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Food

Mark Olive’s crusted kangaroo fillets recipe

Preparation time
Cooking time
Serves
2

We recommend a Tempranillo with a hint of spice to pair with the spicy elements in this dish. Try the Heirloom Vineyards Tempranillo 2015 from the Adelaide Hills – although powerful, it shows elegance and balance with a bold core of red and black fruits, subtle vanillin spice notes, bright acidity, velvety tannins and a long finish.

INGREDIENTS

500g kangaroo fillet (or 500g Scotch fillet)

 

Bush bub mixture

2 tbsp kutjera powder

2 tbsp mountain pepper

2 tbsp dried rivermint

2 tbsp wattleseed

2 tbsp native thyme

2 tbsp sea parsley

 

Sauce

2 dessertspoons butter

3 dessertspoons plain flour

2 cups beef stock

¼ cup of red wine

 ½ tsp mountain pepper

1 cup hibiscus flower

Olive oil

METHOD

1.     Pre-heat oven to 180°C. Mix kutjera powder, mountain pepper, rivermint, wattleseed, native thyme and sea parsley in a bowl to make the herb mix. Spread dry mix onto a plate. Rub kangaroo fillets in a little olive oil and roll in the herb mix. Once completely covered in herbs, lay fillets on
an oiled baking tray and place in oven for
10–15 minutes or until cooked medium rare.

2.     Meanwhile, to make the sauce, melt butter in a saucepan until a nutty brown colour, add flour, stirring vigorously. Slowly add stock, stirring continuously, add wine and mountain pepper, ensuring all lumps are dissolved. Add hibiscus flower and stir through. Remove from heat.

3.     Remove fillets from the oven and rest for a few minutes before slicing into medallions. Place medallions on a plate and drizzle with sauce. Serve with roasted sweet potato mash and salad.

Food
Preparation time
Cooking time
Serves
2

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