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Wine

Wine Traveller Mornington Peninsula

Just an hour’s drive from Melbourne, the Mornington Peninsula is a slice of paradise with its alluring blend of calm bays, eucalypt forests, farmland and surfable southern swells. It is also a mecca for quality produce, from strawberries to apples, olives to cheese, and of course, wine. The cool maritime climate allows for elegant Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, along with a host of alternative varietals, and it is the recognised birthplace of Pinot Grigio in Australia.

While wine has long attracted visitors, the region’s culinary offerings have also been garnering plenty of praise of late. Many are located in wineries and one of the first you’ll find just off the Mornington Peninsula Freeway from Melbourne is Yabby Lake. Winemaker Tom Carson is renowned in these parts and his award-winning wines provide the perfect match to the delicious seasonal fare served up by chef Simon West at their relaxed cellar door and restaurant. Think asparagus and gorgonzola tart enjoyed on the verandah overlooking the vineyards. 

Not far down the freeway near Dromana is a man and a place of legendary status – Garry Crittenden from Crittenden Estate. Garry planted one of the first vineyards in the region over 35 years ago. These days, his son Rollo is winemaker, producing classy flagships and unique alternative varietals. On the picturesque Crittenden Estate, you’ll find gorgeous lakeside villas and the delightful Stillwater at Crittenden Restaurant. Originally a small café built by Garry’s wife Margaret, it was taken over by dynamic duo Zac and Jacqui Poullier, who impress with a menu of shared plates and a la carte dishes such as corn fed duck breast with boulangere potato, pumpkin puree and local cherries. 

Just up the road sits Foxey’s Hangout. Two decades ago, brothers Michael and Tony Lee made a tree change, trading in their Melbourne-based hospitality business for a life making wine on the Peninsula. Pop in for a wine tasting, then grab a deck chair on the verandah and enjoy seasonal shared plates while overlooking the sloping vineyard.

Everything and anything

You’ll find both ends of the food spectrum in this amazing region. Rebecca Ettridge started Wombat Café, the Mornington Peninsula’s first all vegan café, which sits in a row of shops opposite a series of walking trails towards Dromana. It serves breakfast, lunch and a range of take home meals as well as awesome organics smoothies such as the High Roller – banana, chia seeds, peanut butter, vanilla and almond milk topped with peanut crumble. 

Up the rise to Red Hill and along Arthur’s Seat Road, you’ll find one of the Peninsula’s new gems behind an old Liberty service station; Red Gum BBQ – a low and slow American-style barbecue joint run by enterprising young couple Melissa and Martin Goffin. What started out as barbecues for friends grew into pop ups at markets and finally, they took the leap, left their jobs and opened Red Gum in an old truck mechanic shed. Big, open and with a rockin’ country music sound track, it is fun for the whole family. Try a range of local brews while sampling smoked specialities such as beef brisket and pulled pork with sides of cornbread and Melissa’s secret slaw recipe. 

Perfectly paired

From Red Hill, head towards Merricks  and you’ll come to the impressive Polperro, where unflappable owner and winemaker Sam Coverdale has created a triple treat: stylish wines, luxurious villas and a stunning bistro. It has outdoor seating for the summer and a cosy fireplace in the winter to enjoy dishes such as grass-fed beef fillet with truffle custard, pea purée, asparagus and beef jus. 

Not far away is a winery and restaurant of renown, Paringa Estate. Chef Adam Beckett presides over a seasonal menu that has earned a chef’s hat for five straight years. His King George whiting with pea crumb, broccoli and half turned potatoes is nearing acclaimed status.

Ten Minutes by Tractor is equally revered in the dining stakes. Chef Stuart Bell’s Fromagarie Menu is perfect if you’re on the go, or settle in for his eight-course degustation if you have all afternoon. 
If you’re keen for food and activity, head towards Shoreham to Montalto. They have quality wines and a recently renovated restaurant that makes use of produce from their vege patch. They also have an amazing sculpture-in-the-vines trail through their vineyards, which is a great way to walk off a decadent lunch. 

