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Wine

South Australian Wine Regions

Explore the South Australia regions that are keeping Australia on the world wine stage.

Adelaide Hills

Adelaide Hills’ cool climate means vibrant whites are the lifeblood of the region with punchy expressions of Sauvignon Blanc and fine restrained Chardonnay being the two traditional white varietals. However, with its unique topography that creates several microclimates, the region is also perfect for Pinot Gris and Pinot Grigio. The hilly nature of this beautiful wine region creates different levels of altitude and aspects. In the vineyards with a sunnier aspect, the style of Pinot G is rich and ripe, while on the sites with less sun, the Pinot G is lighter and crisper.

Barossa Valley

The Barossa Valley is arguably Australia’s most famous wine region. Classified as warm climate, the Barossa provides excellent conditions for full-bodied wines with Shiraz, Cabernet Sauvignon and Grenache dominating the red plantings.

Home to some of the world’s oldest Shiraz vines, the Barossa makes bold, earthy Shiraz with characters of currants, plums, mulberries and milk chocolate. 
  Yalumba, Australia’s oldest family owned winery has lead the charge into newer styles planting and developing alternative varietals like Viognier and Tempranillo.

McLaren Vale


McLaren Vale is one of the most geologically diverse wine regions in the world with unique interactions between geology, soils, elevation, slope, aspect, rainfall, distance from the coast and macro-climatic differences all contributing factors.

With 3000 hectares of Shiraz vines, the milder nights and afternoon sea breezes create wines full of chocolatey richness with black fruit, violet, pepper and dark chocolate flavours.

While its hero varietal is Shiraz, McLaren Vale’s amazing landscape of geology makes it a truly special place to create a diverse range of wines. Local wineries like d’Arenberg, Primo Estate, Stephen Pannell, Richard Hamilton and Serafino are growing alternative varieties like Tempranillo, Sangiovese, Touriga, Mataro and Montepulciano alongside classic varietals of Shiraz, Cabernet and Grenache.

Clare Valley

Riesling is the hero in Clare Valley, making delicious wines with great depth and intensity, which can be enjoyed in the freshness of their youth or cellared with confidence for many years, taking on greater complexities while retaining their vibrant line of acidity.

Elevation is one of the factors that makes Clare such a prime region for grape growing and particularly for Riesling and Shiraz. Although not technically considered a ‘cool-climate’ area, most of the vineyards are planted at between 400 and 500 metres above sea level, meaning cool to cold nights during the growing season. Given its distance from the ocean, the region is also quite continental, so warm to hot during the day and quite dry while the vines are ripening their fruit. This diurnal temperature range makes for grapes with robust flavours and spicy acid freshness.

Although Clare Valley is more famously known for its Riesling, it’s the same climatic conditions that help to produce its unique style of red wine with the three top varieties being Shiraz, Cabernet and Grenache. Clare Valley reds present a delicious contradiction. On one hand they're big and bold, yet on the other, underlying acidity creates beautiful elegance.

Coonawarra

There’s no doubt that Coonawarra is home to Australia’s classic Cabernet Sauvignon. With its warm, dry summer days, cool to cold nights and terra rossa soil, the Coonawarra climate is similar to France's Bordeaux, so naturally, it's perfect for Cabernet! 
 
Measuring just 12km long and 2km wide, Coonawarra’s famed terra rossa strip is some of Australia’s best grape-growing land. While the vines have to struggle to flourish, they produce small berries with naturally high skin to juice ratio, mind-blowing colour and flavour intensity, and wonderful tannin structure. When it comes to Cabernet, it creates unique expressions featuring cassis and blackberry characters with spice and minerally complexity.

Along with Cabernet, the region also produces award-winning Riesling from wineries like Patrick of Coonawarra and Leconfield. Their Merlot is a must try along with the Di Giorgio Family Wines Sparkling Pinot Noir and Botrytis Semillon.

Eden Valley

The Eden Valley is an amazing region, capable of producing perfect cool climate wines from Chardonnay to Zinfandel, but it is more often recognised for Shiraz and Riesling.

