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Food

Beef cheeks in baharat spice with roasted brussels sprouts and soft polenta

Preparation time
10 minutes
Cooking time
6+ hours
Serves
4 - 6

INGREDIENTS

  • 1.3kg approx. (4) beef cheeks
  • 2 tbsp baharat spice mix
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • ¹/³ cup (80ml) extra virgin olive oil
  • ½ (125ml) cup dry sherry
  • 2 cups (500ml) good red wine
  • 2 large onions, roughly chopped
  • 2 celery stalks, roughly chopped
  • 6 cloves garlic, roughly chopped
  • 2 cups (500ml) beef stock
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 6 sprigs thyme
  • Salt flakes and black pepper, to taste
  • 2 bunches Dutch carrots, steamed, to serve
  • Micro herbs

Roasted brussels sprouts

  • 750g brussels sprouts, trimmed
  • 2 tbsp caramelised balsamic or vincotto
  • 2 tbsp (40g) butter

Polenta

  • 1½ cups (375ml) chicken stock or water
  • 1½ cups (375ml) water
  • 1½ cups (255g) instant polenta
  • 1 cup (250ml) milk
  • 1 tbsp butter

METHOD

  1. Preheat the oven to 150ºC. Pat beef cheeks dry with paper towel and rub with spice mix. Season with salt and pepper.
  2. Heat a large frying pan over medium heat, add half the olive oil and brown the cheeks on each side. Remove beef cheeks to an oven-proof casserole dish. Deglaze the frying pan with sherry and red wine then reduce by half and add to the casserole.
  3. Wipe out the frying pan and add remaining olive oil. Add onions and celery to soften. Add garlic and cook a minute more. Deglaze with beef stock. Add to the casserole with bay leaves and thyme, cover, place in the oven. Turn the beef cheeks frequently. Check after 2 hours. They may take up 6 hours to be tender. Uncover for final hour of cooking, still turning a few times.
  4. Cook sprouts in salted simmering water for 4–5 minutes or until just tender. Drain and cut in halves, reserving any loose leaves. Place on a baking tray with leaves, drizzle with balsamic, butter, salt and pepper and place in oven. Cook for 30 minutes. (Sprouts can also be cooked in hot oven for 10 minutes).
  5. For the polenta: Combine the stock and water in a medium saucepan; bring to the boil, gradually stir in the polenta. Cook over a low heat, stirring occasionally, until the liquid is absorbed and the polenta is tender. Stir in the milk and season to taste with salt and pepper and stir through butter. Set aside and whisk occasionally.
  6. To serve: place polenta on plate, top with beef and drizzle over sauce. Garnish with micro herbs, serve with sprouts, carrots.
Food
Preparation time
10 minutes
Cooking time
6+ hours
Serves
4 - 6

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