Jumping Jackalopes

Without doubt, the most talked about development on the Peninsula in years is  Jackalope Hotel. Built onto the existing structures at Willow Creek Vineyard at Merricks North, it offers super high end accommodation, whose every hallway and open space is a veritable art gallery. It is also home to the mind-blowing Doot Doot Doot restaurant, where chef Martin Webster’s edgy cuisine is wowing diners and has already scored a hat. Its 1200-bottle wine list is simply stupendous. If you’re looking for something a little more relaxed, the same venue hosts Rare Hare cafe, whose wood-fired oven signals more casual but still impressive lunch fare.

Not far from Jackalope is the iconic Merricks General Wine Store, which is a welcoming café, cellar door and an art gallery all in one. Then head south to the hamlet of Flinders. Here, you’ll find a quaint General Store, whose shelves stock gourmet goods and local beers, Georgie & Bass, a café and cookery school, and  Mornington Peninsula Chocolates.

If you’re down this way, follow the  southern coastline past world famous golf courses and the RACV’s spectacular state-of-the-art resort at Cape Schanck (due to be completed in April) and head towards Rosebud to find Blue Mini Eatery & Emporium. Owner and all-round go-getter Tracey Fleming has filled an old bowling alley with eclectic furniture and works by local artists (most of which are on sale) to create a place where you feel instantly at home. Chef John Ward dishes up a menu of fresh, zesty organic fare, while Tracey, who caters events all over the Peninsula, has recently launched Boneo Road Roasters, roasting her own coffee using ethically sourced beans. 

Peninsula Produce

If you’re keen to get more intimate with the amazing food of the region, there are plenty of places where you can sample produce fresh from the source. 
At Benton Rise at Tuerong, Ryan and Deb Sharpley have a perfectly balanced aquaponics system sustainably farming veges and salads alongside rainbow trout. Ryan also grows exotic mushrooms, which he supplies to local restaurants. In addition, every weekend, they host the local farmers’ markets in an old ‘red rattler’ train carriage. Get there early, as once the produce is gone, it’s gone.
And there’s lots more. You can sample an amazing array of bee delights at Pure Peninsula Honey, try fresh goat’s cheese (and pat baby goats) at Main Ridge Dairy, pick berries at Sunny Ridge Strawberry Farm, crunch on fresh apples and down ciders at Mock Red Hill, or taste estate-grown olive oil over lunch in a gorgeous setting at Green Olive at Red Hill. 

