Hand-selected wines from 500+
Australian wineries delivered to your door!
Hand-selected wines from 500+
Australian wineries delivered to your door!

Alert

The maximum quantity permitted for this item is , if you wish to purchase more please call 1300 303 307
Wine

Vintage 2017 update

Hunter Valley, NSW

Tyrrell's Wines - Bruce Tyrrell, Managing Director

The outlook is great for our winemaking friends in the Hunter Valley, including Tyrrell's Wines whose Managing Director, Bruce Tyrrell wrote in his report when their Hunter vintage finished in February:

"As I write this our Hunter Vintage is over apart from 3 tonnes of Cabernet, which has got at least a week to go and hopefully it survives the rain this weekend. We finished picking this morning with Pokolbin Hills Shiraz, the end of Stevens Glen Oak and DeBeyers Sangiovese."

"It is only 35 days since we started picking Chardonnay for sparkling, and I think we will all remember this Vintage for the joy of picking clean fruit, and no mud. At the end of the day we have some very good wine in the cellar, our tonnages are about spot on budget, and we have a month to wait until we start in Heathcote."

You can read Bruce's full vintage experience here .

Yarra Valley, VIC

Rob Dolan Wines - Rob Dolan, Managing Director/Winemaker

It's a 9/10 at the half way mark of Vintage 2017 and it looks like the Yarra Valley has been fortunate on the weather front. After a cool early summer and a nervous January/Feb an amazing early Autumn spread through the Yarra. It looks like a vintage from the "naughty nineties" - cool/mild with evenly balanced crops, excellent acidity, ripe flavours and tannin structure.

Pinot Noir will be a standout with crops on most vineyards down 20% however some vineyards will achieve their expected average. Chardonnay/Pinot Gris have bountiful flavour and fresh, crisp acidity and balance. Picking of Shiraz/Cab Sauv and other red varietals is now underway after a few days of thundery weather and light rain.

A Yarra vintage to put in the "black book" as there will be some beautiful wines across all vineyards and wine companies.

McLaren Vale, SA

d'Arenberg Wines - Chester Osborn, Chief Winemaker

It's been a very late vintage compared to recent years. The last part of summer and the start of autumn were very dry. What normally is cool climate here in the McLaren Vale, leading to fragrant floral wines, has been aided by the very dry weather. The deep geology and water availability in the roots leads to greater concentration of fruit.

Whites are looking outstanding, the best for years and the reds - where do I start? Shiraz is looking beautiful, very aromatic and spicy, with strong fragrant length. Many are elegant, but strongly persistent. Bolder. Great fragrant fruit length. Cabernets and Grenache also looking outstanding, but it's still early days for those varieties. All reds have great potential this year.

Margaret River, WA

Flying Fish Cove - Brett House, CEO

Vintage 2017 has been a more traditional year than the past few, with whites throughout the region being harvested later in February and well into March, yields have been strong on most white varieties, after being lower than normal over the past few years. Whilst it is still too early to predict the quality of the year, all signs appear to suggest another strong one.

The reds are still some time off, again signifying a more traditional harvest. There has been a small amount of rain during March, which also slows down the ripening process, all grower reports have been positive to date.

Redgate Winery - Joel Page, Head Winemaker

It's been a relatively mild summer with good yields on all varieties. The fruit flavours have developed early considering the baumes, but late considering the date. All the whites have shown higher levels of malic acid considering the cooler year. The whites are brightly aromatic and look great.

On to the reds; we are expecting some lower baumes, but well developed flavour and tannin structure. Hopefully, some soft, elegant styles.

Geographe, WA

Willow Bridge Estate - Kim Horton, Senior Winemaker

A much cooler and wetter spring of 2016, and cooler conditions in 2017 have led to a delayed vintage in the Geographe region, almost 3 weeks later than historically. The result is a superb batch of white wines, with excellent flavour at lower sugar levels, however, some caution was required to ensure acid levels were palatable. Yields generally are higher than last season. Chardonnay looks outstanding.

A small amount of red has been harvested in the region, however, likely to be in full swing at the beginning of April.

