Hand-selected wines from 500+
Australian wineries delivered to your door!
Hand-selected wines from 500+
Australian wineries delivered to your door!

Alert

The maximum quantity permitted for this item is , if you wish to purchase more please call 1300 303 307
Wine

Your Definitive Hunter Valley Cellar Door Guide and Map

Plan the perfect escape to the Hunter Valley wineries and cellar doors with our carefully curated guide, list, and map to this premier wine region. 

There’s a fantastic range of Hunter Valley cellar doors to visit within a two-hour drive from Sydney or a 40-minute trip from Newcastle. To help plan your trip to this dynamic wine region , we’ve selected a collection of wineries that provide the best cellar door experience, plus we’ve included a handy interactive map below.

While the region is famous for its ShirazChardonnay and Semillon , there’s also a stunning selection of innovative new varieties on offer. You can also find out more about the region in the Hunter Valley guide we’ve put together here.

HUNTER VALLEY WINERIES LIST

With so many great cellar doors in the region, we’ve grouped our list into journeys through the region along the Hunter Valley’s iconic roads. Take a trip from Pokolbin to Broke with a sojourn along Hermitage Road to visit the world class wineries of Tyrrell’s, Margan, De Iuliis and Andrew Thomas Wines on the alluvial flats. Or you can spend the day following McDonald’s Road through the heart of Pokolbin to visit the myriad of innovative wineries for which the Hunter Valley is renowned.

EXPLORE LOVEDALE

Journey through the heart of Lovedale via Wine Country Drive.

HUNGERFORD HILL AND MUSE RESTAURANT

The Hungerford Hill winery, designed by renowned architect Walter Barda, incorporates a spectacular barrel-shaped tasting room in which you can sample exemplary wines from the Hunter, as well as from the cool climate regions of Tumbarumba and the Hilltops of Southern New South Wales. Join the EPIC Tasting Experience Wednesday to Sunday between 11 am and 3 pm on a guided tasting of their limited release wines matched to bite-sized dishes prepared by the acclaimed Muse Restaurant and Cafe (reservations are essential).

2450 Broke Road, Pokolbin – view on our Hunter Valley cellar door map

Open Daily 10 am to 5 pm

Visit the Hungerford Hill website

DOMAINE DE BINET

Domaine de Binet is leading the charge for left of centre experimental wines, alternate varieties, and blends. It is rare to call in and not be able to chat to the entertaining husband and wife duo of Dan and Nat at this family-run winery.

467 Lovedale Rd, Lovedale – view on our Hunter Valley cellar door map

Open Friday to Sunday 10 am to 4 pm

Visit the Domaine de Binet website

HOPE ESTATE

Hope Estate is a destination in its own right with a great cellar door, the Hope Brewhouse, the Harvest Restaurant, and sweeping views of rolling vineyards and picturesque lakes.

2213 Broke Road, Pokolbin – view on our Hunter Valley cellar door map

Open Daily 10 am to 5 pm

Visit the Hope Estate website

PEPPER TREE WINES

The stunning grounds, the old convent, Circa 86 restaurant and the gardens that surround the Pepper Tree Wines cellar door are an essential stop on your next visit to the Hunter Valley. With their consistently high-quality wines, Pepper Tree are a stalwart of the Hunter Valley.

86 Halls Road, Pokolbin – view on our Hunter Valley cellar door map

Open Monday to Friday 9 am to 5 pm and Saturday to Sunday 9:30 am to 5 pm

Visit the Pepper Tree Wines website

EXPLORE BROKE AND HERMITAGE ROAD

Unearth the rustic township of Broke with a stop or two along Hermitage Road. 

TYRRELL’S

This salt of the earth Hunter Valley winery is a must-see destination, so is the tour of the old oak vats and the original red dirt cellar. Tyrrell’s have won many international medals and Trophies throughout their near 160-year history. Yet, they never rest on their laurels, continuing to impress on the world stage, earning respect as perhaps the most consistently high-achieving winery in the country.

1838 Broke Rd, Pokolbin – view on our Hunter Valley cellar door map

Open Mon – Sat 9 am to 5 pm; Sun 10 am to 4 pm

Visit the Tyrrell’s website

LEOGATE ESTATE WINES

Just along from Tyrrell’s is this distinctive cellar door and estate. A relative newcomer to the Hunter Valley, Leogate are quickly establishing themselves as a rising star due in no small part to securing accomplished winemaker Mark Woods to lead the winery.

1693 Broke Road – view on our Hunter Valley cellar door map

Open Daily 10 am to 5 pm

Visit the Leogate Estate website

MARGAN WINES & RESTAURANT

This striking Hunter Valley cellar door nestled amongst the vines is the perfect venue to sample their estate grown and made wines of a fine pedigree. This local focus translates to the superb Margan Restaurant, featuring ingredients from their kitchen garden, orchard, beehives and free range produce. Andrew Margan pioneered traditional and alternate varieties in the Broke region.

