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Food

Curtis Stone’s grilled 80 day dry-aged ribeye with creamed corn and charred scallions

Preparation time
15 mins, plus 10 mins resting time
Cooking time
40 mins
Serves

 

Ingredients

  • 4 large ears of sweet corn husked, divided
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 tbsp butter
  • Kosher salt & freshly ground black pepper
  • Extra-virgin olive oil, for drizzling
  • 2 x 700g 80-day dry-aged bone-in ribeye steaks (5cm thick, spinalis attached)
  • 8 scallions

Method

  1. First, make the corn stock for the creamed corn. Working over piece of parchment paper on cutting board, grate 3 ears of corn, (we use a Lee’s corn cutter) making sure to pass corn over cutter multiple times to collect all corn kernels and corn ‘milk’ from cobs. Carefully transfer corn kernels and corn milk to medium bowl and reserve (there should be about 11/2 cups corn).
  2. Cut each spent corn cob into 3 pieces and place in medium saucepan with 4 cups water. Bring mixture to boil over medium-high heat, reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer for about 30 minutes, or until liquid has reduced by about half and has taken on corn flavor. Strain corn stock. Discard cobs.
  3. To make creamed corn, prepare grill for indirect high heat. For charcoal grill: Fill chimney starter with hardwood lump charcoal and ignite. When coals are covered with white ash, dump them in an even layer on one half of grill, leaving other half of grill empty. Place grill grate in position. Preheat grill grate for 5 minutes. For gas grill: Preheat all burners to high heat. Before grilling, turn half of burners off.
  4. Grill remaining ear of corn, turning as needed, for about 10 minutes, or until kernels are deeply charred all over.
  5. Allow corn to cool slightly, then cut off kernels and reserve kernels.
  6. In medium heavy skillet over medium heat, heat olive oil. Add reserved grated corn, including its juices. Cook for about 2 minutes, or until most of moisture in corn mixture has cooked out. Add 1/4 cup reserved corn stock and cook for about 2 minutes, or until most of liquid has cooked out. Repeat process 3 more times to use total of about 1 cup corn stock. Stir in reserved charred corn kernels and cook for 30 seconds to rewarm. The consistency at this point should be similar to risotto. Remove pan from heat and stir in butter. Season with salt and pepper.
  7. To grill steaks and scallions, pat steaks dry with paper towels. Lightly coat each steak with oil and season liberally with kosher salt (about 2 teaspoons) and freshly ground black pepper (about 1 teaspoon). Place steaks on unlit side of grill and cover grill. Cook, flipping over halfway through cooking, for about 30 minutes, or until center of steaks registers 43°C on an instant-read thermometer.
  8. Place steaks directly over lit coals, and cook, turning as needed, for about 5 minutes, or until both steaks have charred crust and an internal temperature of 52°C to 54°C for medium-rare. Set steaks aside to rest for 10 minutes.
  9. Grill scallions on hottest part of grill, rotating as needed for about 4 minutes, or until they are charred.
  10. To serve, cut meat from bone and separate eye of ribeye (center piece of meat) from spinalis (outer piece of meat) by cutting through fat that separates the two pieces. Carve each separate piece against grain and serve with creamed corn and scallions.
Food
Preparation time
15 mins, plus 10 mins resting time
Cooking time
40 mins
Serves

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Words by Mark Hughes on 2 Jul 2015
When Lucio Galletto opened up a restaurant in the Sydney suburb of Paddington he didn’t truly envisage that it would become a cultural icon, as much an art gallery as an Italian trattoria. But due to the warm generosity of the restaurateur and clientele, this is exactly what has happened. Adorning the restaurant’s walls are works by some of the biggest names in Australian art such as Sidney Nolan, John Olsen and Garry Shead, to name but a few. The story of how this all came about and how it has helped develop his food is detailed in Lucio’s latest book, The Art of Traditional Italian. Childhood memories Lucio has always been surrounded by food, and by art. He grew up in a village on the Ligurian coast of Italy where his parents had a restaurant. He recalls the fun and convivial nature of his parents serving both friends and strangers. Almost as vividly, he recalls being mesmerised by the ornate and detailed sculptures, paintings and architecture of his poor, but culturally rich, local church. The combination has had a long and lasting affect on Lucio. So when it came to be that he opened the doors of Lucio’s in 1981 he was determined to extend the same welcoming nature that his parents had shown at their restaurant. By chance, Paddington was home to an artists’ studio, which many of Sydney’s up and coming painters and sculptures used as their creative centre, and for many of these, Lucio’s became their second home. The art evolves “Artists started to come in and some started giving me their work because they found out that I had a love of art, and so it happened,” recalls Lucio. “We didn’t plan this, we didn’t say ‘let’s make an art restaurant’, it just happened over years. “It all started with Sidney Nolan. He was involved with the movie Burke and Wills as an advisor. When they finished filming each day he would come in to eat. One time he drew a little artwork on a napkin and left it behind. I was really taken with it. You know, beautiful gold leaf – I put it up on the wall. “Well, that was the first piece of art on the wall. And when Sidney came back he looked up and saw his art and he was really taken with the fact I had given it so much love. After that he gave me some more drawings and the other art pieces. I think from that, the artists understood that I love art and artists, I look after their work. I am really honoured that they put their work up on the walls of my restaurant. It’s a great honour for me… and it all turned up by chance. “I have some great artists that come to the restaurant and they draw on napkins, plates, or in the oyster shells. They feel really at home and comfortable, and it makes me feel good that I have created this feeling, to be able to collaborate, because of the hospitality, the conviviality of my restaurant.” The Art of Traditional Italian by Lucio Galletto with photography by Ben Dearnley (Penguin) RRP $59.99
Two Blues Sauvignon Blanc 2014
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