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Wine

We had a wow of a time on Wine Island

The sun was out, the wine was flowing and the party vibe was contagious at this year’s Wine Island as we took over the teepee to host an exciting programme of fun and flavour-filled masterclasses.

Now in its second year, the four-day event was held in November on Sydney Harbour’s Clark Island. With two sessions each day, 35 wineries to choose from and wine masterclasses by us, it was a wine experience like no other.

Tasting Panelists Adam Walls and Nicole Gow, along with our Field Sales Manager David Kelly, had a fantastic time hosting our masterclasses with the Bubbles Off, New-wave Wines, Silent Disco Drops, Dessert Island and Cheese and Wine Matching sessions in the central teepee all a sell-out.

After such a successful event we’ll definitely be back next year as event partners, so if you didn’t get to Wine Island this year, we suggest you mark it on your calendar as a 2017 must-do. See you there!

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Life
Sharp Thinking
Queensland mechanical engineer Mark Henry had the professional chef in mind when, as a student,   he set about developing a range of knives that were supremely functional and of such quality that they could withstand the rigours of Australia's busiest restaurants. They became so popular with chefs, they are now sought by home cooks as well. “I developed the knives for working pro chefs,” recalls Mark. “As a young student with no commercial experience, I had no idea about retail. I just wanted to redefine the working chef’s knife and eliminate all those traditional old weaknesses. “Chefs really liked the Füri knives from the beginning, then they talked about them, wrote about them in their food columns, at their cooking schools. Soon, the department stores were getting so many enquiries from consumers that they wanted Füri too. The demand was such that Füri was an immediate success, and quickly became Australia’s #1 premium knife brand.” The best metal for the best blade Most professional knives are produced in Europe, but Mark wanted to design a knife range that totally re-shaped the category. His first idea was to use high carbon Japanese stainless steel, noted for its superior durability and ease of sharpening.   For the best combination of sharpness and toughness, Mark specified the blade be between the thick, strong European style and the sharp, light Japanese style. “I was determined to use a type of high carbon stainless steel alloy that was more like the old carbon steel knives than the modern European knives,” says Mark. “Without the complex metallurgy, that means Füri knives have the ideal combination for working chefs of a blade material that holds its edge a long time, but is also easier to sharpen than the more common CrMoV alloys used in German knives, and most Japanese knives today. I would love to use full carbon steel, like the famous old French chef knives that take such a sharp edge so easily, but the corrosion would drive everyone mad these days, so it had to be also stain-resistant! Not an easy combination of features, but we achieved it.” Seamless design The next crucial element was in the seamless construction. The blade and the handle are one, so there is no place for food to get trapped, and no rivets or plastic parts to fail. So not only does it look stylish, it is the ultimate in food hygiene and durability. “I thought it was a bit silly that after 800 years of chef knife making, in the ‘90s we still had the same riveted handles, sometimes still with the same type of wood ‘scales’, or plastic more recently,” says Mark. “My chef friends and I all had knives with handles that had split wood, lots of gunk in the gaps, rivets missing, melted plastic, etc. I worked on a way to make the blade and handle into one seamless piece, while still keeping a hollow cavity in the handle for the correct balance. “Nothing beats this construction for hygiene and durability, particularly when combined with our tough steel and strong blades. The Iconic handle What also raises Füri above its competitors is its innovative handle design. The iconic reverse wedge shape means the handle locks into the hand for a safer grip, which helps reduce hand fatigue, and reduces repetitive strain injuries. “While I was still at university (QUT) studying my mech engineering degree, I put some research into the forces involved during the most repetitive and heavy cutting motions chefs use,” explains Mark. “It became quickly evident, to me, that the traditional handle shape (basically the same for 800 years) was opposite to what it should be. The traditional taper which becomes narrower toward the handle actually encourages hand slip toward the blade. Then I realized why nobody cut themselves, even with wet/oily hands: the brain automatically compensates for any small