Hand-selected wines from 500+
Australian wineries delivered to your door!

Alert

The maximum quantity permitted for this item is , if you wish to purchase more please call 1300 303 307
Food

Curtis Stone’s grilled 80 day dry-aged ribeye with creamed corn and charred scallions

Preparation time
15 mins, plus 10 mins resting time
Cooking time
40 mins
Serves

 

Ingredients

  • 4 large ears of sweet corn husked, divided
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 tbsp butter
  • Kosher salt & freshly ground black pepper
  • Extra-virgin olive oil, for drizzling
  • 2 x 700g 80-day dry-aged bone-in ribeye steaks (5cm thick, spinalis attached)
  • 8 scallions

Method

  1. First, make the corn stock for the creamed corn. Working over piece of parchment paper on cutting board, grate 3 ears of corn, (we use a Lee’s corn cutter) making sure to pass corn over cutter multiple times to collect all corn kernels and corn ‘milk’ from cobs. Carefully transfer corn kernels and corn milk to medium bowl and reserve (there should be about 11/2 cups corn).
  2. Cut each spent corn cob into 3 pieces and place in medium saucepan with 4 cups water. Bring mixture to boil over medium-high heat, reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer for about 30 minutes, or until liquid has reduced by about half and has taken on corn flavor. Strain corn stock. Discard cobs.
  3. To make creamed corn, prepare grill for indirect high heat. For charcoal grill: Fill chimney starter with hardwood lump charcoal and ignite. When coals are covered with white ash, dump them in an even layer on one half of grill, leaving other half of grill empty. Place grill grate in position. Preheat grill grate for 5 minutes. For gas grill: Preheat all burners to high heat. Before grilling, turn half of burners off.
  4. Grill remaining ear of corn, turning as needed, for about 10 minutes, or until kernels are deeply charred all over.
  5. Allow corn to cool slightly, then cut off kernels and reserve kernels.
  6. In medium heavy skillet over medium heat, heat olive oil. Add reserved grated corn, including its juices. Cook for about 2 minutes, or until most of moisture in corn mixture has cooked out. Add 1/4 cup reserved corn stock and cook for about 2 minutes, or until most of liquid has cooked out. Repeat process 3 more times to use total of about 1 cup corn stock. Stir in reserved charred corn kernels and cook for 30 seconds to rewarm. The consistency at this point should be similar to risotto. Remove pan from heat and stir in butter. Season with salt and pepper.
  7. To grill steaks and scallions, pat steaks dry with paper towels. Lightly coat each steak with oil and season liberally with kosher salt (about 2 teaspoons) and freshly ground black pepper (about 1 teaspoon). Place steaks on unlit side of grill and cover grill. Cook, flipping over halfway through cooking, for about 30 minutes, or until center of steaks registers 43°C on an instant-read thermometer.
  8. Place steaks directly over lit coals, and cook, turning as needed, for about 5 minutes, or until both steaks have charred crust and an internal temperature of 52°C to 54°C for medium-rare. Set steaks aside to rest for 10 minutes.
  9. Grill scallions on hottest part of grill, rotating as needed for about 4 minutes, or until they are charred.
  10. To serve, cut meat from bone and separate eye of ribeye (center piece of meat) from spinalis (outer piece of meat) by cutting through fat that separates the two pieces. Carve each separate piece against grain and serve with creamed corn and scallions.
Food
Preparation time
15 mins, plus 10 mins resting time
Cooking time
40 mins
Serves

SHARE

Two Blues Sauvignon Blanc 2014
1 case has been added to your cart.
Cart total: xxx
1 case, 12 bottles, 3 accessories

You might also like

Food
Sweet Creator: Anna Polyviou
Words by Jackie MacDonald on 8 Mar 2018
To be a successful pastry chef, it pays to follow the rules. Except if you’re Anna Polyviou. Then you take the rules, stick them in a blender and dye them pink. Vanilla is not a word you’d associate with Anna Polyviou. Far from ordinary, Sydney’s punk of pastry with her pink mohawk and facial piercings is a self-dubbed ‘sweet creator’ making a colourful impression.  In actual fact, vanilla is her favourite ingredient and while it might not be an in-your-face element, it’s fundamental to so many classic desserts. And that’s where it all begins when you become a pastry chef. You have to learn the classics to be able to build on them.  For Anna, the classics are those of her Greek heritage. One of her favourites is Loukoumades, Greek donuts, which, Anna describes, were a staple of her childhood church, where they were served fresh to the hungry congregation. “The old ladies would be pushing them through their hand and flipping them over and frying them and they were always perfectly round,” she recalls. “I used to go there just to eat, Mum would be like ‘Where is she? Why isn’t she in church?’ and I’m out there eating!”
While Anna always had a sweet tooth, the fact that she became a pastry chef was, she says, “a mistake.” She started out as an apprentice kitchen chef, but, she describes, “I was a bit of a wild child, all those nerdy chefs were sitting there really paying attention and I was out partying and having a great time.”  On the verge of losing her apprenticeship, Anna was thrown a lifeline by way of the chance to participate in a cooking competition with a team of four apprentices. Her role: pastry.  “I had no idea about pastry, so I went in every single day to learn,” she says.  When the big day arrived, though, her hard work went unrecognised.  “I lost that competition,” she recalls, “but I had given so much of my time and energy and I remember crying in the corner and saying to Mum, ‘I don’t understand, I did so well and my dessert was honestly better than everyone else’s.’ That’s how I saw it.”  But like most sensible mums, Anna’s saw the valuable lesson in the loss.  “She was like, ‘My daughter really needs to know how to lose before she learns to win.’” 
For the full story and recipes from Anna, pickup a copy of Selector  from all good newsagents, subscribe or look inside your next Wine Selectors delivery.
Food
Adam Liaw asks are we really what we eat?
Words by Adam Liaw on 3 Sep 2018
In his new book, Destination flavour Adam Liaw examines the many cuisines of the world, so who better to ask, ‘what is  Australia’s food identity?’ The discussion on Australia’s food identity in this country might be the longest conversation we’ve ever had with the fewest words spoken. There’s no doubt we love our food, but we also find it difficult to put our finger on exactly what it is.  Have you ever been asked by somebody abroad about Australian food, only to mumble something like “Oh, we eat all kinds of stuff…” and change the subject? How can we describe the taste of home? The Pros There are, of course, things we do very well. Our diversity of cuisine is the best in the world. We might assume the rest of the world eats as widely and as well as we do, but they don’t even come close. Our cuisine has drawn from all over for centuries, and we flit from one inspiration to the next with barely a thought.  A chiko roll and a couple of dim sims might not seem the most exciting example of Australian food, but in the 1980s, for the descendants of Irish stew and siu mai respectively to sit together so comfortably and mainstream? It wouldn’t be possible in any other country. Others may match us for British, American and European influence, but nowhere covers the breadth of Asian cuisines as well as we do, and that includes the countries of Asia.  The overall quality of our produce is also truly impressive. There are many countries with greater biodiversity and where many ingredients surpass our quality, but as a complete package, if I could visit one good greengrocer, butcher and fishmonger in any country to make a meal, I’d do that right here at home.
For the full story and recipes from Adam, pickup a copy of the Sept/Oct 2018 Selector issue from all good newsagents,  subscribe  or look inside your next Wine Selectors delivery. OUT NOW: Destination Flavour People and Places by Adam Liaw (Hardie Grant, RRP $50). 
Two Blues Sauvignon Blanc 2014
1 case has been added to your cart.
Cart total: xxx
1 case, 12 bottles, 3 accessories