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Food

David Henry’s toothfish with shiitake suimono, black rice and crisp enoki

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Being so rich with a buttery texture, Toothfish is a superb match with a traditional-style Chardonnay. We think the Star Picket Chardonnay 2015 from the Hunter Valley would be a perfect pairing with this dish. Flavoursome, stylish and strongly varietal, it features sweet stonefruit and hints of honey and nougat supported by fresh vanillin oak and lemony acidity.

INGREDIENTS

Toothfish

12 x 160g Toothfish portions

Sunflower oil

Salt

 

Shiitake aioli

100g dry shiitake

2 tbs dark soy

1 tbs sugar

200ml Japanese mayo

 

Black rice wafer

150g black rice

1 x stick cinnamon

1 star anise

1tsp Chinese 5 spice salt

 

Dill oil

1 bunch dill

150ml olive oil

 

Shiitake suimono

1L chicken stock

100ml dark soy

350ml mirin

2 star anise

1 cinnamon stick

1 long red chilli

20g ginger (fine ground)

20g sugar (fine ground)

½ lime

60ml rice vinegar

60g dry shitake

 

Zucchini spaghetti

2 medium zucchinis

 

Crisp enoki

100g enoki mushrooms

½ cup plain flour

1L grapeseed oil

METHOD

1. For the shiitake aioli, soak shiitake mushroom in hot water for one hour. Strain and keep mushroom stock. Slice mushroom and simmer in the soy, sugar and mushroom stock for one hour until mushrooms are tender. Cool mushrooms, blend in processor until finely chopped. Add Japanese mayo (or substitute for freshly made mayo) and blend for 30 seconds.

2. For black rice wafer, simmer rice with spices for 30-40 minutes until rice is soft. Remove cinnamon stick and star anise then blend in food processor until smooth. Spread 2mm thick onto baking paper on baking tray and dehydrate in oven at 60°C for 4-5 hours until dry and crisp. Deep fry in hot oil at 190°C until crispy.

3. Dill oil: Pick dill leaves off the stem. Heat oil to 122°C then add dill and blend in food processor for 2 minutes until oil is green.
Set aside.

4. Shitake suimono: Add all ingredients into
a pot and simmer for 30 minutes then strain.

5. Zucchini spaghetti: Peel and julienne with papaya peeler. Blanch for 20 seconds. Refresh in ice water.

6. Enoki mushrooms: Loosen enoki mushrooms and dust in flour. Heat pan
with grapeseed oil and fry enoki until crisp. Set aside.

7. Cooking Toothfish: Lightly salt skin. Place pan on stove top on medium-high heat. Oil the pan, place fish skin down for 1 minute and then into oven at 180°C for 5 minutes. (Handy tip: if pan is not hot enough, the skin will stick to the pan.)

8. To serve: In a bowl plate, place 100ml
of shiitake suimono. Zucchini is placed next. Place cooked Toothfish next with skin facing upwards. A teaspoon of aioli, followed by crisp enoki. Place black rice wafer on side
of fish.

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Over 100 years ago, Alfred Haigh had grand plans for his new business, but he never would have dreamed of the love the world has developed for his family’s chocolate.  While wine-lovers know South Australia as the home of multi-generational family-owned wineries – Yalumba , Henschke , d’Arenberg , to name a few – for chocolate lovers, the state is synonymous with the multi-generational Haigh family. Today, Haigh’s is in the hands of the fourth generation and in 2015 celebrated its centenary – one of only a few Australian enterprises to have family maintained continuity for 100 years. Beehive Beginnings
The first Haigh’s store opened in Adelaide’s historic Beehive Building in 1915, the dream of Alfred Haigh. Having been a confectioner’s shop, the business came with the former owner’s equipment, moulds, recipes and books – everything a budding self-taught confectioner needed to perfect his craft. Following Alf was his son, Claude, who kept the business humming through the trials of the Depression and war years, while also establishing a name in the thoroughbred racing industry. The 1950s saw Claude’s son John take over after a stint working at Lindt & Sprüngli in Switzerland. This experience was invaluable for both John and Haigh’s, as on his return, he set about revamping the family’s chocolate-making operations. John has been succeeded by his sons, Alister and Simon, who continue the family tradition of producing premium chocolate and expanding the company’s retail network, selling Haigh’s products all over Australia. A caring approach With an eye to Haigh’s continuing well into the future, the family is committed to the environment and sustainability. As such, 80% of its cocoa beans are UTZ-certified , which ensures traceability back to the grower and a fair return for producers and improving the lives of the farming community. The family also prides itself on its cultural, philanthropic and conservation work. So next time you’re savouring a Haigh’s truffle, relishing an Easter bilby or luxuriating in their Original Fruit Chocolates, consider the legacy of quality behind every bite. View the range instore or at  haighschocolates.com.au
Two Blues Sauvignon Blanc 2014
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