#girlpower on the tractors! #vintage2017 is underway! 🍾#fergusonvalley #geographewineregion

A post shared by @willowbridgeestate on

Great Southern, WA

Plantagenet Wines - Luke Eckersley, Senior Winemaker

The vintage thus far for Plantagenet and the Great Southern is what the locals are calling 'normal' - late in comparison to recent times, but normal if gauged over the last few decades! Along with that, we have had milder conditions bringing about longer, slower ripening, so the whites thus far are very fine with good acid length and elegance! We have received a few parcels of Pinot Noir that are showing intense colour (so could be a good one for Pinot) and the Cabernets are ahead on seed development, making it neck and neck with Shiraz and Cabernet as to who will cross the line first!

You might also like

Wine
Embracing isolation with Frankland Estate’s Hunter Smith
To celebrate the Frankland Estate Riesling 2015 being our October Wine of the Month, we caught up with winemaker Hunter Smith to talk isolation, organics and a special Guinea fowl. What was it like growing up in Frankland River – WA’s most isolated wine region? Looking back, amazing! The concept of isolation was not there, we had total freedom after school (a thriving 60-student primary school) to go horse riding, rabbit trapping and yabbie catching, help out on the farm, kayak down the Frankland River, camp, fish and explore on the spectacular south coast and have big farm picnics where friends would join us at the farm and the folks would drink magnums of red well into the evening around a big fire.   Your parents weren’t always in the grape-growing game – how did that come about? Farming and the land are a big part of both my father’s and mother’s family histories in Australia. My father Barrie grew up on a vineyard in South Australia’s Riverland and his family moved to a farm in the Frankland River region back in the 50s, so I guess it was always in his blood. Fast forward a little and Judi and Barrie met in Perth and purchased a farm in Frankland River down the road a bit from my grandparents and started farming sheep and wheat. Dad was always making a barrel of wine a year and in the early 1980s, Judi and he went on a trip through France with Bill Hardy and let’s just say they got the bug to plant some vines. The first vines were planted in 1988 and, over time, sheep numbers have gone from 15,000 to pretty much just a handful now as the wine business has become our main focus. Did you always imagine you’d end up working in the wine industry? Standing in 5ºC pruning vines in the middle of a Frankland River winter would make any teenager look for greener pastures. I was adamant I would do anything but winemaking and grape growing. I spent 10 years after school in university and travelling and this made me realise how much I loved the industry and the region in which we farm our vines. A vintage with Eric and Bertold Salomon in Kremstal, Austria was probably the point in time when it all changed for me. Given how pristine the Frankland River region is, and the fact that it’s virtually pollution free, is there a commitment among local growers to organic viticulture? I think generally, viticulturists are looking to be as sustainable as possible and this region is very much that way inclined, we have a very complementary climate to help with this. While we remain the only certified organic vineyard and winery in the Frankland River region, there is a big move in this direction.
One of the more unique members of your team is Gladys – what contribution does she make to the vineyard? As a family, we don’t believe in hierarchy in the workplace, but Gladys is the matriarch of our amazing Guinea fowl flock. Every year, Barrie incubates eggs found by the vineyard workers and a breeding program sees a few hundred new birds added to the team. Under Gladys command, they help control pests such as weevils. It’s all the one percenters that help make a successful organic farming system. What difference do you think your organic approach made to the 2015 Riesling? I could bang on about organics for hours, but what I will say is, we have seen vine health improve remarkably through the attention to detail in every aspect of nutrition, soil biology and climatic conditions. As a result, we are seeing very exciting developments to fruit balance and we are finding natural acidity is retained nicely. We have also been able to increase ripening a fraction, giving this wine delicious generosity of flavour, while maintaining that delicate and a nervous framework of acidity that make Frankland Estate Rieslings a stand out. In our 2017 calendar, your Riesling is matched with steamed snapper with Asian flavours – what’s your favourite meal to enjoy with it? That sounds pretty good! Being just an hour’s drive to the Southern Ocean, I love sitting on the beach catching fresh whiting and the humble herring, these cooked over an open fire with a Riesling (with a couple of years’ age) is spectacular.   