, won the Council of Italian Restaurants Australia (CIRA) Young Talent Award in 2013. His nonna, who cooks beautiful rustic Italian food, was the first to show him the ropes in the kitchen. “When he left school, Luke came to help at our family restaurant and we were blown off the planet with what he could do,” his father, Peter reveals. “We were blind to what had been going on for the past decade. Then all of a sudden there he was in the kitchen at 16 years of age with amazing cooking skills, work ethic and creations.” Luke’s nonna taught him about the no waste policy, which you can now see woven into Limone Dining. The place is built almost completely from recycled materials and Luke offers an evolving seasonal menu featuring local produce. Think fresh tagliolini with spring lamb ragu followed by char-grilled quail with pancetta finished off with blood orange almond sponge and lemon custard. For full-blown Italian dining in Griffith, visit Zecca Handmade Italian in the old bank building. Run by returning locals, Ben, Michaela and Daniel, Zecca’s regularly changing chalkboard menu is packed with delicious Italian staples. Their Maltagliati, casarecce and pappardelle pastas are lovingly made by hand each day. Plates of house-made antipasti are packed with olives, salumi and baccala from local Murray cod. Another restaurant not to pass by is Pages on Pine in the main street of Leeton. It is a stalwart of the area, run by French-born chef Eric Pages and his wife Vanessa. They serve up French fare with a creative twist and are huge supporters of local producers, including Coolamon Cheese, Bruceron pork, Riverina  lamb and Randall Organics. They also offer a three-course set menu, matched with Leeton wines from Lillypilly and Toorak. Coolamon Cheese
A nirvana for cheese-lovers has been formed inside an historic 1920s co-op building in the main street of Coolamon. Cheesemaker Barry Lillywhite and his son Anton Green have filled the space with top-of-the-line cheese making facilities, a commercial kitchen, deli and generously sized dining area. All their cheeses are handcrafted on site using just four simple ingredients: local Riverina milk, starter culture, rennet and salt. “By hand-making our cheeses in small batches we can tend to them more closely, watch them mature cheese by cheese and release them to our customers at exactly the right time,” Barry explains. Barry’s signature collection of native Australian-flavoured cheeses pack a punch. Right now he has lemon myrtle, river mint, bush tomato and alpine pepper cheeses on the menu. Other cheeses available include vintage cheddars and oil-infused fettas, blues and runny Bries and Camemberts. His soft cheeses are a far cry from varieties you find in the supermarket. “Our soft cheeses are not stabilised and this is why they are soft and gooey and have a mind of their own,” he explains. “In fact, the only preservative we use in any of our cheeses is salt.” Visitors to Coolamon Cheese can taste test the cheeses or sit down to a cheese-inspired meal from the cafe menu. Here the cheeses are served with a range of gourmet accompaniments like tempura saltbush, cold roast lamb, pickles, onion jam, sticky prunes and balsamic strawberries. Guests are also invited to take a tour of the factory led by one of their cheese makers. “We want visitors to understand where their food comes from and the processes it goes through to get to their plates,” Barry says. Wine a plenty
The Riverina  is home to 20,000 hectares of vines, making it the largest wine producing region in NSW and the second largest in Australia behind Riverland in South Australia. The region is well established, having been pioneered in 1913 by the famous McWilliam family of the Hunter Valley. Riverina wineries are largely family owned with many having Italian heritage including Calabria Family Wines, Mino & Co, Lillypilly Wines and De Bortoli . Some of the families behind these labels actually began making wine out of necessity when they first migrated to Australia, so they could enjoy a glass with their meal as they would have back home in Italy. “At the end of the long working day, my grandfather found he looked forward to a glass of home-made wine,” Elizabeth Calabria of Calabria Family Wines explains. “Unfortunately, he didn’t have the money to invest in all of the necessary equipment to make it, so he took over my grandmother’s laundry tubs and improvised,” she continues. “Soon enough, he was producing wines for the local Europeans who had also made Griffith their home.” Ideal conditions
The Murrumbidgee Irrigation scheme, coupled with rich red soils and a warm Mediterranean climate, allows most varieties of grapes to grow well. Although the area was once looked upon as a producer of table wines, successful Italian varieties are fast becoming the star. “What is exciting is what we are learning about alternative varieties, such as Montepulciano, Nero d’Avola, Aglianico, Vermentino and Pinot Bianco,” chief winemaker at Calabria Family Wines, Emma Norbiato says. “By controlling the yield and the canopy, we are seeing some beautiful fruit and making some exciting wines. “In the next five years, I would like to think we will see more thoughtful viticulture and winemaking in our alternative varieties. Montepulciano , Nero d’Avola , Pinot Bianco are new to our region and haven’t even reached their potential yet.” Vermentino has also been a successful addition to Lillypilly Wines. Their first vintage of the dry Italian white was released in 2015 and went straight on to win the trophy for Best Dry White Varietal at the Perth Royal Wine Show and another gold at the Small Vigneron Awards in Canberra. General manager of Mino & Co, Nick Guglielmino says while Italian wines are not new to Griffith, there is now a higher demand for them. “We are experiencing a time where these varieties are being more accepted by consumers,” he says. “Griffith indeed has a rich history of Italian culture, so it makes sense for us to follow the style of wines we are familiar with, that of Italian authenticity yet grown in Australian conditions similar to that of their origins.”
Two Blues Sauvignon Blanc 2014
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