slip by making the hand squeeze tighter on the handle to produce more friction and grip. “That means fatigue for chefs  in the short term, and arthritis, carpal tunnel and other problems in the long term The Füri reverse-wedge handle actively reduces this slip by becoming thicker toward the blade, in the direction that counts, so that less hand squeeze is required for the same cutting work. This means less fatigue and less hand problems for chefs, or anyone with sore hands.” Füri’s innovative design elements and materials result in knives of the utmost quality and are the reasons Füri is the knife of choice for chefs around the world. TV chef and restaurateur Kylie Kwong is a Füri brand ambassador, while Nigella Lawson is also a big fan. Füri knives are ranged in all major department stores and independents around the country. For more information visit furiglobal.com
Wine
Henschke – Beyond the Hill
Words by Paul Diamond on 27 Sep 2017
Selector goes beyond the hill (of Grace) to discover a treasure  trove of stories in the vast and impressive range of a true icon in the Australian wine industry. The Henschke name holds a revered place in the vast mural that is the Australian wine landscape and for very good reason. Their Hill of Grace Shiraz has defined what is possible for an Australian single vineyard wine and is often considered our greatest. At $825 a bottle, Hill of Grace is now considered a wine ‘unicorn’ and the current 2012 vintage recently received Halliday’s prestigious Wine Of The Year award , further cementing its place as one of the world’s greats. The vineyard, planted by second generation Henschke, Paul Gotthard in the 1860s, is considered among our most precious wine assets. Of those who have been lucky enough to try Hill of Grace, few will doubt the acclaim it receives. But what about Henschke’s other wines? A total of 31 wines make up the Henschke portfolio and whilst Hill of Grace could easily dominate page space, the wines that tell the rest of the family story are equally deserving of your attention.  Selector recently visited the Henschke family at Keyneton in the Barossa’s Eden Valley for a special tasting with fifth generation winemaker Stephen and his daughter, Justine, to flesh out the Henschke story beyond its flagship. The Grape Garden of Eden
The Henschkes call the elevated hills and plains of Eden Valley, specifically Keyneton, home. “The name Eden Valley is just gorgeous, conjuring up many things, so whoever called this place Eden Valley really knew what they were talking about,” explains Stephen. “South Australia has the reputation for being the driest state on the driest continent on the planet, but there are parts of it, like the Mount Lofty Ranges, that have an amazing climate. “At about 500 metres, we have four distinct seasons; from wet winters and mild, sunny springs through to mild to hot summers and dry autumns. “Those seasons, and the day-night temperature differential during the ripening period is the critical parameter for the low PH/high acidity that creates natural balance in the fruit and the resultant quality and purity of the wine. “For Riesling, it keeps acidity and minerality and you get fine, pure examples. You’ve got Shiraz that is much more elegant, textural and spicy; red fruits, black fruits and lovely velvety tannins – all driven by the climate.” Liquid History              
The first bracket of Rieslings quickly reinforced Stephen’s point, showing how fine-boned Eden Valley Riesling can be. Julius is named in celebration of Stephen’s great uncle Albert Julius, who was a stonemason and well known for his sculpting and war memorial work in Adelaide and the Barossa.  All three wines tasted expressed a fine but generous backbone of lime juice-like acidity that carried with it layers of concentrated citrus, just-ripe stonefruits, minerals and spices through the length of each wine. The 2002 Julius, with 15 years under its belt, expressed the ability for these wines to age gracefully and was still showing youthful floral aromatics, fleshy primary and secondary fruit flavours and a fresh, clean mouthfeel.  The consensus was that whilst mouth-watering, the 2016 was still in its infancy and needed time to show its true colours. The 2002 Julius was Stephen’s pick and he loved the amazing spicy, floral mix of the aromatics. Wine Selectors’ Head of Product Matt White had similar thoughts and remarked on the wine’s youth and poise. A bracket of exotic Gewürztraminers followed, again reinforcing how much of an impact the Eden’s warm days and cool nights have on coaxing fine and delicate flavours out of the aromatic grape varieties. Named after Joseph Hill Thyer, who planted the first vines on the family’s Eden Valley property, these wines are an expressive nod to the great European Gewürztraminers of Alsace. Heady aromas of musk, Turkish delight, lychee, rosewater and delicate