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Australian wineries delivered to your door!

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Wine

Meet Warren Proft from Chrismont

To celebrate Chrismont’s La Zona Prosecco being our Wine of the Month for September, we caught up with winemaker, Warren Proft.

You’ve made every Chrismont wine since it began in 1999 – what major changes in Australian wine tastes have you seen during that time?

Australian wine consumers in the last 20 years have made a quantum leap from what was really just 6 varieties and styles to being interested in wines from all over the world. People are more interested in trying different styles and varieties and celebrating the diversity that is wine.

What made you decide to stay in the King Valley?

King Valley is a beautiful area close to all the places I like to hang out. But ultimately the local community is incredibly warm, generous and hospitable which made us feel at home the minute we moved in.

Prosecco is a style that’s really taken Australian wine-lovers by storm – what do you think makes it so appealing?

Prosecco is a very friendly wine to drink unlike other sparkling wines that are traditionally more acidic. Prosecco also has an image of being fun and unashamedly promotes itself with mixing cocktails as well as being great on its own.

What makes the La Zona Prosecco stand out from the crowd?

Coming from the King Valley, The La Zona Prosecco inherits the regions strong expression of varietal fruit which is an aspect we try to preserve. A well balanced level of dosage to complement the acidity and a dry finish makes the wine memorably moreish.

What is your all-time favourite wine memory (other than a wine itself)?

When I was working in Spain, the local community held their ‘fiesta del vinos’ which was an eye opener and experience. The main parade involved everyone, children to grandparents, all dancing and squirting each other with wine having a great time. It really drove home the point to me how wine is so integrated into their society and way of life.

Other than your own wine, what is the wine that you like to drink at home?

I like to try everything. We are always bringing home different wines.

What is your ultimate food and wine match?

Seafood pasta with a crisp white like Riesling or Arneis.

What do you do to relax away from the winery?

Chill out with my family and friends, and make (real) cider.

What is your favourite…

Book?

Into the void

Movie?

Pulp Fiction – all time classic

TV show?

No time for TV

Restaurant? 

Rinaldos – Wangaratta

Provenence – Beechworth

Breakfast?

Fruit, yogurt, muesli

Lunch? 

Pasta carbonara

Dinner?

Slow cooked lamb

Time of day/night? 

Dawn and dusk

Sporting team? 

Daughters’ netball teams

Beer? 

Bridge road ‘Robust Porter, King River Brewing ‘Saison’