1238 Milbrodale Rd, Broke – view on our Hunter Valley cellar door map

Visit the Margan website

DE IULIIS WINES

This modern, architect designed cellar door matches perfectly with Michael De Iuliis’ carefully constructed wines. Given he won the 2015 Hunter Valley Winemaker of the Year at the Hunter Valley Legends awards, his wines are sure to impress. As is the view over the Brokenback Mountain Range from the observation tower.

1616 Broke Road – view on our Hunter Valley cellar door map

Open daily 10 am to 5 pm

Visit the De Iuliis website

HUNTER'S DREAM

Discover the unforgettable tranquility and beauty of the estate owned and managed by renowned health care company, Nature’s Care. Hunter’s Dream is one of the oldest boutique wineries in the region first established over a half a century ago. Now, many years and vintages later the newly opened cellar doors are producing an award wining collection under the guiding influence of winemaker Kees van de Scheur. Come and taste some of the best wines the lower Hunter has to offer amidst an oasis of sprawling lavender fields, ripe olive groves and a serene Japanese garden..

149 Deasys Road – view on our Hunter Valley Winery map

Open daily 10 am to 4 pm Mon-Fri 10 am to 4:30 pm Sat-Sun

Visit the Hunter's Dream website

DAVID HOOK WINES

Set in a provincial-style sandstone building, this boutique winery specialises in single vineyard drops from the Hunter’s traditional varieties of Semillon, Chardonnay, and Shiraz, as well as emerging grape varieties such as Pinot Grigio and Barbera. While you're there, you can explore the grounds, and surrounds of the Peppers Barrel Room or enjoy a spot of breakfast or lunch at Cafe Enzo.

Crn Broke & Ekerts Road, Pokolbin – view on our Hunter Valley Winery map

Open Daily 10 am to 4:30 pm

Visit the David Hook website

ANDREW THOMAS WINES

This sleek, boutique and modern cellar door is the perfect place to sample Thomas Wines’ uncompromising single vineyard wines. The 2014 Hunter Valley Winemaker of the Year, Andrew Thomas only produces the region's renowned varieties of Semillon and Shiraz, allowing your tasting experience to uniquely examine and note the subtle differences across a focused bracket of his medal and Trophy winning wines.

Cnr Hermitage Road and Mistletoe Lane, Pokolbin – view on our Hunter Valley Winery map

Open Daily 10 am to 5 pm

Visit the Andrew Thomas Wines website

KEITH TULLOCH WINES

The Keith Tulloch Wines estate is world class with its grand buildings and gorgeous courtyard encompassing the cellar door, winery, Muse Kitchen, and Cocoa Nib artisan chocolate cafe. The unique tasting experience out on the verandah overlooking the sprawling vineyard and Brokenback Mountain Range will make a memorable stop on your next visit to the Hunter Valley

Cnr Hermitage and Deasys Road, Pokolbin NSW – view on our Hunter Valley Winery map

Open daily 10 am to 5 pm

Visit the Keith Tulloch Wines website

EXPLORE THE HEART OF POKOLBIN

Explore the stunning array of new and old names along McDonalds Road with a stop at Pokolbin Village.

USHER TINKLER CELLAR DOOR AND SALUMI

Set in the original Pokolbin church, this cellar door renovated by Usher and Ebony Tinkler, blurs the lines between a traditional and contemporary wine experience. Their approach to wine tasting incorporates the food and wine lifestyle. Usher’s excellent wines can be accompanied with a superb range of local and imported Salumi and Cheese, making it a unique social destination.

97 McDonalds Rd, Pokolbin – view on our Hunter Valley Winery Map

Open Daily 10 am to 5 pm

Visit the Usher Tinkler website

AUDREY WILKINSON

As one of the oldest vineyards in the Hunter Valley, the Audrey Wilkinson Cellar Door and Winery is not to be missed on your next visit. The winemaking museum, housed in the original winery, the heritage-listed open cement vats and the spectacular views over their 270-acre winery are reason enough to visit. However, the true star is the spectacular selection of fine Semillon, Shiraz, and Verdelho on offer.

750 De Beyers Rd, Pokolbin – view on our Hunter Valley Winery Map

Open Daily 10 am to 5 pm

Visit the Audrey Wilkinson website

BROKENWOOD

Next door to McGuigan wines is Brokenwood, an institution in the Hunter Valley, consistently producing excellent wines and picking up awards for their Shiraz and Semillon. The friendly hospitality and the great selection of excellent wines for tasting are superb. The ‘tour & taste’, available for their members, offers the unique chance to explore the winemaking process and taste straight from the barrel!