Bordering the Barossa Valley, the Eden Valley’s altitude, cooler temperatures and cool nights produce wines with elegance and good acid structure. For most wine lovers, Eden Valley is famous for dry, crisp Riesling and elegant Shiraz. But there are plenty of producers who are seeing success with other varietals. Yalumba has almost single-handedly made Viognier a household name, while also having great success with Chardonnay and seeing a future for Roussanne and Tempranillo. Thorn-Clarke are turning plenty of heads with their Pinot Gris while Henschke produce some stunning Cabernet when “the conditions are warm enough” as well as Nebbiolo and Semillon. Irvine Wines, who have long championed Merlot, also have substantial plantings of Shiraz, Pinot Gris, Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, Riesling and Zinfandel spread across six vineyard sites.

Try some of South Australia’s stellar wines for yourself today!

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All Pizzazz - South Australian Shiraz
Words by Nick Ryan on 18 Aug 2015
It's a good and appropriate time to undertake a tasting of good ol’ South Australian Shiraz. While Pinot Noir is strapped tight to the rocket of rapidly ascending popularity and wine lists across Australia overflow with so-called ‘alternative’ varieties, the fact remains more bottles of Shiraz are consumed across the country than any other red variety and of those bottles the majority trace their origins to South Australian dirt. A good reason for the variety’s ubiquity is its ability to grow well in just about every wine region in the country and to present a different angle on its varietal character in each of those places. It really is our national barometer of terroir, the control that gives our experiments in regionality their context. When it gives us medium-bodied savouriness we’re in the Hunter, when it’s exuberantly spiced we’re in Canberra or central Victoria. When it’s all that and more we’re in South Australia. The results of a large tasting of South Australian Shiraz throwing up 30-odd top pointed wines offers a great opportunity to assess where the variety is at – they don’t call them State of Play tastings for nothing – and the results have presented some juicy food for thought. Some key observations follow. The Barossa is still king If we include the higher, cooler and bonier vineyards of the Eden Valley along with those down on the Valley floor, then the Barossa has produced almost half of the top pointed wines in the tasting. That shouldn’t really surprise us, after all the Barossa has always been South Australia’s Shiraz heartland. But what’s really exciting is the diversity of styles across the wines that performed well. “Ten years ago you could be forgiven for thinking Barossa Shiraz was pretty much all the same,” says senior Red Winemaker at Yalumba, Kevin Glastonbury. “A lot of the Barossa’s best wines were blended from across the region and made to a certain style, but now there’s a much greater focus on capturing what’s special about great single vineyards.” That’s got to be a good thing considering the Barossa has some of the greatest viticultural resources on the planet, including some wizened, deep-rooted old vineyards that date back to the early days of the South Australian colony. Zooming in closer on the Barossa’s viticultural map has also given a deeper understanding of sub-regionality across the Barossa. Glastonbury is well placed to comment on this development, having had a significant hand in two high-pointed wines in the tasting, each one representing a different approach to Barossa Shiraz Yalumba’s 2010 Paradox Shiraz is an outstanding example of this new way of thinking about Barossa Shiraz. Its vineyard sourcing is drawn from a narrow band across the northern Barossa, primarily around Kalimna, Ebenezer and up towards Moppa Springs, and the winemaking is carefully controlled to express the character of this corner of the region. “We want something that’s really savoury and supple rather than hefty and sweet fruited,” he explains. “We also back right off on the new oak and use old French puncheons.” Glastonbury is also a big fan of the distinctly different fruit that comes of vineyards up in the Eden Valley. “The nature of the place allows us to apply a few winemaking techniques that work well with that finer fruit. We’ve started to do things like a bit of whole bunch fermentation in some Octavius parcels and it really adds an extra dimension to the style.” The Barossa is clearly in a golden age South Australian Shiraz is becoming cool and getting high. Anyone labouring under the out-dated impression that South Australian Shiraz is all big flesh and brute power should look to the impressive number of top pointed wines in the tasting coming from the Limestone Coast and Adelaide Hills. Wines from Zema, Wynns and Brands help us realise there’s more to Coonawarra than just Cabernet Sauvignon and remind us that the famous terra rossa soils can produce outstanding, fine framed and elegant Shiraz. It’s particularly exciting to see a wine from Wrattonbully – Coonawarra’s near neighbour to the north – a region that really has the capacity to produce a fragrantly spicy Shiraz style. If this tasting took place a decade ago, we’d be surprised to see a single entrant from the cool, elevated vineyards of the Adelaide Hills, but in 2015 we have five breaking into the Top 30. Where many saw Pinot Noir as the future star when vineyards began to take root in the Adelaide Hills, it’s been Shiraz that has performed best. The Hills offers a huge diversity of sites for growing Shiraz and canny winemakers have harnessed this diversity to produce some of the most impressive cool climate Shiraz in the country.  