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Rosé revealed – how is it made?

The time is ripe for Rosé – spring afternoons and evenings are perfect for relishing the refreshing, savoury characters of fabulous Australian drops. But, as you sit back and sip its deliciousness, do you ever wonder exactly how Rosé is made?

Up until a few years ago, Australian winemakers made Rosé as an afterthought, says Tasting Panellist Adam Walls. “Whereas now, the wines are being made deliberately, with designated parcels of fruit that have been picked specifically to be turned into Rosé.” 

As Hunter Valley winemaker Mike De Iuliis explains, “There are two distinct keys to making quality Rosé. First is the variety that is being used, and second is timing of harvest.”

There are many different styles of wine and as Mike describes, “Rosé is quite a personalised wine and at De Iuliis, we are looking to produce a style that is bright, fresh and vibrant. We also try to produce a drier, more savoury style that is built around texture and acidity rather than sugar and fruit.” 

So, how is Rosé made?

Rose wine infographic on how it is made

The Maceration Method

Just like red wine, Rosés pick up their colour from the skin of red wine grapes. The winemaker can determine the depth of colour in the wine by deciding how long to leave the juice in contact with the skins, typically anywhere from 2 to 24 hours – the shorter the time, the lighter the colour.

The amount of time a winemaker leaves the juice in contact with the skins, Hunter Valley winemaker Mike De Iuliis explains: 

“It depends on the variety you're using. With our special release Rosé, which is made from Grenache, the fruit is harvested by machine and then transported to the Hunter Valley (from the Hilltops). This time on skin is about long enough (approx. 8-12 hours), to pick up the colour that we like and also the flavour profile that we are looking for.”

- Mike De Iuliis, De Iuliis Wines - Hunter Valley

There are different techniques used for this process, including the maceration method, which allows the crushed skins of the red wine grapes to ‘steep’, or macerate, in the juice for a short period of time, before the skins are removed and the entire tank is finished into a Rosé wine. 

The Saignée Method

Another method is called the Saignée (‘san-yay’), or the ‘bleed’ method. This involves ‘bleeding off’ a portion of the juice – while the remaining goes on to make red wine – into a separate vat to finish fermentation. This technique can result in some really lovely examples. Saignée expert Andrew Margan is a strong proponant of this style:

When making rose using this method we soak the unfermented grape juice on its skins for about 48 hours and allow the juice to soak some colour and flavour out of the skins before we run just 10 % of that juice off into another tank and add yeast to ferment it like a white wine. Cold fermentation ensures that the fruit flavours and aromas are conserved in the finished wine.The key is to make sure you drain off the juice at the right time. Because we have much softer tannins here in the Hunter and we obtain ripeness of flavour at lower alcohols we can make a saignee style rose that does not require any residual sugar and has enough richness of flavour without being too high in alcohol to make a dry rich Rosé

- Andrew Margan, Margan Wines

Blending:

Another way to make Rosé is by mixing white and red wine together, although, this rather crude method is generally frowned upon and doesn’t usually make for a very nice tasting wine. 

Colour and Characters:

The colour of Rosé can range from the lightest shades of pale onion skin pink to salmon, coral, hot pink, and ruby red; generally speaking, the darker the colour, the more intense and sweeter the wine. Primary fragrances and flavours of Rosé depend on the type of grape, or grapes, used, but will typically sit along the spectrum of red fruits and florals, melons and zesty citrus. Sometimes, you’ll find pleasant green characters, like rhubarb or strawberries with their leafy green tops still on. 

What varieties are used to make Rosé?

Rosé can be made from just about any red wine grape variety there is. In Australia, the more common varietals used to make Rosé include ShirazPinot Noir, and Grenache. But also, Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon. In Provence, the historical home of Rosé, winemakers will blend grape varieties, such as Cinsault, Mourvédre, Syrah (Shiraz), and Carignan, to create gorgeous examples of this pale pink wine.

Now you know how it’s made, it’s time to drink to Rosé’s pink perfection and fill your spring with some delicious drops.