401-427 McDonalds Rd, Pokolbin – view on our Hunter Valley Winery Map

Open Mon-Sat 9:30 am to 5 pm, Sunday 10 am to 5 pm

Visit the Brokenwood website

HART & HUNTER

Winemaking duo Jodie and Damien focus on sourcing the best fruit, letting the individual vineyards in each of their wines shine. This rustic cellar door is a great setting to experience the unique impact of the differing terroir in the Hunter Valley.

463 Deasys Rd, Pokolbin NSW 2320 – view on our Hunter Valley Winery Map

Open Thur-Sun 10 am to 4 pm

Visit the Hart & Hunter website

MCGUIGAN WINES

The quality and consistency of McGuigan Wines can’t be overstated, especially given they won the International Winemaker of the Year award in 2016 for a record 4th time. Stop by their relaxed cellar door to taste the wide range of quality wine on offer, or book for the tour of the winery, which departs daily at 12 noon. It is conveniently located next to the Hunter Valley Gardens, Hunter Valley Cheese Company and adjacent to Roche Estate in the heart of Pokolbin.

Corner of Broke & McDonalds Roads, Pokolbin NSW 2320 - view on our Hunter Valley Winery Map

Open Daily

Visit the McGuigan Wines Cellar Door

SMALL WINEMAKER’S CENTRE

This Hunter Valley cellar door has been showcasing the best of the Hunter Valley for 30 years. With an enviable line-up of winemakers such as the Little Wine Company, Thomas Wines, Silkman, David Hook and Hart & Hunter, the Small Winemaker’s Centre is a must visit for anyone seeking out the best boutique producers. From iconic Hunter Valley Semillon and Shiraz, to emerging varieties such as Vermentino, Barbera and Tempranillo, there are over 45 wines on offer. This is a very warm and welcoming cellar door with uber-friendly staff dedicated to guiding visitors on a wonderful wine journey.

426 McDonalds Rd, Pokolbin NSW 2320 – view on our Hunter Valley Winery Map

Open Daily 10 am to 5 pm

Visit the Small Winemaker’s Centre website

TAMBURLAINE ORGANIC WINES

As Australia’s largest producer of organic wines, Tamburlaine is a pioneer of innovative organic winemaking and vineyard management in the region. Incorporating practical and sustainable strategies, they continue to produce a swag of award-winning wine with a relaxed and generous approach, which translates through to their cellar door staff.

358 McDonalds Road Pokolbin – view on our Hunter Valley Winery Map

Open Daily 9 am to 5 pm

Visit the Tamburlaine website

TULLOCH WINES

Tulloch Wines are an institution in the Hunter Valley, who continually impress with the classic varieties that made them famous through to their innovative new varieties in their unique Cellar Door Release range. Their cellar door is excellent with casual tastings upstairs overlooking the stunning vista or with their pre-booked alternate variety tastings in their stunning restaurant downstairs.

638 De Beyers Rd, Pokolbin – view on our Hunter Valley Winery Map

Open daily 10 am to 5 pm

Visit the Tulloch Wines website

FIRST CREEK WINES

This cellar door is a hive of activity as one of the largest winemaking and bottling providers in the region. Many wineries and vineyards trust their precious drops to First Creek’s Chief Winemaker Liz Silkman, the Hunter Valley Winemaker of the Year in 2011 and 2016. With this unrivalled access to the region's best vineyards, it's little wonder First Creek have amassed an impressive 14 Trophies and 29 Gold medals since 2015.

600 McDonalds Rd Pokolbin - view on our Hunter Valley Winery Map

Open Daily Mon-Sat 9:30 am to 5 pm Sun 9:30 am to 4 pm

Visit the First Creek website

 

EXPLORE MOUNT VIEW

Rediscover the iconic wineries in the hills between Mount View and McDonald’s Road.

DRAYTON’S FAMILY WINES

This iconic cellar door, rebuilt recently after the tragic 2008 winery accident, has a long history stretching back to Joseph Drayton, who arrived in the Hunter in 1853. With a great range of traditional styles through to their renowned range of fortified and stickies, Drayton’s is well worth a visit.

555 Oakey Creek Rd, Pokolbin NSW 2320 - view on our Hunter Valley Winery map

Open Daily Mon-Fri 8 am to 5 pm, Sat-Sun 10 am to 5 pm

Visit the Drayton’s Family Wines Website

MT PLEASANT WINES

Mt Pleasant is an iconic, family-run Hunter Valley winery with a long and superb history of producing fine wine. The future is bright too, with Jim Chatto at the helm of their winemaking efforts, producing a growing range of alternate and innovative wines.

401 Marrowbone Road Pokolbin – view on our Hunter Valley Winery map

Open Daily 10am - 4pm

Visit the Mount Pleasant website

PETERSONS WINES

Situated on a small hill surrounded by vineyards, the position is perfect, with uninterrupted views of Mount Sugarloaf and the Watagan Mountains. This warm and friendly cellar door is the ideal place to taste their delightful award-winning wines.