Clare is the real dark horse One of the really significant elements of this tasting has been the strong performance of the Clare Valley. Clare attracts most attention for its Riesling, and while Shiraz lovers might look closer to Adelaide for their red wine thrills, it’s clear that the distinctive, consistent and exceedingly delicious Clare Shiraz style is something very special. Andrew Mitchell has been making Shiraz in Clare for four decades and his Mitchell Wines ‘McNicol’ Shiraz 2005 was the highest pointed wine of the tasting. “When we first started this place most people in Clare used Shiraz for making port,” he says. “ Even when table wines started taking off in the 70s, the market really wanted Cabernet, but I’ve always known Clare Shiraz was something pretty special. “Clare Shiraz can give you power, intensity, depth and length, but does it all with great balance and a kind of elegance that I think defines the regional style. “And it ages really well too. That’s why we release the McNicol with bottle age. I want people to experience just how beautiful these wines can be when mature.” There is such a wide range of Shiraz styles scattered throughout the top wines in this tasting that we can safely say there’s a South Australian Shiraz to suit just about any palate. The key word in discussing these results is ‘diversity’. The one obvious conclusion to be drawn from these results is that to talk of South Australian Shiraz as one homogenous thing is unjust. There is such a wide range of Shiraz styles scattered throughout the top wines in this tasting that we can safely say there’s a South Australian Shiraz to suit just about any palate. Click here see the Wine Selectors range of Shiraz
Wine
The Best Tasmanian Wineries & Cellar Doors 2019
Remote, cold and rugged, but above all spectacular, Tasmania’s reputation as a cool climate wine growing region – and holiday destination – par excellence continues to grow, punching well above its weight against those across the Bass Strait. Take a tour of Tasmania’s best wineries and cellar doors for 2019 with this Guide from Wine Selectors. The climate might be cool but Tasmania’s status as a premium destination for food and wine lovers is hotter than ever. While the region saw its first commercial vineyards take root in 1865, these plantings were short-lived, and it wasn’t until the 1970s that winemakers started again in earnest to explore the potential locked up in the soils of old Van Diemen’s Land.  What has become apparent is that, in terms of climate and soil, the region is an ideal place to make cool climate wines really shine. From the sandstone and schist of the Derwent Valley to the peaty alluvial soils of Coal River Valley and the gravelly basalt, clay and limestone of the Tamar, Tasmanian Chardonnay and Pinot Noir in particular have commanded the attention of the world for their heightened flavours, aromas and elegance. Tasmanian Sparkling, too, is now widely regarded as Australia’s finest, evoking favourable comparisons to the qualities of Champagne. Indeed, with some wineries now seeing their third generation take the reins and a host of young guns pushing the envelope, the scene there has become as dynamic and vibrant as the wines that result from such passion and dedication. Read on for Wine Selectors top picks for the best Tasmanian wineries and cellar doors for 2019. Nocton Vineyard Situated in the rolling hills of the upper Coal River Valley, Nocton Vineyard was planted in 1999, making it among the valley’s oldest. Taking its name from an old Scottish term for ‘farmstead where wethered sheep are kept’, it consists of over 34 hectares of ‘winemaking nirvana’, where rich dolerite-based soils and Triassic sandstone subsoil harmonises with pristine air and pure water for sublime growing conditions. Nocton produces a large array of cool climate wines that convey the terroir marvellously, including Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Sparkling. They’re even pioneering cool climate Merlot, which is sure to intrigue – visit their cellar door to discover it for yourself. Just 15 minutes from Hobart Airport, it’s a small venue with a big view, offering tailored and tutored tastings with Estate and Reserve labels poured for you to explore and enjoy. 