blossoms are all things that you could see in all of the wines shown. In the mouth, tight and complex citrus flavour lines made way for fleshy red and green apples followed by a fine, clean finish. Justine was a fan of the 2016, believing that it had great potential to age, whilst my pick was the 2010 for its complexity, texture and classic European style. Next in the glass was a line-up of Louis Semillons, named after Louis Edmund Henschke, who managed the Hill of Grace Vineyard for four decades. Louis ran the vineyard organically and Stephen’s wife Prue, the Henschke viticulturist, has continued this philosophy, including biodynamics for soil and vine health. Once considered wacky, biondyamics is now recognised as best practice. Prue is a true leader in the field and much of the modern success and sustainability of the Henschke name needs to be attributed to her influence. The Louis wines are classic varietal examples of Semillon displaying lemon, lemon peel and citrus aromatics and flavours of lanolin, apples, and spice on the palate. The wines were stylistically unique, showing lots of open, fleshy complexity as young and older wines. The 2014 Louis and even the 2010, while still being fresh and youthful, were exhibiting loads of juicy, fleshy fruits that maintained all the way from start to finish. Matt loved the 2014 for its youth and purity, Justine the 2003 for its gracefully aged elements and creamy fruit and Stephen believed the 2014 to be a ‘complete’ wine with appealing complexity and structure. Heavenly
A collection of Abbotts Prayer wines came next and served as a neat segue into exploring another important regional chapter in the Henschke story – the Adelaide Hills. Stephen and Prue purchased an orchard at Lenswood in 1981 to plant cool climate varieties. The devastating Ash Wednesday fires of 1983 wiped out the orchard and Prue and Stephen then established vineyards. Abbotts Prayer is a single vineyard, Merlot Cabernet Sauvignon blend first produced in 1989 in acknowledgement of the region’s religious and cultural history. The wines are an elegant expression of cool climate intensity, but delivered with composure and finesse. The 1996 example gloriously demonstrated the ability to age beautifully by displaying surprising youth for a 21-year-old. The wines were sweet and spicy, delivering fine, orderly layers of blackberry, blueberry, mulberries and plums, the mouthfeel velveteen and the finish long. Whilst the 1996 was a favourite for its age, the 2012 was the standout for everyone involved. Stephen loved its elegance and power, Matt loved the complexity and Justine favoured its youthful balance and power. A fitting finale
Lastly we tasted Euphonium, dedicated to the Henschke Family Brass Band that was a favourite pastime of the early German-Silesian settlers in the Barossa from the 1840s. Keyneton Euphonium (formerly Keyneton Estate) is a Shiraz, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Cabernet Franc blend with each year delivering varying percentages. The wine is intense, rich and complex, displaying classic old world Hermitage characteristics: star anise, pepper, tar, dark berry, cigar box and sweet cassis aromas that make way to a concentrated but smooth palate of fleshy blackberries, mulberries and silky soft tannins. We all loved the 2002 Euphonium for its aged elegance, Justine favoured the 2009 for its savoury fruit construction, while Stephen loved the 2013 for its fruit-driven palate and fresh balance. Family Reflections It’s gratifying to know that each Henschke wine contains a part of their family story and each year they celebrate their history by turning soil, grape and sunlight into something delicious that can be shared and cherished. It’s even more gratifying that the wines are as great as the stories. Stephen fittingly and simply put the Henschke mantra into perspective. “Our whole philosophy is about being better not bigger. It’s about the quality, our amazing resources of old vineyards and making the most of our beautiful fruit and turning it into something really special.” Long may the stories continue. The Wines of the Tasting Henschke Julius Riesling 2016 A pure Eden Valley Riesling with power and finesse. Fresh and delicate lime blossom and kaffir lime aromatics lead to a mouth-watering palate of minerals, green apples and limes. A definite keeper. Henschke Keyneton Euphonium cabernet Blend 2013 An attractive, regal wine with complex aromatics of spice, plums, mulberries and blackberries. The palate is fine yet powerful with velvety, spicy layers of plums, blackberries and mocha. Henschke Louis Semillon 2014 A complex, well-structured Semillon with good cellaring potential. Fleshy, open aromatics of fresh and baked apples, preserved lemons and marzipan with a palate full of sugar snap peas, lemons and lime juice.    
Wine
Pinot Gris vs Grigio: What’s the difference?