552 Mount View Road Mount – view on our Hunter Valley Winery map

Open Mon-Sat 9 am to 5 pm Sunday 10 am to 5 pm

Visit the Petersons Wines website

Hunter Valley Winery Map

Planning a trip to the Hunter Valley? Download our interactive Hunter Valley winery map. To save on your browser or device, click here

For more information on visiting the Hunter Valley, be sure to visit the official Hunter Valley Wine Country website or stop by the Visitors Centre in Lovedale when you're in the area. But, if you’d like to sample some of the wineries listed in this guide before you visit, explore our wide selection of Hunter Valley wines and find out more about the wineries listed in this guide in our Meet the Makers section.

And, with our Hunter Valley Releases program, you can experience the best the Hunter Valley has to offer from the comfort of home. You’ll discover wines from regional icons such as Tyrrell’s and Tulloch, through to unique drops from the Valley’s leading boutique wineries. Visit our Hunter Valley Releases page to find out more!

You might also like

Wine
Cycling the Clare Valley Riesling Trail
Words by Elliot Watt on 6 Nov 2017
Discover the fun of cycling the Clare Valley Riesling Trail with Wine Selectors Membership Consultant, Elliot Watt, as he shares all his tips for touring through this spectacular wine region . Exercise and wine don’t usually go together, but, when you think about it, it's actually a genius combination. You are essentially cancelling out the damage done by one with the other. Well, in theory, anyway. Now a word of warning. We’re in no way suggesting you empty a bottle of wine into your drink bottle and hit the gym. There are far more attractive and much more appropriate places to achieve this symbiotic activity. A leisurely two-hour drive north of Adelaide will see you in Australia’s epicentre for Riesling , the Clare Valley, where you’ll find the Riesling Trail. This 35-kilometre-long cycling and walking track follows the path of the old rail line that sliced through the hills before it was irreparably damaged by the 1983 Ash Wednesday Bushfires. Today, the trail takes you past some of the region’s finest Riesling producers, so get ready to sip, sweat and cycle your way through the Clare Valley.  Clare
It all begins with a visit to the Riesling Trail Bike Hire to collect your trusty steed. Kent will size you up with the perfect bike and give you the local lowdown on the trail. Once in the saddle, an easy 12-minute ride north on the trail will take you to your first destination, Knappstein Enterprises Winery and Brewery . Originally established as the Enterprises Brewery in 1878, the current winery was installed by Clare Valley icon Tim Knappstein in the late 1960s. In 2006, 89 years after the original taps went dry, the brewing of beer started up once again in this heritage building. For Riesling lovers, definitely look to the Single Vineyard range, which is a perfect expression of the diversity in Clare Riesling. However, if you prefer a beer, then the delicious Knappstein Reserve Larger will quench your thirst and replenish the tank for the next leg of the journey.  Sevenhill and Penworth
Now you need to put in some hard yards and work off that wine and/or beer. Head south, 6km from Clare, and you’ll arrive in Sevenhill where it’s time to take a detour. John Horrocks Road is off the trail and runs through some seriously beautiful countryside, which will take your mind off the fact your legs are on fire. More importantly, it leads you to one of the jewels of the Clare Valley, Mitchell Wines . Andrew and Jane Mitchell established their winery in 1975 and have created something really special, showcasing a true Australian family-owned and run winery. On arrival, Jane welcomes you like you’re one of the family and you can tell her and Andrew are proud of their wines and vineyards and so they should be. Within their quaint cellar door, they present stunning single vineyard Rieslings, as well as Shiraz, Cabernet Sauvignon and Semillon. Now, it’s awfully hard to transport wine on a bike, trust me, I ride to work at Wine Selectors and constantly attempt to juggle wines home. However, not to worry, Jane will personally deliver any purchases direct to your accommodation that very same day.  Watervale
Departing Mitchell Wines, with a few more turns of the cog, you’ll be off the detour and back on the trail. This is where things start to go downhill, literally, not figuratively, as you’re now over the incline and can give the legs a rest as you glide through the rolling hills towards Watervale. As soon as you arrive, it’s essential to restore your energy with some carb loading and there’s no better place to do so than the Watervale General Store . It’s one of those charming country icons that is part café, part grocery store, part post office. The food is simple and delicious, but heed my warning, it's not wise to consume a full pizza and then carry on the trail as if you are riding in Le Tour De France. That pizza will come back to haunt you. Leasingham