373 Colebrook Road, Richmond TAS 7025 Thursday to Monday 10am to 4pm Visit the Nocton Vineyard website Pooley Wines Established in 1985, Pooley Wines lays claim to being Tasmania’s first third generation wine family. With two unique sites in the Coal River Valley of Southern Tasmania, Cooinda and Butcher’s Hill, they are also Tasmania’s first and only fully accredited environmentally certified sustainable vineyard, with a host of trophies and medals to their name. Across the two sites viticulturist Matthew Pooley and winemaker Anna Pooley produce superb cool climate specialties that express the region at its best, including Pinot G, Riesling, Chardonnay and Pinot Noir, as well as distinctive takes on Syrah, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot. No visit to Pooley would be complete without taking a tasting flight at the historic Belmont House, an 1830 sandstone stables and coach house and home to their cellar door. Awarded Gourmet Traveller’s Best Small Cellar Door in Southern Tasmania on four occasions (most recently in 2017 and 2018) as well as Best Wine Tasting Experience in Southern Tasmania in 2016 and 2019, it’s an introduction to premium Tasmanian wine not to be missed. Butcher’s Hill Vineyard & Cellar Door 1431 Richmond Rd, Richmond TAS 7025 Open daily 10am to 5pm Visit the Pooley Wines website Grey Sands Grey Sands Vineyard seeks to push the boundaries of what is possible in wine, with a focus on exciting the senses through wines that are “concentrated, complex, intriguing and sometimes confronting”. The westernmost of Tamar Valley vineyards, it was started by Bob and Rita Richter on a grass-covered block of land in 1987. Deciding against irrigation, the resulting vineyard is entirely hard, hand-pruned and close-planted to ensure maximum concentration rather than yield. Minimal intervention is the order of the day, allowing the fruit its own natural expression, and across the seventeen varieties grown at Grey Sands there is extraordinary scope to experience wines unlike anywhere else. Those eager to sample the intrigue of Grey Sands are recommended to visit the Grey Sands ‘cellar door’. Distinct from the typical cellar door, Bob and Rita have established a ‘collector’s garden’, a marvellous arrangement of mature conifers, birches, maples, exotic perennials and more to enjoy a picnic in, with a lovely view towards the Tamar Valley. Or join them on their deck, if the weather allows! A genuine one-of-a-kind winery, and a must-see for visitors to the region. 6 Kerrisons Rd, Glengarry TAS 7275 Open the first whole weekend of the month October to April only, 12pm to 5pm, or by appointment. Visit the Grey Sands website. Devil's Corner Located along the East Coast of Tasmania two hours by car from Hobart, Devil’s Corner embraces its wild remoteness with a passion to produce award-winning cool climate wines of unmistakeable character, from Riesling to Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc and more, as well as an esteemed range of Pinot Noirs. Visitors are encouraged to experience the premium wines alongside the freshly-shucked flavours of Freycinet Peninsula oysters at The Fishers, from the nearby Freycinet Marine Farm, or accompanied by a pizza from Tombolo Café. Undoubtedly however, the highlight – besides wines from the sure hand of winemaker Tom Wallace – is the lookout, an architecturally-designed tower offering unparalleled views of vineyards sweeping down to Moulting Lagoon against the backdrop of the Hazard Ranges. It all makes for a memorable, ultra-modern destination, that’s more than worth the journey.  1 Sherbert Avenue, Apslawn TAS 7190 Open daily from 10am to 5pm Visit the Devil's Corner website Tamar Ridge In the heart of the Tamar Valley and on the banks of the Tamar River you’ll find Tamar Ridge, where passion and science meet in pursuit of premium wines. Primarily specialising in Pinot Noir but with Pinot G, Sauvignon Blanc and Riesling also in the mix, vines are planted on northerly and north-easterly undulating slopes, with soils consisting of clay subsoils and topsoils of quartz sand to clay loam. The differing soil types allows the planting of a variety of Pinot Noir clones, while the strong maritime climate protects the grapes from the extremes, with long sunny days and gentle rains producing the ideal growing conditions for wines of quality and character. At the Cellar Door, visitors can taste their way through an immersive flight of Pinot Noir and other cool climate specialties, and share a bit to eat from local seasonal platters from on-site friends Hubert + Dan on the deck, or down on the lawn, enjoying enchanting views of the pristine Tamar Valley. Sublime. 