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Wine
Behind The Vine At Helen's Hill
To celebrate the  Helen's Hill Ingram Road Pinot Noir 2015  being our April Wine of the Month, we caught up with Allan Nalder from  Helen's Hill . What makes the Ingram Road 2015 Pinot Noir so appealing? To answer that I need to take a step back. All of our wines are 100% single vineyard and are all made at my winery. Only fruit that we grow on our vineyard goes into the wines that we make. It's not that we don't trust anyone, it's just that we don't trust anyone. We think this is super important. Come visit and I can take you to the very vines that make the wine you are going to enjoy. Call us "control freaks". I'll take it as a compliment. The  Ingram Rd 2015 Pinot Noir  benefits greatly from this approach. Pristine  Yarra Valley  single vineyard fruit, French oak maturation, careful "hands-off" winemaking and a great vintage all combine to produce a wine that expresses hallmark  Pinot Noir  characteristics. And its price point is extremely compelling. You have over 50 acres of Pinot Noir, what makes you so enthusiastic about this often-difficult grape? You're right, Pinot Noir is a difficult grape to grow and can really only grow well in specific, little tucked away corners of the world. The Yarra Valley, and the little patch of dirt I call home, is one of those places. It also helps to be a bit of a Pinot Noir fanatic. To me, it is one of the most remarkable red wines in the world. I once saw a quote about Pinot Noir growers from a wine writer: "its makers are lunatic-fringe, questers after the holy grail…" - Marc de Villiers wine writer. We fit that mould. Who is the Helen of the hill? We bought the property from Mr. Fraser in the mid 90s. He had owned the pasture land from the early 1950s. The reason he bought the land was because he fell in love with a woman called Helen, who wouldn't marry him unless he owned a farm. True love prevailed and he bought the farm. Sadly, Helen passed away some 6-7 years after their marriage. Mr Fraser never re-married and throughout the property inspection, he recalled many stories of Helen and her time there. From his stories, it was obvious that she had a passion for the land. We share that passion and thought it appropriate to name the vineyard after her. What makes Scott McCarthy a standout winemaker? To be blunt, the fruit. We live by the very old, well used, but absolutely true saying: "great wine is made in the vineyard". The most important decision we make in the winery is deciding when to pick the fruit. The rest of the process is relatively simple. Pristine quality fruit allows us to rely on natural fermentation, minimal filtering and minimal winemaking intervention. Our ethos is not to describe "perfection" as when there is nothing left to add, but rather, when there is nothing left to take away. We feel this is the key to winemaking. Ensure that we do as little as possible so we can deliver mother nature in the bottle. You also  make a range of beers  - why did you decide to go into brewing and what do you think makes a top beer? It gets pretty hot and sweaty picking grapes. Added to that, I ain't getting any younger, so after a big day in the fields a nice, cold craft beer is a perfect tonic. As winemakers and vignerons go, we drink a lot of beer, so it wasn't that hard to come up with the idea of brewing our own. Getting the recipe right, the choice of hops and quality malt is critical and keeping the fermentation process under control. The rest depends on what you like. We serve our brews at Cellar Door and luckily our customers reckon they're pretty tasty. What are the top 3 attractions you'd recommend to a first-time Yarra Valley visitor? The great thing about the Yarra Valley is the diversity. You can visit the  YV Dairy  and sample a variety of cheese, the Chocolate Factory, world class art museum, on-farm produce stores for things such as apples, strawberries, etc, 6 top golf courses, mountain biking, bush trails, historic buildings, micro breweries, gin distillery and of course the odd cellar door and vineyard restaurant. The valley really has a huge range of things to do. Obviously, a great place to start is Helen's Hill. Full al-carte restaurant on top of the hill with sensational views or our Cellar Door and casual dining nestled down in the winery amongst the vines.
Wine
Meet Alex Russell of Alejandro Wines
More and more alternative wine varietals are being grown and produced here in Australia. We catch-up with Alex Russell to chat about his passion for these delicious drops and his exciting alejandro range. Your alejandro label focuses on a diverse selection of alternative varieties of European origin including Montepulciano, Nero d’Avola, Fiano and Arneis – why these varieties? Shortly after starting work for Angove in Renmark, the then chief winemaker Warrick Billings, introduced me to Riverland Vine Improvement Committee (RVIC). RVIC at the time was an importer of new varieties and they would propagate the vines and produce trial wine from them. I agreed to produce trial wine for them on a voluntary basis. I bottled their 2008 vintage and started making wine for them in 2009, in addition to my role at Angove. Before long, we were crushing far more than anticipated and the facility was filled with small winemaking equipment I had been accumulating since the early 2000s. As far as choosing different varieties, I’ve never accepted the status quo. In 2011, Fiano , Vermentino and Montepulciano were bullet-proof during the worst vintage we had had in 30 years and the latter two went on to win Gold medals at the Australian Alternative Varieties Wine Show. From there I led RVIC into their own label, Cirami Estate. It was a little too entrepreneurial for RVIC and we parted ways after vintage 2014 at which point alejandro was born. I didn’t choose these varieties, they chose me. These varieties are perfectly suited to being grown in the Riverland and Mildura and produce textured, flavoursome and distinctly varietal wines. What would you say to our Members to encourage them to try more of these varieties?

If you enjoy wine enough to purchase through Wine Selectors, you know enough about wine to broaden your horizons. Have an open mind, ignore the name, even set up a blind tasting with friends, and just take the wine for what it is – it’s much easier to remember Saperavi or Bianco d’Alessano when you’ve had a great experience with them.