What’s your favourite wine memory? Gosh, too many great wine moments to pin it down to one, but a very memorable night was 10 years ago when our great late friend and wine importer to the USA John Larchet, with his great friend Ray Harris and a group of fellow Australian winemakers, spent an unbelievable evening enjoying some of Ray’s finest bottles in his New York apartment overlooking the NYC skyline. I remember thinking I would never see some of these wines again and I couldn’t help but think how amazing it was to be sitting on the other side of the world in a city so far removed from our Isolation Ridge vineyard in Frankland River, a special memory! What’s your favourite… Way to spend time off? With the family on the farm or at the beach. Holiday destination? Bremer Bay (south coast WA) whales, fishing, spectacular white beaches and probably even more remote than Frankland River! It’s a must see for anyone that’s never been. Wine and food match? I don’t get too caught up with that, if there’s food and wine, I’ll be there! Sporting team? Wallabies (sometimes!) Book? Something with a bit of Australian history – I always enjoy reading, nothing too dry!  I’m reading Peter FitzSimons’ Eureka right now, which is a good read.
Wine
Screw Cap vs Cork - the Seal of Approval
Words by Dave Mavor on 5 Jun 2017
Tasting Panellist Dave Mavor tells why a crack wins over a pop when it comes to opening wine. Screwcap closures were first used in the Australian wine industry in the 1970s, but consumers at the time perceived these wines to be of lower quality, and the initiative soon fizzled out. The screwcap comeback came in the 2000 vintage when a number of  ClareValley  winemakers bottled some of their  Rieslings  under screwcap to prevent cork-related faults. The most common of these is cork 'taint', caused by a compound known as TCA, which was often present in cork bark. Before the proliferation of screw cap closures in Australia, the level of wines ruined by cork taint was 12-15%. To put this in perspective, for every two dozen you purchased, it was accepted that there would be at least two bottles affected. This relatively high occurrence of cork taint was due largely to cork suppliers providing Australia with (compared to Europe) second rate corks with a higher incidence of taint producing bacteria. Due to the airtight nature of screwcaps, the problem of premature oxidation was also eliminated, along with the 'flavourscalping' tendency of the porous cork material, and other potential flavour modifications. Another advantage now widely recognised by consumers is the convenience factor - screwcapped bottles are easy to open and re-seal!   SCREWING WITH TIME One of the criticisms of screwcaps, apart from the ridiculous (in my view) notion of missing the 'romance' of the sound of popping a cork, was that the seal was so good that wines would not mature with time, due to the absence of oxygen. However, there is normally a miniscule amount of dissolved oxygen within the wine itself when it is bottled, which will allow the wine to evolve, and each bottle will age at roughly the same rate, while retaining its freshness and vitality for much longer. With wines under cork, the maturation process is not only much faster, but each bottle will age at a different rate due to the variable consistency and therefore oxygen permeability of the corks. A recent innovation in screwcap technology has seen the development of closures that allow strictly controlled rates of oxygen transmission, giving winemakers the choice of differing maturation rates for different wine styles. I have now had the opportunity to taste wines that have been aging gracefully under screwcap for up to 15 years, including the same wine bottled under both cork and screwcap. I've even had the privilege of tasting wines from those early adopters in the 70's, which at the time were still going strong.   INTERNATIONAL EYE-OPENER To reinforce my beliefs, award-winning Australian wine writer Tyson Stelzer came up with some stunning results from a tasting at Italy's biggest wine show, Vinitaly, in March, 2015. Tyson presented five mature flagship Australian red wines under both cork and screwcap in a blind tasting. Some of Australia's most age-worthy and respected reds were presented, including the  Henschke  Hill of Grace Shiraz 2004. In a major surprise the panel of international wine professionals voted the screwcapped wines ahead of the corks. "The result was ground-breaking for Italy, where screwcaps remain controversial and until recently have been prohibited on the country's top wines," Tyson said. Even Venice sommelier Annie Martin-Stefannato admitted "we will have to change our mindset". So, given all the evidence for the superiority of screwcap closures, my personal preference will always be to hear a 'crack' rather than a 'pop' when I open a bottle of wine.      
Wine
The Best McLaren Vale Wineries and Cellar Doors
