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Life

The way to travel in 2016

When cruise ships parade into the harbours of the world and get fanfare normally reserved for royalty, you know that cruising is more than back in fashion – it is the way to travel, today’s ‘jet set’ are now called the ‘cruise crew’.

Three of the key factors for cruising’s amazing resurgence are: the incredible facilities on board today’s modern ships; the wondrously varied on-shore excursions; and phenomenal range of never-before-visited destinations. And things are only going to get better in 2016.

The modern cruise ship is light years from the behemoths that sailed the waterways of years gone by. These days, there are more boutique-style ships catering from 680 - 1,250 guests – consequently, there is a heightened sense of intimacy and a personalised holiday experience. Staff and crew attend to your every whim and remember your individual preferences, there are no lines, going ashore and returning on board takes minutes rather than hours, and life just seems to proceed at a more relaxed pace.

Facilities and entertainment have been described as a floating five-star hotel crossed with the best of a theatre district. Everything from bespoke spa services to English-style libraries, a live pianist, classical string quartet, dynamic vocalists and spectacular headliners. You may also wish to try your luck in an elegant Monte Carlo-style casino. Some cruises even have guest lecturers who might be historians, naturalists or former ambassadors, eager to share insider knowledge.

Guests’ suites are a personal sanctuary with state-of-the-art custom-made furnishings such as plush ‘Tranquility Beds’ with1,000-thread-count linen, lavish marble-infused grand baths (with a private half-bath for guests), showers, luxurious sitting rooms and private teak verandas. Guests are even given their own range of fine Bvlgari bath amenities^.

On-board dining has really stepped up. Celebrity chefs such as Jacques Pépin are providing signature dishes at a range of dining options from French bistro, gourmet Italian, contemporary Asian, French country cuisine, American steakhouses and more and matched with wine lists to rival any Michelin-starred restaurants.

ADVENTURES ASHORE

One of the major highlights of today’s cruising adventures are the amazing off shore activities, and if you are a lover of food + wine, there are some tantalising travels waiting to be had.

Imagine docking in Monte Carlo and then trekking into the countryside to discover the culinary treasures of Provence on a three-night stay at the Château de Berne. Help prepare a traditional Provençal lunch at the château using fresh, seasonal ingredients from the chef’s gardens, learn about local olive oil production and embark on a tasting and tour of a private wine cellar.

Or how about cruising into Rome (Civitavecchia), and then enjoying a three-night stay in Tuscany, including a hands-on cooking class at Villa Pandolfini and a walking tour of Florence’s legendary attractions such as Michelangelo’s David and Ponte Vecchio.

When ships moor at Athens, guests can visit an open-air Greek market and sample locally made cheese and olives then learn how to prepare traditional Greek dishes alongside a top Greek chef. Top that off with wine and ouzo tastings and a food and wine pairing lunch at revered Varoulko, home to Greece’s top-awarded Michelin star chef.

NEW DESTINATIONS, NEW MEMORIES

Of course, with significant advances in cruise ship technology and the smaller boutique style of ships, there are new ports of call becoming available to guests who are seeking new adventures. In 2016, these include such enviable destinations as: La Paz, Mexico; Punta Cana, Dominican Republic; Bandol, France, Porto Santo, Italy, Trieste, Italy; Vlissingen, Netherlands; Helsingborg, Sweden; Catalina Island, California; Gaspé, Quebec; and Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts, just to name a few.

Yes, the world of cruising has come a long way. Luxurious, intimate and engaging, there are exotic culinary adventures and fantastic new discoveries waiting for you to explore.

To find out more details about some of these great cruises visit Oceania Cruises.