The more time you spend on the Mornington Peninsula, the more you appreciate this remarkable region, its glorious produce and the wonderful characters plating up perfection.
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Wine
Coonawarra - the Cult of Consistency
Words by Nick Ryan on 29 Sep 2017
While other Australian regions may have caught up to Coonawarra in the red wine stakes, the commitment of this region’s passionate locals will see it shine well into the future. Coonawarra is an enigma wrapped in a red dirt riddle. We all think we know Coonawarra because it seems like it’s always been there. When you set out on the journey to discover Australian wine, Coonawarra Cabernet Sauvignon is one of the first checkpoints you reach, a foundation stone for building an understanding of what this country can do with its vineyards. But does familiarity breed contempt? And where do the classics sit when the market seems obsessed with the cool cutting edge? Is it enough to continually do a few things well when the consumer has the all the loyalty of a stray cat and the attention span of a goldfish? Is Coonawarra’s glorious past impeding the region’s push into a bright future? A famously close-knit community
Coonawarra is a place where many of the names on the bottles have been there for generations. While its biggest players are corporate, Wynns most notably, the majority of producers are family owned, including names like Balnaves and Bowen Estate. Vineyards are tightly held and rarely change hands and its comparatively small size – just 5,500 ha – ensures the region’s prized fruit is all taken up by those domiciled there and virtually nothing is available for winemakers from other regions to have a crack at making Coonawarra wine seen through outsider eyes. There are obviously benefits in a strong sense of community. “There’s certainly a combined sense of purpose,” says Peter Bissell from Balnaves, a transplanted Kiwi and relative newcomer, having arrived in Coonawarra in 1989. “There’s also a long collective memory of winemaking traditions going back to the 1950s and beyond, that gives us as winemakers a real sense of carrying on something important.” Dan Redman is as Coonawarra as they come, having joined the family business exactly a hundred years after his great-grandfather made his first wine from grapes grown in the famed terra rossa soil. It’s been his nursery, his playground, his backyard, his home. “To me, this community is a source of great friendships and some pretty good times with people I’ve known all my life,” he says. “One of the real strengths of this place is the shared common goal we all have to promote Coonawarra. There’s a united front when any of us talk about the region.” But Redman is not totally blinkered. “It’s probably fair to say that some of the ideas and thinking from the wider wine world might take a bit longer to get here than some other places,” he admits.
That’s pretty understandable in a way. You can’t talk about Coonawarra without considering its physical isolation. It’s halfway between Adelaide and Melbourne, but not on the direct route to either. New blood flows through Coonawarra the way it does through a statue. Kate Goodman is uniquely placed to comment on the region’s uniquely singular focus. She makes wine under her own label in the Yarra Valley and was appointed consultant winemaker at Coonawarra’s Penley Estate a couple of years ago. “The Yarra is vast with a huge diversity of sites, while  Coonawarra is a small area with a tight focus on carefully defined vineyards,” she says. “I’m not saying one is better than the other, I’m just saying the diversity of the Yarra’s landscape lends itself more easily to a diversity of winemaking approaches.” Goodman relishes the opportunities Coonawarra presents, and has quickly learned what makes the place special. “Dear God, the fruit this place can produce is just bloody sensational,” she says. Evolution, not Revolution
​ It would be wrong to see Coonawarra as a wine region trapped in amber. There has been significant change over the last decade, but those changes have been subtle and have taken place within the well-established framework of the classic Coonawarra style. Most notable of these has been the widespread reworking of the region’s vineyards, a sustained exploration of how best to manage its most valuable assets with fruit quality the singular aim. This focus certainly underpins winemaker John Innes’ philosophy and, he says, he spends time in his vineyard, “continually tasting the fruit for optimal flavour and textural ripeness.” The minimal pruning regimes that dominated the region in the 1980s have given way to practices more conducive to vine health and various flirtations with both over and under ripeness have given way to a more comfortable middle ground. A wider clonal mix is now present in the region’s vineyards, offering new angles from which to view the Coonawarra Cabernet picture we think we know so well. Coonawarra has so far been immune from invasion by hipsters who harvest while howling at the moon, so remains untouched by the outer extremes of winemaking methodology, but that doesn’t mean the place is all ‘set and forget’ when it comes to winemaking approach. But it’s all about refinement rather than re-invention. Concrete fermenters are back in vogue, larger format oak and softer fruit handling are helping shape red wines that are more medium-bodied and supple, yet still retain the region’s famed capacity for ageing. Nick Zema explains it best. “We’re always looking to improve, but we never forget what this place has always done best,” he says. “You can go chasing market trends and change up everything you do, but by the time those changes come through to the wine in the bottle, the market’s moved on and you’re just chasing your tail. When you’ve got something that’s considered a classic, you just keep polishing it.” Looking into the future