 

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Chardonnay Members Tasting
Words by Patrick Haddock on 13 Nov 2017
Australian Chardonnay has undergone quite a transformation since the days of ‘sunshine in a bottle’, coming of age as a world-beating white. I partly blame Selector . For cementing my love affair with Chardonnay , I mean. Seven years ago, Selector hosted the most ambitious Chardonnay tasting ever staged in Australia. In attendance were some luminaries of the industry, including Iain Riggs and Tyson Stelzer and it was my first tasting en masse with a variety I’ve come to adore. It ignited a solid relationship with the many styles and regions in this vast land. Yet weirdly, my affair with Australian Chardonnay had commenced a decade or more before. It was the golden era for Chardonnay and I remember dinner tables being awash with names like Oxford Landing, Koonunga Hill and Rosemount as we slated our thirsts on cheap two-for-one deals in the bottle shops of London. It personified a new taste on the UK wine scene that found an unquenchable thirst. Looking back, it was risible that such overly fruity and highly oaked wines could have made such a splash, but Australia saw the opportunity and grabbed it. The New World invasion of the early 90s was pulled off with aplomb. As the saying went: “No wood? No good.” A Sunny Impression
The other insidious ruse that Australia employed was to label their wines with the variety – virtually unheard of in the Old World and it was a genius bit of marketing. When the English were drinking Burgundy, they may not have known it was actually Chardonnay. A classic example was my mum saying she hated Chardonnay, but loved Pouilly Fuisse – a small sub-region of Burgundy that makes Chardonnay. However, the French are far too proud to put the variety on their bottles, causing mass consumer confusion. UK consumers were also buying into the image of Aussie life, summed up by the phrase for Australian Chardonnay, “sunshine in a bottle.” The label was seen as just as important as what was inside. Australia made wines that were soft and easy to drink with obvious flavours. Australia proudly screamed Chardonnay on the label, most often from South East Australia. We had visions of beaches and sun-tanned sheilas picking the grapes; never mind that it actually came from a mass irrigated desert wasteland somewhere near the NSW border and was machine harvested before being relegated to industrial amounts of new oak or worse still, flavoured with oak chips. A Refining Moment
Yet for all the joy of a tidal wave of wood that Chardonnay brought, it all imploded. The bargain bins remained full as the obvious flavour hit of the New World came crashing down and the wines became increasingly like caricatures of Chardonnay. We had some soul searching to do. Was Australia happy to stand on the world stage offering nothing but bargain basement wines, or did we want to be taken seriously? A decade later, in the middle of the noughties, a seismic shift began. A new wave of Chardonnay producers were re-inventing the wheel, spearheaded by intelligent winemakers in regions like the Yarra Valley , Tasmania and Margaret River . Chardonnay went from being Dolly Parton (buxom and generous) to Kate Moss (skeletal and lithe), although the best example of Chardonnay for mine is the Cindy Crawford – curvy and ample, but still chiselled and toned. Earlier picking, less oak, natural acid and throwing away the process of malolactic fermentation saw the rulebook re-written. It was time for Chardonnay to grow up and make an impression. Then in 2010, one of the UK’s most outspoken commentators, the erudite Andrew Jefford, opined that Australian Chardonnay can “compete effortlessly with the greatest wines of Burgundy.” He went on to exclaim: “There is no variety that responds better to craft than Chardonnay, and the greatest Australian examples are perfect syntheses of grape, place and intellectual understanding.” What a renaissance occurred. And the world took notice. Since then, any Chardonnay producer worth their salt has worked hard to improve the breed. Contemporary Style
Which brings us to today and as Hunter Valley winemaker and Chardonnay craftsman, Usher Tinkler describes, “Australian Chardonnay is in the best shape ever.” While winemakers and wine critics are well aware of Chardonnay’s contemporary appeal, has the everyday wine-lover caught on? To find out, we invited some Wine Selectors members and guests along to The Dolphin Hotel in Sydney for a dinner matched with a selection of modern Australian Chardonnays. As I chatted with the guests before the wines started flowing, a common theme arose. The reputation of Chardonnay was stuck in the past. As member Kirsty Bryant described:

“Although the Chardonnays that come in my regular selections have always been nice, I still have a mental association where drinking Chardonnay equals drinking a tree.”

- Krysty Bryant, Wine Selectors Member
Guest, Lisa Currie was of a similar mind, saying, “Chardonnay has always been a variety that means an intense oakey, woody flavour, very buttery and heavy, which just isn’t to my taste.” To help bring our doubting guests around to the charm of Chardonnay, we were fortunate to be joined by Usher, who offered some insights and, as luck would have it, his Reserve Chardonnay 2016 – a unanimous crowd favourite. To explain why Usher personally loves Chardonnay, he offered a succinct analogy:

“If Shiraz and Cabernet are like Kings, then Chardonnay is the Queen – like the chess piece, it can do anything from anywhere! It’s the most interesting variety to make and to drink.”