Exceptional wine blends, new varieties, and ocean views abound as we present the best McLaren Vale wineries and cellar doors with this guide and interactive map McLaren Vale is a dream to visit, with exceptional wines, regional produce and beautiful scenery nestled between the Mount Lofty Ranges and the beaches of Gulf St Vincent. The region is the gateway to the stunning Fleurieu Peninsula, which looks remarkably like much of the coastline around Lisbon in Portugal. It’s this warm, Mediterranean-style climate and proximity to the sea that explains the fantastic range of Italian, Spanish and Portuguese varieties on offer throughout the region. Expect to see  Tempranillo ,  Sangiovese , Touriga Nacional, Vermentino, Zinfandel, Fiano, Touriga and countless other  alternative varieties   on offer. There is clearly no fear of experimentation in McLaren Vale, which is evident in their superior  Red Wine blends  and a real sense of passion and something new evident at every winery and cellar door. You can find out more about the wines on offer in our  McLaren Vale region guide . Wine Selectors’ Tasting Panellist and Wine Show Judge , Trent Mannell is a big fan of McLaren Vale: "It's a region where the vines meet the sea, so it has a unique coastal vibe and the wines reflect the influence of the maritime climate. The cellar doors are so peaceful; it’s the most tranquil wine region I know.” The Best McLaren Vale Wineries Hugh Hamilton Wines
The Hugh Hamilton Wines cellar door is not to be missed during your next McLaren Vale visit. The unique setting, perched above the vines with near 270 degree views is remarkable, as is the passion for wine on show by the cellar door staff. There is a great range of wines available for tasting from their classic Shiraz through to the eclectic blends and new alternative varieties for which McLaren Vale is so famous. We recommend booking for one of the great hosted wine and cheese flights of their single vineyard wines. 94 McMurtrie Rd, McLaren Vale –  view on our McLaren Vale winery map Open Daily 11 am to 5 pm Visit the Hugh Hamilton website Battle of Bosworth
This charming boutique cellar door is a must visit in the region, particularly so if you are curious about learning about  organic wines . Winemaker Joch Bosworth took the reins for the family business in 1995 and began the conversion to organic practices. There is a real pride in doing things the old-fashioned way, which comes through in the fantastic examples of Touriga Nacional, Shiraz, Chardonnay and Cabernet Sauvignon. The cellar door is located just outside historic Willunga, in their restored 1850s stables, with views over the vineyards and west to St Vincent. 92 Gaffney Rd, Willunga –  view on our McLaren Vale winery map Open Daily 11 am to 5 pm Visit the Battle of Bosworth website D’Arenberg
d’Arenberg is an institution in McLaren Vale, with d’Arry Osborn and his chief winemaker son, Chester renowned for their fantastic Shiraz and Grenache. For now, the d’Arenberg cellar door is housed in their beautifully restored 19th-century homestead. In this charming setting, you can enjoy an extensive range of great wines, guided by their always entertaining cellar door staff. But not for long, soon the daring and ambitious ‘d’Arenberg Cube' will be complete. At the moment, it is more of a sight to behold, than the multi-venue cellar door it will become. But, if you’d like to keep an eye on its progress, you can watch one of their regular  construction time-lapses . Find out more about The Cube and d’Arenberg in our interview with  Chester here . Osborn Rd, McLaren Vale –  view on our McLaren Vale winery map Open Daily 10 am to 5 pm Visit the d’Arenberg website Gemtree Wines
Husband and wife , Mike and Melissa run  Gemtree Wines   with a simple philosophy – minimal intervention in the winemaking process and a more environmentally conscious farming system to produce wines which are powerful, concentrated, and expressive of the true characteristics of each grape variety and the region. This relaxed and simple outlook translates through to the cellar door experience on their outdoor verandah with views all the way to the sea. Here you learn more about  organic  and biodynamic farming practices while sampling their fantastic wines, or get adventurous and explore the 10 hectare wetland eco-trail. 167 Elliott Rd, McLaren Flat –  view on our McLaren Vale winery map Open Daily 10 am to 5 pm Visit the Gemtree website Leconfield Wines
Nestled amongst the vineyards with magnificent views to the Willunga escarpment, the  Leconfield  cellar door is the perfect place to sample Richard Hamilton’s Estate, Single Vineyard Reserve, and select Leconfield wines. With family owned vineyards in McLaren Vale, as well as the lovely vines surrounding their McLaren Vale cellar door, you are able to sample and appreciate the difference that the natural environment has on the wines. You can find out more about Chief Winemaker,  Paul Gordon’s process in our recent Q&A . With platters of local regional food on offer and sweeping lawns and verandahs, the Leconfield cellar door is a delightful stop during any visit to the area. 439 Main Rd, McLaren Vale –  view on our McLaren Vale winery map Open Daily 10 am to 5 pm Visit the Leconfield website Mr Riggs at the General Wine Bar