With a full stomach and renewed energy, it shouldn’t take long to reach the next town of Leasingham and the home of Claymore Wines . Here you can wash down lunch with a glass of Dark Side of The Moon or Bittersweet Symphony . No idea what I’m talking about? Cleverly, the majority of their wines are labelled after hit songs from a bygone era . However, there are no gimmicks when it comes to the wines with some seriously good juice going on here. Sing your way through the range, find your favourite and sit down with a glass accompanied by a board of local South Australian Cheese. For a second in time, you will completely forget about your aching muscles and the fact you still have to ride home.  The Riesling Trail comes to an end a further five clicks south at the town of Auburn. Unfortunately, I cannot tell the tale of Auburn as Leasingham is as far as my legs would carry me. Some say, namely my wife, it was the pizza that lead to my ultimate demise however that’s neither here nor there.  Now begins the journey home, although it's not over yet. As any good bicycle wine tour strategist knows, you’re going to get thirsty, so Stone Bridge in Sevenhill is the perfect rehydration stop. Crafting not only exceptional Riesling but another 14 wines from 7 different grape varieties, Stone Bridge has something to quench any thirst. The aftermath Once off the bike if you stop moving things begin to hurt, the wine wears off and the lactic acid sets in. The only solution is to manoeuvre yourself directly to Seed Winehouse and Kitchen in Clare . Immersed in the simplistic stone and natural timber of the old chaff mill, you begin to imagine you are somewhere in rural Italy about to dine on local rustic cuisine. However, Head Chef Guy Parkinson is no Nonna, he may be better. Offering sophisticated A la Carte and degustation options, the menu highlights local produce with a wine list to reflect. Nearly 200 local and international wines will make the decision hard, add in 47 Gin choices and the mind begins to boggle. Whatever your decision there is no doubt any indulgence is guilt free. You have literally burned off three Big Macs during the ride so sit back, reward yourself and reflect on the beauty of the Clare Valley and the amazing wines it has to offer. Your Quick Guide to the Clare Valley Riesling Trail Wineries Knappstein Enterprises Winery and Brewery Mitchell Wines Claymore Wines Stone Bridge Restaurant Seed Winehouse and Kitchen in Clare Watervale General Store Bike Hire Riesling Trail Bike Hire
Wine
The Granite Belt: Beautiful One Day, Perfect Wine The Next
Words by Paul Diamond on 8 May 2017
Cool climate wines from Queensland – if that sounds strange, head to the  Granite Belt wine region  and you’ll find plenty! It’s well established that the first ‘official’ Australian wine region was Farm Cove NSW, planted by Captain Arthur Phillip in 1788. But what about the second? If you assumed it was in South Australia, Victoria or even Tasmania, you would be wrong.  It is, in fact, Queensland’s Granite Belt, planted in 1820, preceding Victorian and South Australian regions by 15-plus years. Given most of Queensland is hot and tropical, we usually associate it with beaches and reefs rather than grape vines. However, the Sunshine State has a rich and varied agricultural history and people are now starting to favour the Granite Belt’s cool climate, Euro-style wines. Three hours south west of Brisbane on the southern Darling Downs, the Granite Belt is situated around Queensland’s apple capital, Stanthorpe. This is heralded on your arrival by a massive apple on a pole, a bold indicator of local pride in the tradition of Coffs Harbour’s big banana, Ballina’s prawn and Goulburn’s Merino. Originally known as ‘Quart Pot Creek’, Stanthorpe was settled when tin was discovered in the late 1800s. Fruit production followed as the altitude and climate started to attract Italian immigrants who’d come to Australia to cut cane and then moved south to take up pastoral leases.  Cool Climb Wines As you travel south west from Ipswich along the Cunningham Highway, you start the gradual climb through the Great Dividing Range. By the town of Aratula, a popular resting spot, the temperature drops considerably and you realise how cool it gets at 110 metres above sea level.  The Granite Belt has some of Australia’s highest altitude vineyards and it is the associated cool climate that is the perfect setting for the region’s fine boned wines. So don’t visit this region expecting big, ripe wine styles that are popular in warmer areas. The cool climate dictates that the Granite Belt’s wine styles are closer to those of Europe. Think medium bodied, savoury reds with fine tannins and pronounced acidity. In the whites, expect lighter, citrus driven styles with elegant layers and fine acid lines. Adding to the Granite Belt’s wine identity is the fact it excels in alternative styles. While you’ll certainly find mainstream varieties like  Shiraz ,  Cabernet   and  Chardonnay , real excitement comes from discoveries like  Fiano ,  Vermentino , Chenin Blanc, Savagnin, Barbera, Graciano, Durif, Nebbiolo and Tannat. Granite Belt producers have long recognised that these varieties are the future and