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Matching wine with Haigh's chocolate

Individually, wine and chocolate are highly desired treats, but when brought together in a complementary pairing, they can transport your tastebuds to new and exciting places.

This Christmas, we have teamed up with Australia’s most respected chocolate producer to bring you some matches that will have you wishing it was Christmas every month of the year!

And, we're happy to announce an exclusive offer for Wine Selectors members and Selector readers. When you spend $75 or more with Haigh's online and use the code SELECTOR17, you'll receive a free packet of Milk Chocolate Frogs! Find out more below.

Match 1: Shiraz and Haigh’s Dark Chocolate (50%+)

The fruit intensity and medium to full bodied nature of Shiraz make for a rich and mouth-filling combination. The key is starting with a chocolate with over 50% cocoa content and matching the general fruit flavours of the wine to a complementary chocolate flavour.

Our Pick: Primo Estate Shiraz 2016 and Haigh’s 100g Dark Cardamom Tablet

Tasting note: This match is mind blowing! The dark chocolate and the fruit intensity of the McLaren Vale classic from Primo Estate are perfectly weighted together, but what makes this match is when the mocha, plum and pepper flavours of the wine meet the cardamom flavours in the chocolate.  Boom!

Match 2: Cabernet Sauvignon and Haigh’s Dark Chocolate (60%+)

For some reason, Cabernet and dark chocolate always works, and if there was going to be one generic chocolate and wine suggestion, it would be this one. Because Cabernet Sauvignon is generally full-bodied, it needs to be matched with intense flavours, so turning up the cocoa content in the chocolate is key.

Our Pick: Rosabrook Cabernet Sauvignon 2014 and Haigh’s 100g Costa Rica Single Origin Dark Chocolate

Tasting note: This is a decadent, seductive match! This premium Cabernet from Margaret River has plenty of dark berry intensity that matches the chocolate perfectly, but there is an extra sweet raspberry lift to the wine that adds a lovely complement to the bitter flavours of the chocolate.

Match 3: Pinot Noir and Haigh’s Dark Ginger

Pinot Noir is a soft varietal with delicate tannins, so matching it to chocolate can be challenging. But when you get it right, the results are amazing. Less about texture/weight matching, pairing chocolate to Pinot is all about complementary flavours.

Our Pick: De Bortoli Villages Pinot Noir 2016 and Haigh’s Dark Ginger

Tasting note: This is crazy delicious. We stumbled onto this match, as ginger was not on the radar when tasting chocolates for Pinot. The ginger is soft, creamy, sweet and a little spicy and it worked so perfectly with the soft, earthy red fruits in this Pinot. When you think about this match, it makes little sense, but when you taste both together, it makes for a heady, seductive and exotic match.

Match 4: Pinot Gris and Haigh’s Dark Champagne Truffle

Softer and more textural than its crunchier, crispier Grigio cousin, Pinot Gris is a great varietal for chocolate matching with chocolate. Generally low in acid with soft pear, florals and citrus, Gris works well with milk driven and fruit confected chocolates.

Our Pick: Lisa McGuigan Pinot Gris 2015 and Haigh’s Dark Champagne Truffle

Tasting Note: Hard to stop at one! This Haigh’s Dark Champagne Truffle is incredible and will work with a range of white wines, but we found that the soft lemon, pear and granny smith apple fruits are the best combo for the creamy balance between the Champagne cream and the dark chocolate coating. The dusting also adds a nice sweetness to the whole picture. Dangerously delicious.

Match 5: Chardonnay and Haigh’s Dark Orange Slices

Chardonnay, with its nutty, stone fruited complexity is another variety that is hard to be generic about as there are so many nuances to each individual example. Like Pinot Noir, matching becomes less about weight, texture and acidity and more about flavour matching. And, like Pinot Gris, it goes really well with fruit confected and flavoured chocolates.

 Our Pick: Tyrrell's Dry White Chardonnay (1976) and Haighs Dark Orange slices

Tasting Note: Surprisingly, amazingly delicious. This was another out-of-the-blue match that, on paper, shouldn’t work, but very much does. The rich and round white melon and citrus envelop the jaffa-like orange flavours that seem to be extended and lengthened by the wine. The chocolate is dark, but the acidity in the wine lightens it, making a hero of the orange. Lovely combination.

Match 6. Sauv Blanc and Haigh’s White Lemon Truffle

As a zesty, fresh and aromatic variety, Sauvignon Blanc is a good white chocolate option. When it comes to thinking about the wine, however, try to steer away from examples that have loads of grassy characters in preference for examples with citrus dominant characters.

Our Pick: Hungerford Hill Fumé Blanc 2016 and White Lemon Truffle

Tasting Note: There’s no way you will want to share this combination and when we finished tasting, we were looking for more of these special little truffles. This Fumé style Sauv Blanc is citrus driven and textural with little grassy notes that make the natural citrus stand out and was a perfect partner for the lemon spiked cream at the centre of this white chocolate coated treat. This is a definite crowd pleaser.

Special offer for Wine Selectors Members

Spend $75 and use the code SELECTOR17 when you shop with Haigh’s online and you’ll receive a free 140g packet of Milk Chocolate Frogs valued at $12.50! The most iconic of the Haigh’s collection, these frogs are made from premium milk chocolate, which they have been making since the 1930s. Shop at Haigh's online now

See the terms and conditions below.

 

Terms and conditions:

Spend $75 or more at the Haigh's online store before 11.59pm (ACDT) on 13/12/17, enter the eligible promotion code and receive a gift with purchase of 140g Milk Chocolate Frogs valued. * $75 does not include shipping costs. Excludes gift card purchases. Not valid with any other promotion. Not redeemable in-store.http://www.haighschocolates.com.au/chocolates

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Two Blues Sauvignon Blanc 2014
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