Part restaurant, part cellar door, this McLaren Vale institution is a collaboration with Zonte’s Footstep, another noted McLaren Vale winery. It is the perfect place to stop for lunch or Friday night dinner. There are fantastic wine flights on offer in which spectacular Mediterranean varieties, Shiraz, and whites are matched with morsels of contrasting and complementary dishes from Chef Ben Sommariva. Winemaker Ben Riggs is able to use his extensive contacts with growers to cherry pick fruit from McLaren Vale, Adelaide Hills, and other premium South Australian sites. This, combined with Ben's considerable European experience, is evident in every wine available for tasting. 55a Main Rd, McLaren Flat –  view on our McLaren Vale winery map Open Daily Sat-Thur 10 am to 5 pm, Fri 10 am to late Visit the Mr. Riggs website Oliver's Taranga
This fantastic McLaren Vale cellar door is contained within a charming original 1850s stone workers cottage, built by the first generation of the Oliver family. There is a great range of exceptional Shiraz and Cabernet Sauvignon, as well as small batch Fiano, Grenache, Mencia, and Sagrantino. Before you visit McLaren Vale, be sure to check their  events page , as they host many novel wine and food events such as their monthly Porchetta Parties and Twilight Pizza events through to pop-up events in Adelaide. 246 Seaview Rd, McLaren Vale –  view on our McLaren Vale winery map Open Daily 10 am to 4 pm Visit the Oliver’s Taranga website Coriole
Coriole is situated in the undulating hills of McLaren Vale, within sight of the sea. The small and boutique cellar door is found in the old ironstone barn built in 1860 and is surrounded by the Estate vineyards.  Coriole is famous for pioneering alternative varieties in the region, namely Sangiovese in 1985 and the release of Australia's first Fiano in 2005. Their diverse range includes Sangiovese, Barbera,, Fiano, Picpoul, Nero d’Avola through to exquisite examples of the classic varieties, Shiraz and Cab Sav. Chaffeys Rd, McLaren Vale -  view on our McLaren Vale winery map Mon – Fri 10 am to 5 pm, Sat – Sun 11 am to 5 pm Visit the Coriole website Penny's Hill
Set on the historic Ingleburn property and its stunning grounds, this charming winery is the perfect place to stop for lunch during your travels through McLaren Vale. Indulge in the Kitchen Door Restaurant before wandering through the Red Dot Gallery or visiting the farmyard animals. Winemaker Alexia Roberts has picked up a swag of wine show wins recently, including the World’s Best Cabernet at the Concours International des Cabernets in France, as well as Best Australian Red in Show at Mundus Vini Germany for the past two years running. This talent is very obvious in the premium wines available for tasting. 281 Main Rd, McLaren Vale –  view on our McLaren Vale winery map Open Daily 10 am to 5 pm Visit the Penny’s Hill website Serafino
Steve (Serafino) Maglieri arrived in Adelaide in 1964 as a teenager from Italy with little more than a passionate dream to make great wine. After many highs and a few lows in the wine industry, eventually the Serafino label emerged and the Maglieri family was able to craft their own piece of paradise amongst the gumtrees of their McLaren Vale winery. The warm, friendly and familiar ethos of Serafino is evident in the cellar door, charming restaurant, and four-star accommodation. As such, it is the perfect place to base yourself during a weekend getaway. There is a great range of Italian and alternative varieties such as the Bellissimo series of Vermentino, Fiano and Montepulciano through to reserve Grenache and Shiraz. Kangarilla Rd, McLaren Vale –  view on our McLaren Vale winery map Open Daily 10 am to 4:30 pm Visit the Serafino website Mclaren Vale Winery Map  Planning a trip to McLaren Vale? Download our  interactive McLaren Vale winery map.  To save on your browser or device,  click here For more information on visiting McLaren Vale, be sure to visit the official  McLaren Vale region website  or stop by the McLaren Vale & Fleurieu Visitor Information Centre in the centre of town. But, if you’d like to sample some of the wineries listed in this guide before you visit, explore our wide selection of McLaren Vale wines and find out more about the wineries listed here in our  Meet the Makers section . With the Wine Selectors Regional Release program, you'll experience a different wine region each release with all wines expertly selected by our Tasting Panel, plus you’ll receive comprehensive tasting notes and fascinating insights into each region. Visit our  Regular Deliveries  page to find out more! 
Two Blues Sauvignon Blanc 2014
1 case has been added to your cart.
Cart total: xxx
1 case, 12 bottles, 3 accessories