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Life
Switzerland: expand your wine horizons
When you think of travelling through Switzerland, images of breath-taking natural scenery and exciting cities full of art and culture no doubt come to mind. But do you also picture stopping at cellar doors to taste world-class wines? If not, you need to expand your Swiss horizons, because this diverse country is home to over 200 types of vines, at least 40 of which are indigenous and have histories dating back to ancient times. What’s more, with only extremely limited quantities made, you’ll only find 1-2% of Swiss wines outside their homeland. There are seven wine regions throughout German-speaking, French-speaking and Italian-speaking Switzerland: Eastern Switzerland ; Geneva ; Lake Geneva Region ; Three Lake Country ; Ticino ; Valais ; and Graubünden . Heritage haven For winelovers who like a dose of history with their tastings, the Lake Geneva region is home to the UNESCO World Heritage Listed Lavaux Vineyard . Dating back to the 11th century when Benedictine and Cistercian monks called the area home, this fascinating site features 14 kilometres of terraced vineyards stretching above Lake Geneva. These incredible vines are still producing wine, with Chasselas, a full, dry and fruity white, the most common. For keen walkers, two routes wend through the region, both taking around two hours and starting at Grandvaux station with one finishing at Cully and the other at Lutry . For a more sedate tour, there are also two miniature train excursions on either the Lavaux Panoramic or the Lavaux Express. In the glass As well as Chasselas, a visit to the Lake Geneva Region will see you sampling unique expressions of Gamay and Pinot Noir. Further south-west in Geneva itself, you’ll also find Chardonnay, Riesling-Sylvaner (Müller-Thurgau), Pinot Blanc, Aligoté via Sauvignon Blanc and Pinot Gris through to Gewürztraminer and Viognier Gamaret, and in the reds, Merlot and Cabernet Franc. For another lakeside wine experience, the Three Lake Country will see you again savouring Chasselas, as well as Pinot Gris, Chardonnay and Pinot Noir. Home to the highest vineyard in Europe at 1,150 metres above sea level, Valais is another region that sees Chasselas at the top of its whites list, while Pinot Noir is the most common red. However, you’ll also find varieties here that few outside the area have heard of, including Petite Arvine, Amigne, Humagne Blanc, Humagne Rouge and Cornalin. Heading further east and south of the Alps is the Italian-speaking Ticino region, where 90 per cent of the wine produced is Merlot. They even make a white called Merlot Bianco. Less common red varieties include Bondola, Pinot Noir, Cabernet Sauvignon and Cabernet Franc and in the whites, Chardonnay, Chasselas, Sauvignon and Semillon. “Great things come in small packages” is the motto of German-speaking Switzerland where Pinot Noir and Riesling-Silvaner are the most common varieties. Local specialties include Räuschling and Completer, along with Chardonnay, Pinot Gris and Sauvignon Blanc.
Wine
Australia's emerging wine regions: making their presence felt!
This Aussie Wine Month we're exploring some of the emerging wine regions across Australia. While they're not as well-known as some of the big guns, Orange, Canberra, Geographe and the Granite Belt are all producing fantastic quality wines. Plus, discover Riverland's new look and new take on alternative varietals.   Orange Located in the central west of NSW, about 280kms west of Sydney, the cool climate region of Orange is producing exceptional Sauvignon Blanc , Chardonnay , Merlot and Pinot Noir , and has winemakers from across the state vying for its premium fruit. Sitting at almost 900m above sea level and with some vineyards climbing to 1100m, Orange is the highest wine region in Australia. It's this altitude coupled with the volcanic soils of Mount Canobolas that make its Sauvignon Blanc so amazing. Of the almost 40 wine producers in the region, nearly all make a Sauvignon Blanc and all have their own style - fresh and fruity, subtle yet complex, pure and minerally, barrel fermented and rich. The region's most common expression of Sauv Blanc is the fresh, intense fruit-driven style. Less herbal, it has a tropical punch with passionfruit being a key flavour. It tends to be a bit fuller with more palate weight, but is still lively. Chardonnay also thrives in Orange's cool climate as does Pinot Noir and Shiraz . The best Pinots are perfumed, earthy and very inviting and that's what you get in Orange - seductive and charming in their youth, they don't need lengthy cellaring. Shiraz performs well across the different elevations - the richer styles come from the lower elevations, while those from higher vineyards are medium-bodied and spicy. Alternative varieties also have a huge future in the region. Look for Sangiovese, Barbera, Vermentino , Grüner Veltliner, Arneis, Zinfandel, Tempranillo , and Barbera. Browse our range of Orange wines    Canberra Although grape growing and winemaking in the Canberra district dates back to the 1840s, production went into a dramatic decline, and it wasn't until the 1970s and 1980s that the industry was rekindled in the region. Over the last 20 years, there has been growing interest in the region, and the three sub-regions of Bungendore/Lake George, Hall and Murrumbateman are now home to around 110 vineyards with approximately 450 hectares under vine. The Canberra region experiences a strongly continental climate with a high diurnal temperature range (cold nights and hot summer days) and generally a cool harvest season. Some vineyards are planted on near-alpine slopes with cool autumns contributing to elegant cool-climate Shiraz , Pinot Noir , Cabernet , and Riesling , while those