- Usher Tinkler, Hunter Valley Winemaker
It’s also extremely food friendly, depending on the style – Chardonnay can be versatile and extremely easy to pair with a variety of dishes. You only need to think of crystalline Chablis with oysters, a generously oaked Chardonnay with roast pork or chicken, and something in between for scallops and lobster. Don’t forget that Chardonnay is also excellent with soft cheeses. It certainly added an extra dimension to the tasting having food to accompany the wines. This was particularly true of the second bracket, which all had high levels of acidity, and so illustrated how food can really enhance the wine experience. The fusilli with crab, chilli and herbs helped soften the acidity, making for a harmonious matching. So Many Regions to Love It
Chardonnay is planted in virtually every region in Australia, but the ones that have excelled include Margaret River, Yarra Valley, Hunter Valley, Tasmania and the Adelaide Hills. Bubbling under for quality there’s Orange, Mudgee and Tumbarumba, Mornington Peninsula and Macedon Ranges, Beechworth and Coonawarra. On the night, it was the Hunter Valley and the Adelaide Hills that got the most nods with support also going to Mudgee, Coonawarra and Margaret River. The styles were varying among the different regions, but showed clearly the development of Chardonnay and the multitude of ways that winemakers are manipulating the variety in their favour to create the best expressions. And for those dubious guests, the tasting certainly had the desired effect. As Lisa described, “I found the flavour nuances really interesting, most were very balanced, yet complex.” Kirsty agreed, saying, “I was delighted to find that when it’s a good Chardonnay, even the more wooded ones don’t taste like trees. They have very inviting flavours.” For member, Robert Vukasinovic, who was already a fan, he found his “love for Chardonnay has grown stronger after the tasting because there are so many new styles available compared to the past bias towards heavily oaked styles.” What it certainly showed is there’s no doubting we’ve come of age and the new dawn of Australian Chardonnay has emerged victorious.
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Seven New Wines to Explore this Spring
Celebrate the arrival of spring and explore a whole new world of wine with some exciting alternative varietals guaranteed to become firm new favourites. To take the guess work out of what you think you might or might not enjoy, the Tasting Pane l has selected seven favourite main-stream varietals our Members love and suggested a new alternative varietal that is similar. Chardonnay + Roussanne, Sauvignon Blanc + Vermentino, Pinot G + Arneis, Riesling + Gruner Veltliner, Shiraz + Montepulciano, Cabernet Sauvignon + Durif, and Pinot Noir + Nero d’Avola. Favourites you love + new finds to enjoy 1. Roussanne "Wonderfully aromatic, Roussanne delivers all the stonefruit and honeysuckle characters that Chardonnay drinkers can’t resist,” says Tasting Panellist, Dave Mavor . Roussanne hails from the Northern Rhône and its name comes from ‘roux’, French for ‘russet’, which describes the reddish-gold colour of its skin when ripe. It thrives in moderate to warm climates such as Barossa Valley , McLaren Vale and Rutherglen . Its rich texture makes it ideal with creamy sauces – roasted poultry, shellfish with cream sauce, pork dishes. Discover the delights of Roussanne here. 2. Vermentino  “ Sauvignon Blanc fans will love how Vermentino is just as mouth-watering and full of citrus flavours,” says Tasting Panellist, Nicole Gow . Find out more about the variety with Nicole's Vermentino guide here . Most famously grown on the Italian island of Sardinia, it makes perfect sense that Vermentino suits Australia’s warm climate, especially that of McLaren Vale . Styles range from light and fresh to rich and textural. It thrives in cool to warm climates giving different characteristics. Grown increasingly in Australia, most notably in King Valley , McLaren Vale and the Hunter Valley . Bright acidity and textural elements make it idea with a range of simply-prepared foods – grilled white fish, calamari, and tomato based sauces. Experience the refreshing citrus flavours of Vermentino here. 3. Arneis “Crisp, floral and packed full of pear with a lovely texture, like Pinot G , Arneis is a fabulously food-friendly white,” says Tasting Panellist, Keith Tulloch . Originating in Italy, Arneis is a white varietal winemakers often blend with Nebbiolo to add a touch of sweetness and perfume. Here in Australia, it’s living up to its reputation as being a little difficult to grow – an emerging hit. It thrives on cool to moderate climates such as Adelaide Hills , King Valley and Mornington Peninsula . A crisp yet generous and versatile variety – pair it with salads, egg-based dishes, antipasto. Discover the food-friendly Arneis here. 4. Gruner Veltliner “ Gruner Veltliner is very similar to Riesling , but with just a little more richness and a distinctive peppery aroma that I know you’ll adore," says Tasting Panellist, Trent Mannell . Gruener Veltliner is the most famous and widely planted white variety in Austria. Here in Australia it’s gaining a great following due to passion of producers including Tomich Wines, Cape Barren and Geoff Hardy . It thrives in cool climates such as Adelaide Hills . An elegant, complex and savoury variety, ideally suited to aromatic dishes, spicy vegetables, tofu and Japanese. Venture into the world of Gruner Veltliner here. 5. Montepulciano “Montepulciano’s (‘Monte’s’) appeal lies in its beautifully generous fruit, including red plum, sour cherry and boysenberry, and moderate acidity, so I reckon if you love Australian Shiraz, you’ll love Monte, too," says Tasting Panellist, Adam Walls. In true Aussie style, Montepulciano has been shortened to ‘Monte’. The Italian varietal has had success in Australia’s warmer and cooler climates, most likely because it’s a relatively late ripening variety. Just like Shiraz, it’s hardy, disease-resistant and can handle the heat and cold. Great examples of Monte can be found in Adelaide Hills, Barossa Valley and Riverland. The general fruit intensity and richness of Monte mean that it’s a natural match to an array of rich and intensely flavoured dishes. Some complementary pairings include mushroom ragu with rag pasta, braised beef shin and pepperoni pizza. Explore this increasingly popular varietal here. 6. Durif “ Durif and Cabernet are similarly luxurious with dark cherry, chocolate and hints of anise,” says Tasting Panellist, Dave Mavor . Hailing from the south of France, Durif is now most prolific in Australia and California. It has great ageing potential and blends beautifully with Shiraz. It thrives in hot climates such as Rutherglen, Barossa Valley and Riverland . Pair it with richer, high fat foods to balance the robust tannins – rich braised meats, casserole and meaty pasta. Delve into the delicious world of Durif here. 7. Nero d’Avola “With its spicy fruits and supple savoury texture, Nero d’Avola will sweep you off your feet,” says Tasting Panellist, Adam Walls . Find out more about the variety in Adam's video here Translating as ‘black grape of Avola’, Nero d’Avola hails from the Italian town for which it’s named. It didn’t arrive in Australia until 1998 and while it’s not widely known, it’s proving to be a delicious drink. It thrives in moderate to warm climates such as Barossa Valley, McLaren Vale, Riverland, Heathcote and Murray Darling. Pair it with rich dishes that will be balanced by the tannins and high acidity – osso bucco, spicy Indian and game meat. Make a Nero d’Avola discovery here. Expand your cellar with all of these great new finds, and open up a whole new world of food and wine matching possibilities.
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Pinot Gris vs Grigio: What’s the difference?
There is Pinot Gris and then there is Pinot Grigio, but what if any, are the differences? We chat with Adam Walls and Dave Mavor from our Tasting Panel, plus some super-passionate Pinot G winemakers to set the record straight. “Pinot G is hugely popular with Australian wine-lovers, but there’s still so much confusion surrounding this fresh and fashionable white,” says Adam Walls, Tasting Panellist, Wine Show Judge, Wine Educator and 2019 Len Evans Tutorial Dux. “To put it simply, they are both made from the same grape variety, but are crafted to produce two different styles.” “The grape variety is a member of the Pinot Noir family and has two different names thanks to the two countries in which it is most commonly grown: France and Italy,” explains Adam. “Across the two styles, the common aroma and flavour descriptors include apple, pear, strawberry, honey, brioche and nuts.” Just to add to the confusion, across the wine world it also has several names: in Germany the grape is known as Grauburgunder, in the Loire and Switzerland, it’s called Malvoisie, it’s known as Pinot Beurot in Burgundy and in Hungary, it’s called Szurkebarát which means grey monk. PIÙ LEGGERO PINOT GRIGIO The word Grigio is the Italian for "grey" and has made a name for being a light, crisp wine ideal for early drinking and is most famously known in the regions of Veneto and Friuli. Bonjour! is it gris you’re looking for? Gris is French for "grey" and in France it finds its home in the Alsace region. French Pinot Gris is generally known for being a rich, full-bodied white with a smooth, silky texture. AUSSIE PINOT G GOODESS The variety was first introduced to the Hunter Valley with the James Busby collection of 