So where does the famed terra rossa fit in the Australian landscape? The status Coonawarra once had as arguably Australia’s finest red wine region has slipped – more through the competition catching up than Coonawarra going backwards – but the core of what has made this place great remains and, if anything, the future looks brighter now than it has for a long time. Coonawarra’s biggest challenge is making the market fall in love with Cabernet again, and with the ongoing refinement of the style – small, considered steps rather than radical reinvention – the region’s winemakers are set to take that challenge on. Once that’s been done, the story of the region’s outstanding Shiraz, hugely underrated Chardonnay, and affinity with other members of the Bordeaux brotherhood like Cabernet Franc can be told, too. It will always be a place of traditions and tightly woven community ties and may that always be the case. In a world that flutters on the fickle winds of fashion, some certainty, classicism and Cabernet Sauvignon can prove to be welcome respite.
Wine
The Best Tasmanian Wineries & Cellar Doors 2019
Remote, cold and rugged, but above all spectacular, Tasmania’s reputation as a cool climate wine growing region – and holiday destination – par excellence continues to grow, punching well above its weight against those across the Bass Strait. Take a tour of Tasmania’s best wineries and cellar doors for 2019 with this Guide from Wine Selectors. The climate might be cool but Tasmania’s status as a premium destination for food and wine lovers is hotter than ever. While the region saw its first commercial vineyards take root in 1865, these plantings were short-lived, and it wasn’t until the 1970s that winemakers started again in earnest to explore the potential locked up in the soils of old Van Diemen’s Land.  What has become apparent is that, in terms of climate and soil, the region is an ideal place to make cool climate wines really shine. From the sandstone and schist of the Derwent Valley to the peaty alluvial soils of Coal River Valley and the gravelly basalt, clay and limestone of the Tamar, Tasmanian Chardonnay and Pinot Noir in particular have commanded the attention of the world for their heightened flavours, aromas and elegance. Tasmanian Sparkling, too, is now widely regarded as Australia’s finest, evoking favourable comparisons to the qualities of Champagne. Indeed, with some wineries now seeing their third generation take the reins and a host of young guns pushing the envelope, the scene there has become as dynamic and vibrant as the wines that result from such passion and dedication. Read on for Wine Selectors top picks for the best Tasmanian wineries and cellar doors for 2019. Nocton Vineyard Situated in the rolling hills of the upper Coal River Valley, Nocton Vineyard was planted in 1999, making it among the valley’s oldest. Taking its name from an old Scottish term for ‘farmstead where wethered sheep are kept’, it consists of over 34 hectares of ‘winemaking nirvana’, where rich dolerite-based soils and Triassic sandstone subsoil harmonises with pristine air and pure water for sublime growing conditions. Nocton produces a large array of cool climate wines that convey the terroir marvellously, including Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Sparkling. They’re even pioneering cool climate Merlot, which is sure to intrigue – visit their cellar door to discover it for yourself. Just 15 minutes from Hobart Airport, it’s a small venue with a big view, offering tailored and tutored tastings with Estate and Reserve labels poured for you to explore and enjoy. 373 Colebrook Road, Richmond TAS 7025 Thursday to Monday 10am to 4pm Visit the Nocton Vineyard website Pooley Wines Established in 1985, Pooley Wines lays claim to being Tasmania’s first third generation wine family. With two unique sites in the Coal River Valley of Southern Tasmania, Cooinda and Butcher’s Hill, they are also Tasmania’s first and only fully accredited environmentally certified sustainable vineyard, with a host of trophies and medals to their name. Across the two sites viticulturist Matthew Pooley and winemaker Anna Pooley produce superb cool climate specialties that express the region at its best, including Pinot G, Riesling, Chardonnay and Pinot Noir, as well as distinctive takes on Syrah, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot. No visit to Pooley would be complete without taking a tasting flight at the historic Belmont House, an 1830 sandstone stables and coach house and home to their cellar door. Awarded Gourmet Traveller’s Best Small Cellar Door in Southern Tasmania on four occasions (most recently in 2017 and 2018) as well as Best Wine Tasting Experience in Southern Tasmania in 2016 and 2019, it’s an introduction to premium Tasmanian wine not to be missed. Butcher’s Hill Vineyard & Cellar