with their unique alternative identity, have dubbed themselves the ‘Strange Birds’ of the Australian wine scene. In fact, visitors can explore this fascinating region by following one of the Strange Bird Wine Trails. BOIREANN WINERY Established in the early 1980s by Peter and Therese Stark, Boireann has been a Granite Belt standout for decades. While quality and consistency are high, production is low, with reds the specialty and only a very small amount of  Viognier  grown to co-ferment with Shiraz. Standouts are their Shiraz Viognier, Barbera, Nebbiolo and the ‘Rosso’, a Nebbiolo Barbera blend. www.boireannwinery.com.au/ GOLDEN GROVE Third generation winemaker Ray Costanzo has made wine all over the world, but is passionate about the Granite Belt. Golden Grove is one of the oldest wineries in the region, making a wide range of wines including Sparkling Vermentino, Barbera, Nero d’Avola and  Tempranillo , but it is Ray’s  Vermentino  that has developed a solid following.  www.goldengroveestate.com.au JESTER HILL Established in 1993, Jester Hill is now a family affair, having been bought by ex-health professionals Michael and Ann Burke in 2010. With the new focus that Michael is bringing to the wines, the estate is building momentum and picking up accolades along the way. Standouts include their Roussanne, Chardonnay, Shiraz and  Petit Verdot .  www.jesterhillwines.com.au/ BALLANDEAN With an extraordinary history of winemaking that stretches back to the 1930s, the Puglisi family have been operating their cellar door and passionately flying the Granite Belt flag since 1970. Fourth generation Puglisis Leeane and Robyn are warm, generous, regional advocates, who have a large cellar door from which they love sharing their passion for both the wines and the people of the Granite Belt. Tasting highlights include their  Viognier , Opera Block Shiraz and Saperavi, a full-bodied red that originally hails from Georgia.   www.ballandeanestate.com/ JUST RED Another family-owned winery, Just Red is run by Tony and Julie Hassall with their son Michael and daughter Nikki. Just Red’s organic wines are styled on the great wines of the Rhône and are winning awards in the show system. Their star wines include Tannat,  Shiraz Viognier , Cabernet Merlot. www.justred.com.au/ RIDGEMILL ESTATE WINERY Starting its life as Emerald Hill in 1998, Ridgemill boasts a modern but unpretentious cellar door looking out on dramatic mountain surroundings. The broad range of wines is crafted by winemaker Peter McGlashan and includes Chardonnay, Shiraz,  Shiraz Viognier , Mourvèdre and Saparavi. With its self-contained studio cabins, Ridgemill is a great place to base yourself. www.ridgemillestate.com/ SYMPHONY HILL Symphony Hill’s winemaker Mike Hayes is quite possibly the Australian king of alternative wine varieties. Mike won the Churchill Fellowship and travelled around the world studying alternative styles. His wines are highly awarded, vibrant and interesting. A trip to the Granite Belt is not complete without a tasting with Mike, including his standout expressions of  Fiano , Lagrien, Gewürztraminer,  Petit Verdot and Reserve Shiraz. www.symphonyhill.com.au/ TOBIN WINE Adrian Tobin’s wines are a strong philosophical statement, reinforcing the notion that wine is made in the vineyard.  Since establishing Tobin Wine in 1999, Adrian has been deeply connected to his vines and produces a small amount of high quality Sauv Blanc, Semillon, Chardonnay, Merlot, Shiraz and Cabernet. All of Adrian’s wines are named after his grandchildren and are collectables.  www.tobinwines.com.au/ GIRRAWEEN ESTATE Steve Messiter and his wife Lisa started Girraween Estate in 2009. Small and picturesque, it is home to one of the region’s earliest vine plantings. They produce modest amounts of Sparkling wines, including Pinot Chardonnay along with Shiraz, Rosé and Sauv Blanc. Their table wines include Sauv Blanc, Chardonnay, Shiraz and Cabernet.  www.girraweenestate.com.au FEELING HUNGRY There is no shortage of good food in the Granite Belt, but a trip to  Sutton’s Farm  is essential. An apple orchard, it’s owned by David and Roslyn Sutton, who specialise in all things apple, including juice, cider and brandy. Their shed café also pays homage to the humble apple with the signature dish being home made apple pie served with Sutton’s spiced apple cider ice cream and whipped cream. For breakfast, try  Zest Café  located in town, where the coffee is fantastic and their baking game is strong. Their breakfast will definitely see you going back for seconds.  A delicious choice for lunch or dinner is the  Barrelroom and Larder , lovingly run by Travis Crane and Arabella Chambers.  Attached to Ballandean winery, the Barrelroom is casual in style and fine in output. Everything that Travis and Arabella cook comes from within a three hour radius and if it doesn’t exist in that area, they don’t cook it. A fantastic way to spend an afternoon is with Ben and Louise Lanyon at their  McGregor Terrace Food Project . Based in a Stanthorpe, this neighborhood bistro with a gorgeous whimsical garden offers cooking from the heart with the surrounds to match. Whether your choice is a Granite Belt alternative ‘Strange Bird’ or a more traditional varietal, take it along to Ben and Lou’s Food Project, sit out the back and you’ll feel like you’re in the south of France. You will, in fact, be in Queensland, thinking that it is a pretty cool place to be; literally and figuratively.     