1832, however, it wasn't until the 1990s that it started to emerge. Thanks to winemaking couple Kathleen Quealy and Kevin McCarthy, Pinot G is now one of Australia’s most popular white varietals. Kathleen and Kevin started their vineyard in Victoria’s Mornington Peninsula in 1998 and set about planting a range of varietals suited to the climate, including Pinot Gris. They released their first commercial Pinot Gris in 1933, and have huge success since, and are now seen as setting the benchmark for Australian interpretations. Their son Tom, a winemaker at Quealy wines, has inherited his parents' passion for Pinot G and has completed vintages in the homes of both the Gris and Grigio styles. "I’ve worked vintages at Domain Paul Blanck in Alsace, where Pinot Gris is one of four premium varieties", he explains. "Their vineyards define the quality and the personality of each of their wines. They revel in the power and voluptuousness of these wines, from bone dry with the generous dollop of extract in the middle palate, to off dry with enough flavour and structure to make the wine balanced and suitable with a main course. They’re able to make and market their even richer sweeter late harvest styles. The wines are beautiful to drink, slightly drying out with a few years bottle age, and suit their dishes of duck and pork. "I have also worked and spent time in Friuli. Their lighter soils and their food culture define their Pinot Grigio style: crunchy pear, dry and textured. The winemaking art of blending abounds. There are field blends and regional blends of many white varieties, with Pinot Grigio a central component." AUSSIE WINE REGIONS PINOT G LOVES According to Wine Australia “While it’s nowhere near the heady heights of Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot G, is growing rapidly with plantings of the grape outstripping Viognier, Verdelho, Muscat, Colombard and Riesling, and it’s now nipping at the heels of Semillon.” In Australia, the cool climate regions of Mornington Peninsula, Tasmania, Adelaide Hills, Orange, King Valley and Great Southern have the ideal conditions to produce high quality fruit and that allow winemakers to experiment with styles. MORNINGTON PENINSULA Tom Quealy says the  Mornington Peninsula 's superior suitability for Pinot G is down to a combination of regional factors. "It's the climate - cool, maritime, Indian summers. It's the cloud cover and sea breezes. The Red Hill and Main Ridge flank creates intimate valleys of rich volcanic soils that hold onto the rainfall. The dryland farming keeps each berry and bunch tiny and concentrated. Then there's a winemaking fraternity reared on  Pinot Noir  and now applying these skills to their love child Pinot Gris."  ADELAIDE HILLS Another standout Aussie Pinot G producer is  Wicks Estate  in the  Adelaide Hills , where, Tim Wicks, explains, "The cool evenings promote great acid retention in the fruit, along with a gradual flavour ripeness without excess phenolic development. This allows the variety to retain a charming aromatic lift which combines beautifully with the subtle textural elements." At Wicks Estate, they make a Gris rather than a Grigio, but as Tim describes, it may be akin to the Gris style, but it maintains a hint of the Grigio aromatics and racier acid lines. This is reflective of the Gris-Grigio overlap that Tim sees as common in Australia. "We have countless fantastic wines that tend towards either the richer Gris characters or lighter aromatic Grigio characteristics. There are also wines that exhibit traits of both, take our  Wicks Estate Pinot Gris , for example. We like the sharpened focus and aromatic style of the Grigio, but tend to lean towards the textural qualities of Gris on the palate. The styles have their own identity; however, we have diverse terroir and climate in Australia that can lend itself to a hybrid style." Celebrated Adelaide Hills winemaker Tim Knappstein sources fruit from a single vineyard near Lenswood to craft his Riposte The Stilletto Pinot Gris. “For the 2018 around 25% of the free run juice was fermented in French oak hogsheads and barriques of which 10% were new,” explains Dave Mavor, Tasting Panellist, Winemaker and Wine Show Judge. “It was then blended with the fresh tank fermented portions to provide a balance of fruit and complexity resulting in a wine showing a juicy pear and lemon fruit core, bright and fresh acidity, lovely texture and mouth-watering persistence.” KING VALLEY The landscape of Victoria’s King Valley is extremely varied, from the flats of the Oxley Plains to the heights of the Whitlands Plateau, one of the highest vineyard areas in Australia. It’s a melting pot for Mediterranean varieties due to its climatic similarity to Italy and Spain making it a top location to grow premium Pinot G. “What makes