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Tomich | Wines of the Season

Environmental dedication

Third generation winemakers, the Tomich family proudly own one of the best vineyard sites in the Adelaide Hills. Dedicated to sustainable growing practices, they combine new and traditional methods to not only help the environment, but also to enhance the quality of their fruit. 
The Tomich family's approach is brought to life in their logo as one of the signs of a healthy vineyard is plenty of healthy bees. 

Tasting Notes

This dedication to outstanding quality has certainly paid off with their 2015 Woodside Vineyard Chardonnay having won two Gold medals, a Silver and a Bronze. 
Opening with aromas of creamy ripe white nectarines and apples, it has a lovely round mouthfeel with clean and crunchy flavours from pure stone fruits. A crisp and fresh, yet rich Chardonnay.


The 2015 Vintage

2015 experienced warm days, cool nights and no rain, which meant that harvest was finished by the end of March, and the quality and yields of fruit were excellent. Despite the threat from January’s bushfire, Adelaide Hills grape growers and winemakers celebrated the best vintage in ten years with white and red wines showing the colours and flavours that only come after a long, dry summer and autumn.

+ Food 

A truly versatile wine matching beautifully with classic Australian fish ‘n' chips through to richer spaghetti vongole style dishes.

Tomich City Cellar Door 
87 King William Road, Unley, SA
tomich.com.au
0477 828 

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Two Blues Sauvignon Blanc 2014
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