Food
The taste of the Adelaide Hills
Words by Mark Hughes on 18 Jul 2017
We traipsed around the Adelaide Hills to discover the most divine food offerings in this picturesque wine region. Just 20 minutes drive from the centre of Adelaide you find yourself in the Adelaide Hills. The ascent from the city is 700 metres, making this a cool climate wine region boasting a range of award-winning wines such as  Pinot Noir ,  Chardonnay  and  Sparkling , as well as elegant  Shiraz , while it is arguably the home of  Australian Sauvignon Blanc . Alongside impressive wines, the  Adelaide Hills  has an array of sumptuous dining offerings. Here are some of the highlights recommended to me by locals during a recent trip to the region. CRAFERS The first village you come to in the Hills along the M1 from Adelaide is Crafers, and it is where you'll find the recently renovated Crafers Hotel. Retaining the 1830s heritage of the original structure, it offers a pub feel with a contemporary dining experience with dishes like beouf bourguignon and duck confit sitting alongside gourmet burgers. There's a range of craft beers on tap, but it is the wine list, or more appropriately, the wine cellar, that is something to truly behold. With an extensive range of local wines and South Australian gems, there's also some hard-to-find wines from Bordeaux and Burgundy. With boutique accommodation on site, you could be excused if you called in for lunch, but ended staying for the night. Crafers Hotel, 8 Main st, Crafers. Just up Mount Lofty Summit Road, is Mount Lofty House and the serious new addition to the Hills dining scene - Hardy's Verandah. A recent renovation has seen the long closed-in verandah opened up to become an exquisite dining space with breath-taking views across the Piccadilly Valley. The degustation menu from chef Wayne Brown is edgy and bold with a Japanese focus to local produce and a scintillating wine list curated by sommelier Patrick White. Hardy's Verandah 74 Mount Lofty Summit Rd, Crafers. SUMMERTOWN AND URAIDLA Follow Mount Lofty Summit Road and just a few enjoyable twists and turns up the hill you'll find yourself a culinary world away from Crafers at the Summertown Aristologist. This much-talked about venue is the collaboration of Aaron Fenwick, the former general manager at Restaurant Orana and winemakers Anton van Klopper (Lucy Margaux) and Jasper Button (Commone of Buttons). Housed in a former butcher shop, the vibe embodies a communal epicurean feel. Produce is sought from the kitchen garden or the community of farmers, while artisan bread is baked on premise. There is no set menu as the chef of the day chooses from what's available, but think grazing plates such as buckwheat, kombu and beets or artichoke, whey and ricotta matched with natural wines sourced primarily from the nearby Basket Range sub-region. Friday, Saturday and Sundays for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Summertown Aristologist, 1097 Greenhill road, Summertown . Keep the communal vibe going and follow Greenhill Road down into Uraidla, where winemaker of the moment, Taras Ochota from Ochota Barrels, has teamed up with a couple of mates to open Lost in a Forest - a wood oven/wine lounge in the beautifully remodelled St Stephens Anglican Church. Marco Pierre White called these 'the best pizzas he's ever eaten' courtesy of chef Nick Filsell's intriguing offerings such as cider braised pulled pork pizza with pickled vegetables, mozzarella and pork crackle, topped with housemade sriracha mayo. The bar features wines from nine Basket Range producers, as well as a range of exotic spirits. Lost in a Forest, 1203 Greenhill Rd, Uraidla. STIRLING If in Crafers you decided to get back on the M1 further into the Hills just a few minutes' drive you'll see the turn off for the impossibly beautiful town of Stirling. Its tree-lined main street features boutique shops and a number of cool eateries including The Locavore. As the name suggests, this intimate venue adheres to the 100 mile rule with all produce and wine sourced locally and used thoughtfully in Modern Australian tapas style offerings. The Locavore, 49 Mount Barker Rd, Stirling . Just down the road is the Stirling Hotel, a beautifully renovated pub with a fine dining bistro, grill and pizza bar. Not quite the level of a gastro pub, the food is wholesome and hearty with a substantial wine list. But the highlight is its Cellar & Patisserie. Located in separate premises behind the hotel, it serves a range of mouth-watering pastries, pies and breads and coffee from five different roasters. Stirling Hotel, 52 Mount Barker Rd, Stirling . BRIDGEWATER Just a few clicks up the M1 from Stirling (or along the more scenic route through Aldgate) you'll find an icon of the Adelaide Hills dining scene, the Bridgewater