our Pinot Grigio style so distinctive is the decision to harvest the fruit early to achieve light floral fruit flavours with good natural acidity. The juice is handled oxidatively to naturally remove any colour and unwanted tannins prior to settling and racking, then fermented cool in stainless steel to preserve fruit flavours followed by a short maturation period on lees during autumn and winter, before bottling in the spring,” explains Chrismont winemaker Warren Proft. Chrismont also produces Pinot Gris as a partner to their Italian-inspired La Zona Pinot Grigio – the end result presents a compelling case for the diversity of the variety and its suitability to the King Valley region. With their Italian family heritage, it’s a no brainer that Alfredo and Katrina Pizzini produce excellent Pinot Grigio from their King Valley vineyards. Made by their winemaker son, Joel Pizzini, their 2017 Pinot Grigio is a pure expression of the style, It’s dry and savoury with a fresh line of acidity driving the white and yellow fruit core through to the chalky finish. ORANGE Located in the New South Wales Central Ranges, the Orange wine region has the perfect cool climate and soil types to produce outstanding Pinot G expressions. It’s geographical indicator starts at 600 metres and has vineyards at elevations right through the scale to 1200 metres above sea level; Orange is the highest wine region in Australia and ranks among some of the highest in the world. Winemakers have the luxury of cool weather to retain delicate flavours and enough sunlight to achieve ripening. “The Trophy and 2 x Gold medal-winning Angullong Pinot Grigio 2019 and Gold medal-winning Printhie Mountain Range Pinot Gris 2018 are both fantastic examples coming out of the Orange region,” say Adam Walls, Tasting Panellist, Wine Show Judge, Wine Educator and 2019 Len Evans Tutorial Dux. “Simply put, the Printhie is one of the best we’ve tasted in 2019 – rich and full-bodied, with concentrated fruit flavours, grapefruit-like acidity, supple mouthfeel and a creamy finish in a solid Gris style. More proof, if it was needed, of the Orange region’s ability to excite with the sheer quality of wines that it’s producing,” Adam says. “Certain to take out more awards, the Angullong Pinot Grigio delivers soft, savoury yellow fruits with subtle herbaceous notes, pear, nectarine, ginger and dried herb and a juicy acid finish.” GREAT SOUTHERN The Great Southern region of Western Australia is a relatively new playground for Pinot G producers. It’s cool-climate wines are carefully crafted against a striking backdrop of some of the world’s most diverse National Heritage landscapes by wineries including West Cape Howe, Ludic Wines, Howard Park Wines and more. “Our 2019 Pinot Grigio was been sourced from three vineyards – Mount Barker, Frankland and Margaret River,” explains Gavin Berry, West Cape Howe Managing Director and senior winemaker. “The later 2019 season meant the fruit ripened in generally cooler conditions, preserving the Pinot Grigio’s delicate fruit characters.” “Meanwhile, our West Cape Howe Pinot Gris 2019 from Great Southern features crunchy white fruit with hints of jasmine and oyster shell. It’s elegant yet intensely flavoursome, true to the Gris style with a rich, textural and velvety finish.” TASMANIA Tasmania’s naturally elegant wines are made from grapes grown in climates similar to those of the famous European wines – with mild summers and long autumn days that ripen the grapes providing elegance and intensity of flavour. While its wine history dates back as far as 1823, it wasn’t until the early 1970s that the industry began to flourish and it now produces elegant cool climate including Pinot Gris.  Relbia Estate sources it’s fruit from the southern end of the Tamar Valley producing elegant cool climate wines showing crisp acidity, complexity and intensity. Winemaker Ockie Myburgh describes their Pinot Grigio 2017 – “Our Pinot Grigio is harvested ripe to capture full varietal character. The grapes are gently destemmed without crushing the berries, juice is pressed directly to a stainless-steel tank. Fermentation is carried out on light solids to provide a fuller mouth feel with texture and to balance the crisp acidity.”  Another winemaker making a mark with their Pinot G is René Bezemer who sourced fruit from two of Ninth Island’s vineyards in Tasmania, Pipers Brook and Tamar Valley to create their 2016 Pinot Grigio. It’s deliciously textural and rich with good fruit-depth, balanced by lovely crisp acidity through to the long, complex finish. TAKE THE TASTE TEST Whether you choose a  richer Gris or a zestier Grigio , or a mix of both, you can’t go wrong with Pinot G. Explore our diverse range now to discover your new favourites.
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