What makes the Riverland region so suited to growing Mediterranean-style and alternative varieties? Riverland and Mildura regions are equally suited to alternative varietal wines. If you’ve travelled to Spain or Italy during summer months, you’ll know the climates in Mildura and Renmark are very similar. The regions are hot and dry, with low disease pressure and there is so much sun. These varieties love sun and heat with Montepulciano ripening among the latest of all – late April for vintage 2017. Many of these wines, Graciano and Tempranillo , are as boozy in Spain as they are here. That said, the whites are produced with moderate alcohol to retain their fresh, distinctive flavours. Can you recall the first wine you tried? My parents always drank wine – from a cask. We had sips of wine here and there, but the best memory of my first wine was following work selling pies at the footy – the MCG. I was 14 or 15 years old and I had made my first wine by this stage, but I remember this fondly because it involved getting wine from the super boxes of the old northern stand. The foil capsule had been removed from these reds and were therefore unsalable. I took the bottles home with quite a number of Four’n’Twenty pies and my father and I sat on the couch and we ate pies and drank red wine together. Making it more memorable for me was how hot and red in the face I became having bumped consumption from a few sips to a couple of glasses. When did you fall in love with wine? I think I fell in love with making booze before I fell in love with wine. I was always close with my dad, he’s gone now, but he loved his beer. I used my pie selling income to buy a home brew kit from Kmart and produced Coopers Lager – though this was after I’d made my first mash beer using 4.5L demijohns and every item of stainless in the kitchen. Do you remember that moment? What happened? After the first mash came, Coopers, ginger beer, apple cider, elderberry wine and in Year 10, I made my first Shiraz, ironically from Shiraz juice concentrate out of a can from the Riverland ’s Berri. Another memorable moment was vintage 2002 in Mildura, working for Littore Family Wines. At the time they had a Merlot block in Gol Gol with 2000m long rows. I found a rogue vine in row 57 from the north end, 16 panels to the south. It was an off-white variety, I picked the fruit and soon realized it was Gewürztraminer. My housemates and I drank that wine before it had finished fermenting. Do you have an all-time favourite wine to make? Why is it this wine? That’s like asking who your favourite child is – all wines are different and there’s an occasion for each. I do like making Montepulciano, but mainly drink Tempranillo and Durif. Now with a vineyard in Tasmania, I also produce Pinot Noir which is a very interesting wine. There’s a wine for every occasion and every appetite. There are some 15 wines in my range – gives me a lot of choice! Other than your own wine, what is the wine that you like to drink at home? I like to compare competitors’ wines, like varieties and other obscure varieties, but the quaffers I like are Rosé wines. I’m not a fan of Cabernet Rosé or ‘drain off’ Rosé but give me a purpose produced Rosé with four days cold soak and I’m all over it. What is your ultimate food and wine match? My first experience with such food was at the 2012 Australian Alternative Varieties Wine Show where Stephano di Pierre cooked and we had Vermentino with freshly shucked oysters with lemon and fresh oregano. Tempura Sardines are great with Bianco d’Alessano. In Tasmania we grow Wiltshire Horn sheep for meat. They mow the vineyard down in winter and keep hard to slash areas clean during the growing season. The meat is rich, tender and moist – Lagrein is a good match for this lamb. Can you cook? If so, what is your ‘signature dish’? My wife and I lived in China for 12 months, near the North Korean border. I used to cook a lot more but now my wife cooks anything and everything, she has a knack for it. When I cook I go Chinese and cook the dongbei cai from the north east of China, Dalian and Pulandian. These are better suited to Tsingtao and Mi Jiu and although considered qiung ren cai (poor man’s food) they are simple and delicious: Ban san ding is chopped cucumber and red onion with fresh roasted peanuts (skin on) with fish sauce and sesame oil dressing (and a dash of MSG). Tu dou zi is shredded potato with carrot, green chilli and garlic, stir fried for about 30 seconds with fish sauce and sesame oil. Xie hong shi chao ji dan is stir fried egg and tomato, again with fish and sesame, and don’t forget the garlic. It’s simple and really quick to prepare. What do you think is special about your wine region? Tasmania is now home and we are expanding our vineyard. Pinot is a great variety to grow and produce and the whites are excellent – although most visitors are left a little wanting for a big red. Riverland and Mildura (and Riverina) are the work engines for Australian wine and where I gained all my experience. They are quickly snubbed by many but do produce good wine. My greatest criticism of South Australia and the Riverland is that even many Riverland businesses dismiss their own wines when tourists ask for something local, offering Clare or Barossa instead. Do you have a favourite holiday destination/memory? Spain. Fly into Barcelona and jump in a rental car and head up to Ainsa, Mont Serrat. We have a winemaker friend named Ara there who I worked at Zilzie with in 2008. She came back to Australia for vintage 2012 in the Riverland and might have helped a little with alejandro in 2016 when she was here on holiday. Ara lives in Hellin and produces wine from Murcia region. Spanish food, wine and beer – ahhh! What is your favourite… Movie? Gladiator. I’m a wanna be Maximus, and the sound track I used to play when I slept – my housemates were worried at the time. TV show? Dexter, everyone loves it when a baddie gets it. Big Bang Theory because I was one of those nerds – a cross between Howard and Leonard. Sport/Sporting Team? Cricket…. Beer? My taste constantly changes depending on the day or the menu, but I love hoppy beers and stouts and pilsners with saaz and hallertau hops.
Wine