1A Waldhorn Drive, Rosevears TAS 7277 Open daily from 10am to 5pm Visit the Tamar Ridge website Bay of Fires Home to three premium wines labels in their own right – House of Arras, Bay of Fires and Eddystone Point – Bay of Fires Cellar Door is a wine lover’s dream. Each label focusses on different winemaking philosophies and styles, but one thing is consistent between them – they all reflect the unique Tasmanian terroir of their surroundings. A collaborative venture founded in 1990 by a team of passionate winemakers and viticulturists sharing a common dream, Bay of Fire presents alluring wines that are distinctly Tasmanian – handpicked, and specially selected for quality and character. The cellar door itself, a modern, welcoming venue, offers sweeping views over the vines, the winery and Pipers River, set amidst an ideal backdrop of beautiful, established gardens. Seated Tastings are available, where visitors are taken through the details of Methode Traditionelle Sparkling winemaking for Vintage Arras Sparkling Wines, before delving into Bay of Fires’ still wines and notable award winners. There’s also the 1.5hr Premium Arras Experience, offering a tour of the winery and vineyard before proceeding through a tasting of $500 worth of Arras Sparkling at a private tasting. Hard to beat, for those looking to indulge a little! 40 Baxters Road, Pipers River TAS 7252 Open Thursday to Monday, 10am to 5pm Visit the Bay of Fires website Josef Chromy Recognised for his commitment and contribution to quality food and wine in Tasmania, Josef Chromy OAM has owned and developed some of Tasmania’s leading wineries such as Rochemcombe, Jansz and Heemskerk. Josef Chromy Wines is the culmination of his experience in Tasmania’s Tamar Valley, offering visitors a chance to explore the passion and product of one of our premier winemakers with tastings, vineyard tours, and more. Today, his charming cellar door is set inside the original 1880s homestead, surrounded by stunning manicured gardens, and idyllic views over the surrounding vineyards and lakes. Relax inside by the open log fire, or stop for lunch in the hatted Josef Chromy Restaurant for excellent locally sourced produce matched to the elegant, cool climate Sparkling, aromatic whites, Chardonnay and Pinot Noir on offer. One of the pinnacles of Australian winemaking, and an essential stop on any wine tour of Tasmania. 370 Relbia Rd, Relbia TAS 7258 Open daily from 10am to 5pm Visit the Josef Chromy website Moorilla at Mona No mention of Tasmania’s cellar door scene could pass without listing Moorilla at MONA. The second Tasmanian winery to be established and the longest in continual operation, Moorilla was founded in 1962 and focusses on a small, yet high quality output with estate-grown fruit, small batch winemaking in a gravity-assisted winery. The best way to experience their ultra-premium wines is at MONA’s exquisite cellar door. Take a seat beneath a bona-fide John Olson masterpiece to sample their iconic wines, which emphasise texture and complexity as well as Sparkling styles. There are over 18 to choose from, but if you’re craving something different, selections from their Moo Brew beer label are also available to explore. Or better still, take a guided tour of the Moorilla Vineyard, and taste vino straight from the tank for the ultimate way of immersing yourself in the works of a legendary name in Tasmanian winemaking. 665 Main Road, Berriedale 7011 Open daily 9:30am to 5 pm Visit the Moorilla website Pipers Brook Nestled in the heart of Tasmanian wine country, Pipers Brook Vineyard in the Tamar region has been producing exceptional cool climate wines since 1974. The unique combination of geography, temperate climate and proximity to Bass Strait helps to capture the purity of Tasmania across their range of award-winning wines, with particular emphasis given to Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, Pinot Gris and Riesling along with Sparkling – all estate-grown and bottled for the highest control of the resulting product. Tasmania’s largest family-owned winemaker, its cellar door offers tastings of the Pipers Brook, Kreglinger and Ninth Island ranges for you to sample while learning about the vineyard’s history, with a café offering a seasonal menu of locally-sourced produce that makes for a perfect grazing experience. For those after something a little more exclusive, guests can book the two-bedroom Pipers Brook Villa and wake each morning to stunning views overlooking the estate’s vineyards. Further, if you’re travelling by campervan, make sure to book ahead to secure free onsite RV parking. Beat a path to Pipers Brook, and experience all that one of the original pioneers in Tasmanian wine has to offer. 1216 Pipers Brook Rd, Pipers Brook TAS 7254 Open daily from 10am to 4pm (Summer), Thursday to Monday 11am to 4pm (Winter) Visit the Pipers Brook website More information For more information on visiting Tasmania, be sure to visit the official  Wine Tasmania website . But, if you'd like to sample some of the wineries listed in this guide before you visit, explore our wide selection of  Tasmanian wines and find out more about the wineries listed here in our  Meet the Makers section. What’s more, with the Wine Selectors Regional Release program, you'll experience a different wine region each Release with all wines expertly selected by our Tasting Panel, plus you'll receive comprehensive tasting notes and fascinating insights into each region. Visit our  Regular Deliveries  page to find out more!
Two Blues Sauvignon Blanc 2014
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