Mill. The former 1860s flour mill was turned into a fine dining restaurant in 1986 by wine industry legends Brian Croser and Len Evans. A few years ago, Seppeltsfield's Warren Randall bought the venue and gave it a major overhaul including a new wine bar and extending the outdoor deck. Local Hills chef Zac Ronayne delivers delicious seasonal offerings enjoyed by the fire in winter, or on the deck overlooking the huge working wheel in the summer. Bridgewater Mill, 386 Mount Barker Rd, Bridgewater . HAHNDORF The main strip of the historic village of Hahndorf is very touristy and you can find any number of German-inspired pubs where you can eat your weight in bratwurst, but there are two gems in Main Road as well. The Seasonal Garden Café celebrates local produce delivered as delicious wholesome meals such as salads, slow-roasted lamb as well as vegetarian options. Be sure to check out the delightful and relaxing kitchen garden out the back. Seasonal Garden Cafe, 79 Main Rd, Hahndorf Satisfy your sweet tooth at Chocolate @ Number 5. Famed for its waffles and exotic hot chocolates, there's also a range of decadent desserts, chocolate truffles and pralines and coffee sourced from a small batch roastery. Chocolate @ Number 5, 5 Main Rd, Hahndorf. Pay a visit to the iconic Beerenberg farm shop before taking the Balhannah Road north to the The Lane Vineyard and Restaurant, where you are greeted with sweeping views across the region. Chef James Brinklow has created delicious seasonal recipes and also offers the Lane Kitchen's Chef's Table experience - scores of dishes matched with wine across an indulgent three hour sitting. The Lane Vineyard and Restaurant, 5 Ravenswood Lane, Hahndorf . WOODSIDE Woodside Cheese features on many menus around the Hills. Being so close, take the Onkaparinga Valley Road and see artisan cheesemaker Kris Lloyd, winner of over 100 awards, including a Super Gold at the 2016 World Cheese Awards for her Anthill - a fresh goat cheese encrusted with green ants - she's been experimenting with a variation that includes lemon myrtle, as well as doing the country's first raw milk cheese. An innovator in the industry, she is a must-visit in the Adelaide Hills. Woodside Cheese Wrights, 22 Henry St, Woodside . A bit further along Onkaparinga Valley Road you'll find Bird in Hand winery. Everything about this place is impressive. Picturesque vineyards, incredible artwork and a top class restaurant, The Gallery. Carlos Astudillo has recently taken over as Chef de Cuisine and has introduced a farm-to-table rotation of dishes with produce sourced directly from local growers and Bird in Hand's kitchen garden. Open every day for lunch, take on one of the two lunchtime dining experiences, Signature Flight, a share-style menu or the more immersive Joy Flight - an exciting seasonal culinary journey that unfolds over three delectable hours, best enjoyed with matching Bird in Hand wines, of course. The Gallery, Corner of Bird in Hand & Pfeiffer Roads, Woodside . Another winery with a stellar restaurant is Howard Vineyard just 10 minutes drive back up the hill to Narnie.  MasterChef  alumni Heather Day has taken over the reins at the recently renovated Clover Restaurant and she's serving up some of the exotic, fresh flavours of Vietnam, Cambodia, Thailand and China. The venue hosts acoustic Sunday Sessions and the lush green lawn outside the cellar door is the perfect spot to soak up some cool musical vibes and feast on Heather's delicious Asian dishes. Clover Restaurant, Howard Vineyard 53 Bald Hills Road, Nairne . VERDUN If you follow the signs from Woodside  back to Adelaide, you'll pass through Verdun, where there are three final additions to your Hills culinary journey. The Stanley Bridge Hotel is still an 'old school' pub, with a 1970s carpet and undulating floor. And that's its charm. With its cosy inside dining with dishes such as mushroom gnocchi and marinara linguine, it is finding favour with the hip crowds on the weekend who kick on out the back on the petanque rink and frequent the caravan-cum-bar. Stanley Bridge Tavern 41 Onkaparinga Valley Rd, Verdun . Only a couple of hundred metres up the road is the Walk the Talk Café. Housed in the old Verdun Post Office (locals still pop in to get their mail) chef/caterer Ali Seedsman and her partner Russell Marchant have opened a funky but unpretentious café. Ali's stellar pedigree (Bayswater Brasserie, Bathers Pavilion, Magill Estate) is evident on the menu - simple but sumptuous shared plates and housemade cakes and pastries. Walk the Talk Café, 25 Onkaparinga Valley Rd, Verdun . Still in Verdun, just before you get back on the M1 back to Adelaide, swing up the hill to Maximilian's, acknowledged as one of the best regional restaurants in the state. Casual shared plates, a la carte and chef's degustation journeys matched with wines from the on-site Sidewood Cellar Door. The venue also offers gorgeous views across the lake and vineyard. Maximilian's Restaurant 15 Onkaparinga Valley Rd, Verdun .
Two Blues Sauvignon Blanc 2014
1 case has been added to your cart.
Cart total: xxx
1 case, 12 bottles, 3 accessories