5 of the Best King Valley Wineries and Cellar Doors
Discover the best King Valley wineries and cellar doors to taste and experience the region’s delights with our guide and interactive map. When Italian migrants arrived in the King Valley after World War II to work on the Snowy Hydro Scheme and to farm tobacco, they planted vines to help them feel at home. Today, the region is arguably the leader in alternative wines, especially Italian styles like Arneis , Barbera , Nebbiolo , Sangiovese and more recently, Prosecco . And the classic Italian trio of great wine, superb food and warm hospitality is on show every day in the region’s wineries and cellar doors. The best way to visit the region is to start at either Brown Brothers in Milawa or Chrismont in Cheshunt and then track along the Wangaratta-Whitfield Road, known affectionately as the Prosecco Road. The King Valley introduced Prosecco to the nation in the early 2000s and now the very mention of Australian Prosecco is synonymous with the region. You can find out more about  Prosecco and its difference to traditional Sparkling wine here . To help plan your trip, we’ve selected a collection of King Valley wineries we feel provide the best cellar door experience, plus we’ve included a handy interactive map down below . King Valley Cellar Doors List Brown Brothers
The perfect place to start or end your visit to the King Valley is in Milawa at the winery that started it all, Brown Brothers . There is little question that this family-owned operation has had a remarkable impact on the wine industry with a consistent focus on introducing new wine varieties and winemaking techniques to Australia.  In the friendly cellar door, there is a vast range of wines to taste from approachable everyday styles through to their flagship Patricia range. There is also a great selection of cellar door only wines made from the Kindergarten winery, where their winemakers experiment with and nurture a wide range of new wine styles and winemaking techniques. If you can, make sure you book ahead for a tasting tour of the winery and the Kindergarten to learn more about what tomorrow’s wines will be. 244 Milawa-Bobinawarrah Rd, Milawa – view on our map Open daily 9am–5pm Visit the Brown Brothers website Sam Miranda Wines
Once you turn onto Snow Road, it's hard to miss the Sam Miranda Wines cellar door with its striking 10-metre tower, which acts as a giant periscope, funnelling natural light down into the modern tasting room and underground wine cellar. The cellar door restaurant focuses on sourcing ingredients from within a 50km radius and serves up an authentic Italian menu that matches perfectly with their superb range of Mediterranean varieties available to taste, including Prosecco , Pinot Grigio , Sangiovese and Nebbiolo. And, if you’re touring the King Valley by bike, you’ll find a very warm welcome as Sam, a self-confessed cycling tragic, hosts a full calendar of cycling events and competitions each year.  1019 Snow Rd, Oxley – view on our map Open daily 10am–5pm Visit the Sam Miranda Wines website Pizzini Wines
This charming winery is a must visit for any trip to the King Valley. As a pioneering specialist in Italian varietals, there’s a great range of Pinot Grigio, Arneis, Verduzzo, Prosecco, Sangiovese and Nebbiolo available to sample. And, with a boutique guest house among the vines , regular events, winery tours and cooking classes at Katrina Pizzini’s A tavola! cooking school , this family-run operation has something for everyone. 175 King Valley Rd, Whitfield – view on our map Open daily 10am–5pm Visit the Pizzini Wines website Politini Wines
Like many in the King Valley, the Politini family started in tobacco farming in the 1950s before moving into wine in the 1980s. Today, they specialise in the varieties of Salvatore Politini’s Sicilian roots with Nero d’Avola, Grecanico, Vermentino, Sangiovese and more. The idyllic two-bedroom Casolare (Italian for ‘cottage’) accommodation on the property is the perfect base to explore the picturesque King Valley. Or, you can take your love of Italian food and wine to the next level as you learn how to prepare the perfect Sicilian dish to pair with your Politini wines in Nonna Josie’s Cooking Experience classes. 65 Upper King River Rd, Cheshunt – view on our map Open daily 10am–5pm Visit the Politini Wines website Chrismont
At the southern end of the Prosecco Road is the new Chrismont cellar door, restaurant and larder. With its sleek lines, sophisticated architecture and idyllic position among the vines, there is little wonder it took out the coveted National Building Design of the Year Award in 2016. Inside, you’ll find a great range of old world varieties to taste, such as their cool climate Rieslings and premium Sparkling through to the King Valley’s famed Mediterranean varieties in their fantastic La Zona range of Prosecco, Arneis, Sagrantino and more. The Chrismont restaurant focuses on the flavours of Italy's north and south, the perfect match for their wines.  And, with  their elegant boutique guest house overlooking the vines, it’s the perfect place to base your adventures in the region or as your final destination after a day trekking and tasting your way along the Prosecco Road. 251 Upper King River Rd, Cheshunt – view on our map Open daily 10am–5pm Visit the Chrismont website King Valley Winery Map Planning a trip to the King Valley? Download our interactive King Valley winery map. To save on your browser or device, click here For more information on visiting King Valley, be sure to visit the official King Valley website or stop by the visitor information centre on Murphy Street in Wangaratta. But, if you'd like to sample some of the wineries listed in this guide before you visit, explore our selection of King Valley wines and find out more about the wineries listed here in our Meet the Makers section . And, with the Wine Selectors Regional Release program, you'll experience a different wine region each Release with all wines expertly selected by our Tasting Panel, plus you’ll receive comprehensive tasting notes and fascinating insights into each region. Visit our wine plans section to find out more!
Two Blues Sauvignon Blanc 2014
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