Pinot Gris and Pinot Grigio are the same grape variety, so what's the difference? We talk to some passionate Pinot G winemakers to find out. While it's fast becoming one of Australia's most popular varieties,  PinotGris/Grigio  still presents a point of confusion for many wine-lovers. Made from one variety, a member of the Pinot Noir family, this grape has two different names thanks to the two countries in which it is most commonly grown: France and Italy. Gris is French for "grey" and in France it finds its home in the Alsace region. French Pinot Gris is generally known for being a rich, full-bodied white with a lovely silky texture. Grigio is the Italian for "grey" and in contrast to the French, Italian Grigio has made a name for being a light, crisp wine ideal for early drinking and is most famously known in the regions of Veneto and Friuli. Across the two styles, the common aroma and flavour descriptors include apple, pear, strawberry, honey, hay, brioche and bread. AUSSIE HOME
The variety was first introduced to the Hunter Valley with the James Busby collection of 1832, however it wasn't until the 1990s that the variety started to really emerge. This was thanks to a winemaking couple who made their home on Victoria's  Mornington Peninsula  in 1988: Kathleen Quealy and Kevin McCarthy. Having been introduced to Pinot Gris at college, Kathleen felt intuitively that they had come to the perfect region for producing the variety. They released their first commercial Pinot Gris in 1993, have had huge success since, and are now seen as setting the benchmark for Australian interpretations of the variety. Following in their footsteps is their son, Tom, a winemaker at Quealy wines who has inherited his parents' passion for Pinot G. What's more, he's been to the homes of both the Gris and Grigio styles. "I have worked vintages at Domain Paul Blanck in Alsace, where Pinot Gris is 1 of 4 premium varieties", he explains. "Their vineyards define the quality and the personality of each of their wines. They revel in the power and voluptuousness of these wines, from bone dry with the generous dollop of extract in the middle palate, to off dry with enough flavour and structure to make the wine balanced and suitable with a main course. They are able to make and market their even richer sweeter late harvest styles. The wines are beautiful to drink, slightly drying out with a few years bottle age, and suit their dishes of duck and pork. "I have also worked and spent time in Friuli. Their lighter soils and their food culture define their Pinot Grigio style: crunchy pear, dry and textured. The winemaking art of blending abounds. There are field blends and regional blends of many white varieties, with Pinot Grigio a central component." MORNINGTON MAGIC
Back home, Tom explains the  Mornington Peninsula 's superior suitability for Pinot G down to a combination of regional factors. "It's the climate - cool, maritime, Indian summers. It's the cloud cover and sea breezes. The Red Hill and Main Ridge flank creates intimate valleys of rich volcanic soils that hold onto the rainfall. The dryland farming keeps each berry and bunch tiny and concentrated. Then there's a winemaking fraternity reared on  Pinot Noir  and now applying these skills to their love child Pinot Gris."   ADELAIDE HILLS EXCELLENCE
Another standout Aussie Pinot G producer is  Wicks Estate  in the  Adelaide Hills , where, Tim Wicks, explains, "The cool evenings promote great acid retention in the fruit, along with a gradual flavour ripeness without excess phenolic development. This allows the variety to retain a charming aromatic lift which combines beautifully with the subtle textural elements." At Wicks Estate, they make a Gris rather than a Grigio, but as Tim describes, it may be akin to the Gris style, but it maintains a hint of the Grigio aromatics and racier acid lines. This is reflective of the Gris-Grigio overlap that Tim sees as common in Australia. "We have countless fantastic wines that tend towards either the richer Gris characters or lighter aromatic Grigio characteristics. There are also wines that exhibit traits of both, take our  Wicks Estate Pinot Gris , for example. We like the sharpened focus and aromatic style of the Grigio, but tend to lean towards the textural qualities of Gris on the palate. The styles have their own identity, however, we have diverse terroir and climate in Australia that can lend itself to a hybrid style."   THE PROOF IS IN THE TASTING At the end of the day, whether you go for a  richer Gris or a zestier Grigio , or a mix of both, only your palate can decide. To help you choose, we've got an extensive range from the Mornington Peninsula, Adelaide Hills and beyond to  explore  .
Two Blues Sauvignon Blanc 2014
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