Door 1431 Richmond Rd, Richmond TAS 7025 Open daily 10am to 5pm Visit the Pooley Wines website Grey Sands Grey Sands Vineyard seeks to push the boundaries of what is possible in wine, with a focus on exciting the senses through wines that are “concentrated, complex, intriguing and sometimes confronting”. The westernmost of Tamar Valley vineyards, it was started by Bob and Rita Richter on a grass-covered block of land in 1987. Deciding against irrigation, the resulting vineyard is entirely hard, hand-pruned and close-planted to ensure maximum concentration rather than yield. Minimal intervention is the order of the day, allowing the fruit its own natural expression, and across the seventeen varieties grown at Grey Sands there is extraordinary scope to experience wines unlike anywhere else. Those eager to sample the intrigue of Grey Sands are recommended to visit the Grey Sands ‘cellar door’. Distinct from the typical cellar door, Bob and Rita have established a ‘collector’s garden’, a marvellous arrangement of mature conifers, birches, maples, exotic perennials and more to enjoy a picnic in, with a lovely view towards the Tamar Valley. Or join them on their deck, if the weather allows! A genuine one-of-a-kind winery, and a must-see for visitors to the region. 6 Kerrisons Rd, Glengarry TAS 7275 Open the first whole weekend of the month October to April only, 12pm to 5pm, or by appointment. Visit the Grey Sands website. Devil's Corner Located along the East Coast of Tasmania two hours by car from Hobart, Devil’s Corner embraces its wild remoteness with a passion to produce award-winning cool climate wines of unmistakeable character, from Riesling to Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc and more, as well as an esteemed range of Pinot Noirs. Visitors are encouraged to experience the premium wines alongside the freshly-shucked flavours of Freycinet Peninsula oysters at The Fishers, from the nearby Freycinet Marine Farm, or accompanied by a pizza from Tombolo Café. Undoubtedly however, the highlight – besides wines from the sure hand of winemaker Tom Wallace – is the lookout, an architecturally-designed tower offering unparalleled views of vineyards sweeping down to Moulting Lagoon against the backdrop of the Hazard Ranges. It all makes for a memorable, ultra-modern destination, that’s more than worth the journey.  1 Sherbert Avenue, Apslawn TAS 7190 Open daily from 10am to 5pm Visit the Devil's Corner website Tamar Ridge In the heart of the Tamar Valley and on the banks of the Tamar River you’ll find Tamar Ridge, where passion and science meet in pursuit of premium wines. Primarily specialising in Pinot Noir but with Pinot G, Sauvignon Blanc and Riesling also in the mix, vines are planted on northerly and north-easterly undulating slopes, with soils consisting of clay subsoils and topsoils of quartz sand to clay loam. The differing soil types allows the planting of a variety of Pinot Noir clones, while the strong maritime climate protects the grapes from the extremes, with long sunny days and gentle rains producing the ideal growing conditions for wines of quality and character. At the Cellar Door, visitors can taste their way through an immersive flight of Pinot Noir and other cool climate specialties, and share a bit to eat from local seasonal platters from on-site friends Hubert + Dan on the deck, or down on the lawn, enjoying enchanting views of the pristine Tamar Valley. Sublime. 1A Waldhorn Drive, Rosevears TAS 7277 Open daily from 10am to 5pm Visit the Tamar Ridge website Bay of Fires Home to three premium wines labels in their own right – House of Arras, Bay of Fires and Eddystone Point – Bay of Fires Cellar Door is a wine lover’s dream. Each label focusses on different winemaking philosophies and styles, but one thing is consistent between them – they all reflect the unique Tasmanian terroir of their surroundings. A collaborative venture founded in 1990 by a team of passionate winemakers and viticulturists sharing a common dream, Bay of Fire presents alluring wines that are distinctly Tasmanian – handpicked, and specially selected for quality and character. The cellar door itself, a modern, welcoming venue, offers sweeping views over the vines, the winery and Pipers River, set amidst an ideal backdrop of beautiful, established gardens. Seated Tastings are available, where visitors are taken through the details of Methode Traditionelle Sparkling winemaking for Vintage Arras Sparkling Wines, before delving into Bay of Fires’ still wines and notable award winners. There’s also the 1.5hr Premium Arras Experience, offering a tour of the winery and vineyard before proceeding through a tasting of $500 worth of Arras Sparkling at a private tasting. Hard to beat, for those looking to indulge a little! 40 Baxters Road, Pipers River TAS 7252 Open Thursday to Monday, 10am to 5pm Visit the Bay of Fires website Josef Chromy Recognised for his commitment and contribution to quality food and wine in Tasmania, Josef Chromy OAM has owned and developed some of Tasmania’s leading wineries such as Rochemcombe, Jansz and Heemskerk. Josef Chromy Wines is the culmination of his experience in Tasmania’s Tamar Valley, offering visitors a chance to explore the passion and product of one of our premier winemakers with tastings, vineyard tours, and more. Today, his charming cellar door is set inside the original 1880s homestead, surrounded by stunning manicured gardens, and idyllic views over the surrounding vineyards and lakes. Relax inside by the open log fire, or stop for lunch in the hatted Josef Chromy Restaurant for excellent locally sourced produce matched to the elegant, cool climate Sparkling, aromatic whites, Chardonnay and Pinot Noir on offer. One of the pinnacles of Australian winemaking, and an essential stop on any wine tour of Tasmania. 