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Food

David Thompson’s Minced prawn and pork soup with Asian greens

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Complement this aromatic dish with an aromatic white like Gewürztraminer. The Leogate Brokenback Vineyard Gewürztraminer 2015 from the Hunter Valley is pristine and delicate with layers of varietal flavour, soft yet zesty acidity and just a hint of sweetness.

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 tbsp peeled Thai garlic
  • 1 coriander root, chopped
  • Pinch sea salt
  • Pinch white pepper
  • 3 tbsp rendered pork fat
  • 1 tsp roasted sesame oil
  • 4 coarsely minced prawns
  • 4 tbsp minced pork belly
  • 1 tbsp dried prawns
  • Good pinch rinsed dtang chai – dried cabbage
  • Handful Chinese cabbage leaves,
  • cut into large slices
  • Handful choy sum, cut into lengths
  • Small handful Asian celery, chopped
  • 2 cups stock
  • 2 tbsp fish sauce
  • Pinch white sugar
  • 1 tsp chopped spring onions
  • Pinch ground white pepper

METHOD

1. Make a slightly coarse paste from the garlic, coriander, salt and white pepper.

2. Heat the fat, add the oil and fry the garlic paste until golden then add minced prawns along with the pork, dried prawns and dtang chai until almost cooked. Add the Asian vegetables and fry for a moment.

3. Moisten with the stock and bring to
the boil.

4. Skim and simmer until the vegetables
are cooked.

5.  Season with the fish sauce and sugar.

6. Add the spring onions.

7. Sprinkle with white pepper, to taste.

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