on the lower slopes create full-flavoured Chardonnay and Shiraz. A number of alternative varietals are also on the increase with small plantings of Sangiovese , Tempranillo , Malbec, Marsanne, Roussanne, Graciano and Grüner Veltliner producing fantastic quality wines. Browse our range of Canberra wines   Granite Belt Three hours south-west of Brisbane on the southern Darling Downs, the Granite Belt is situated around Queensland's apple capital, Stanthorpe. Surprisingly, its first plantings of grapes date back to 1820 and precedes Victorian and South Australian regions by 15-plus years. While Queensland is usually thought of as having a hot or tropical climate, the Granite Belt has some of Australia's highest altitude vineyards and it's the associated cool climate that is the perfect setting for the region's fine boned, European-style wines. Think medium-bodied, savoury reds with fine tannins and pronounced acidity. In the whites, expect lighter, citrus driven styles with elegant layers and fine acid lines. Adding to the Granite Belt's wine identity is the fact it excels in alternative styles. While you'll certainly find mainstream varieties like Shiraz, Cabernet and Chardonnay, the real excitement comes from discoveries like Fiano, Vermentino, Chenin Blanc, Savagnin, Barbera, Graciano, Durif, Nebbiolo and Tannat. Browse our range of Granite Belt wines here   Geographe Located just two hours south of Perth, this historic region gets its name from French explorer Nicholas Baudin whose boat was called Le Geographe. He chanced upon the area in 1802 and was no doubt impressed by the stunning coastline and rolling hills surrounding. One of Australia's most geographically diverse regions, today Geographe is also one of WA's most exciting emerging regions and home to many diverse styles of wines and boutique wineries creating wines with regional distinction. There are four districts in the region: Harvey, Donnybrook, Capel and Ferguson all with their own unique terroir and topography, but it is the cooling afternoon sea breezes from Geographe Bay that ensure a long stable growing season and that help create the local style of wine. Look for stunning Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Shiraz, Malbec, Sauvignon Blanc and Chardonnay, plus alternatives Arneis, Chenin Blanc, Tempranillo and Nebbiolo. Browse our range of Geographe wines   Riverland A warm climate region, Riverland is located east of the South Australia's Barossa Valley and extends for 330 km along the Murray River from Paringa to Blanchetown. Producing up to 30% of Australia's annual crush, it's the largest wine producing region in Australia and home to 1,000 wine grape growers representing 20,600 hectares of vines. Once known for growing fruit for large scale production, Riverland is now being recognised for turning its talents to exciting and premium alternative varieties like Petit Verdot, Montepulciano, Nero d'Avola, Tempranillo, Fiano, Arneis and Vermentino. Fiano particularly, is giving local winemakers a chance to show they can make exciting, cutting-edge wines. Browse our range of Riverland wines  
Life
Explore South African Wine Country
South Africa is one of the hottest travel destinations on earth – discover its allure with Luxury Wine Trails Did you know the origins of South Africa’s Cape Town & Cape Winelands date back to the 17th century? No? Well you’re not alone, as it remains an undiscovered gem for many. A melting-pot of vibrant cultures blended with world-class wine and food, the region offers breath-taking scenery, luxurious hotels, amazing golf courses, warm weather and welcoming locals. That’s what drew Sydney-sider Michael Nash to the region over 10 years ago. With each trip, his eyes opened to the unique potential of creating hand-crafted and immersive journeys for adventurers seeking true ‘bucket-list’ experiences, combining outstanding vineyards, wine, food and luxury accommodation, with spectacular scenery, local art, culture, architecture, flora and fauna. And so Luxury Wine Trails was born! TRAVEL WITHOUT COMPROMISE
From the moment you arrive, everything is included with Luxury Wine Trails. 5-star hotels in the city and vines, fine dining, premium paired wines, exclusive vineyard tastings, expert local guides, luxury transport and more. You’ll explore the stunning Cape coast, heritage listed wild-flower kingdom and world famous Kirstenbosch Botanical Gardens. On your rest day, enjoy golf at a championship course in the vines or a stunning spa treatment. EXPERIENCES MONEY CAN’T BUY
What sets Luxury Wine Trails even further apart is the unprecedented access to people and places you simply can’t book. In intimate groups of just 20, enjoy exclusive masterclasses with South Africa’s leading wine writer and show judge, Michael Fridjhon, and the country’s most celebrated food + wine author, Katinka van Niekerk. Enjoy an invitation-only dinner with four of the region’s leading winemakers at a spectacular vineyard, a masterclass with Riedel, chats with your executive chefs,  and high tea at the historic Belmond Mount Nelson hotel in Cape Town. If you’re keen to explore South Africa’s wine regions, enjoy sumptuous food and experience an amazing culture, this is the tour for you. You can even add a 3 or 4 day luxury safari pre/post tour! + Special offer for Wine Selectors Members and Selector readers With dates departing Cape Town in Jan, Feb, April and May 2018, book now and quote #LWT.Selector to save $AUD1600 per couple! Plus, receive six premium South African wines valued at over $250 (limited to one pack per booking), when you book a 1st half 2018 tour by Dec 15, 2017. Visit luxurywinetrails.com.au or  call 1 800 087 245 for more details.
Two Blues Sauvignon Blanc 2014
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