370 Relbia Rd, Relbia TAS 7258 Open daily from 10am to 5pm Visit the Josef Chromy website Moorilla at Mona No mention of Tasmania’s cellar door scene could pass without listing Moorilla at MONA. The second Tasmanian winery to be established and the longest in continual operation, Moorilla was founded in 1962 and focusses on a small, yet high quality output with estate-grown fruit, small batch winemaking in a gravity-assisted winery. The best way to experience their ultra-premium wines is at MONA’s exquisite cellar door. Take a seat beneath a bona-fide John Olson masterpiece to sample their iconic wines, which emphasise texture and complexity as well as Sparkling styles. There are over 18 to choose from, but if you’re craving something different, selections from their Moo Brew beer label are also available to explore. Or better still, take a guided tour of the Moorilla Vineyard, and taste vino straight from the tank for the ultimate way of immersing yourself in the works of a legendary name in Tasmanian winemaking. 665 Main Road, Berriedale 7011 Open daily 9:30am to 5 pm Visit the Moorilla website Pipers Brook Nestled in the heart of Tasmanian wine country, Pipers Brook Vineyard in the Tamar region has been producing exceptional cool climate wines since 1974. The unique combination of geography, temperate climate and proximity to Bass Strait helps to capture the purity of Tasmania across their range of award-winning wines, with particular emphasis given to Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, Pinot Gris and Riesling along with Sparkling – all estate-grown and bottled for the highest control of the resulting product. Tasmania’s largest family-owned winemaker, its cellar door offers tastings of the Pipers Brook, Kreglinger and Ninth Island ranges for you to sample while learning about the vineyard’s history, with a café offering a seasonal menu of locally-sourced produce that makes for a perfect grazing experience. For those after something a little more exclusive, guests can book the two-bedroom Pipers Brook Villa and wake each morning to stunning views overlooking the estate’s vineyards. Further, if you’re travelling by campervan, make sure to book ahead to secure free onsite RV parking. Beat a path to Pipers Brook, and experience all that one of the original pioneers in Tasmanian wine has to offer. 1216 Pipers Brook Rd, Pipers Brook TAS 7254 Open daily from 10am to 4pm (Summer), Thursday to Monday 11am to 4pm (Winter) Visit the Pipers Brook website More information For more information on visiting Tasmania, be sure to visit the official  Wine Tasmania website . But, if you'd like to sample some of the wineries listed in this guide before you visit, explore our wide selection of  Tasmanian wines and find out more about the wineries listed here in our  Meet the Makers section. What’s more, with the Wine Selectors Regional Release program, you'll experience a different wine region each Release with all wines expertly selected by our Tasting Panel, plus you'll receive comprehensive tasting notes and fascinating insights into each region. Visit our  Regular Deliveries  page to find out more!
Wine
Mornington Peninsula must visits
The Mornington Peninsula is a haven for holiday makers hungry for food, wine and adventure. Here’s our list of the best places to visit in the region.
Crittenden Estate The Crittenden Wine Centre offers a unique way of experiencing wine on the beautiful Mornington Peninsula. Originally the home of the Crittenden family, it has recently been renovated to a stylish, purpose built Wine Centre where knowledgeable staff guide visitors through carefully designed wine flights. Sample Crittenden’s exquisite range of traditional styles and unique alternative varietals with views over the lawn, lake and some of the Peninsula’s oldest vines, and just a short stroll to the Stillwater at Crittenden restaurant. Crittenden Estate is a true family operation with founder and living legend Garry overseeing the vineyard, son Rollo making the wine and daughter Zoe running the marketing. 25 Harrisons Rd, Dromana Open daily 10:30am – 4:30pm crittendenwines.com.au 
Yabby Lake Vineyard Cellar Door + Restaurant The Yabby Lake Vineyard offers a relaxed cellar door, restaurant, and wines of exception. Home of the history-making Block 1 Pinot Noir, winner of the revered Jimmy Watson Trophy, Yabby Lake has built a reputation for wines of great purity and character, uniquely crafted by renowned winemaker Tom Carson. Visitors to the striking cellar door marvel not only at the natural bush setting of the vineyard, but their incredible collection of artworks. Chef Simon West’s seasonal and local fare; often picked fresh from the kitchen garden, is best enjoyed on the outdoor deck, taking in stunning views of the vineyard and beyond. 86 Tuerong Road, Tuerong Open daily, 10am-5pm  (03) 5974 3729   yabbylake.com
Two Blues Sauvignon Blanc 2014
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