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Food

Tetsuya Wakudu’s Slow roasted snapper with olive, capers and tomato recipe

Preparation time
20 minutes
Cooking time
40 minutes
Serves
4

The Mediterranean elements in this seafood dish lend it to this issue’s Rosé from Krinklewood in the Hunter Valley. A biodynamically produced wine, it has lifted aromas of spice and orange rind with an harmonious palate of sweet and savoury elements making it the perfect pairing for the fine, umami-rich flavours in this dish.

Ingredients

  • 1.5kg whole snapper, cleaned
  • 375ml white wine
  • 500g bottle Kalamata olives, undrained
  • 500ml water
  • 1/3 cup salted capers, rinsed
  • 4 cloves garlic, smashed
  • ½ punnet cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 1 tbsp dried oregano
  • 6 slices fresh ginger
  • 2 tsp mirin
  • 2 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • 2 tsp sea salt
  • ½ tsp white pepper
  • 1/3 cup finely chopped flat leaf parsley, extra to serve
  • ¾ cup olive tapenade
  • Balsamic vinegar

Method

  1. Pre-heat oven to 150°C.
  2. Wash snapper under cold water. Pat dry with paper towel. Place in a baking dish. Add wine, olives, brine, water, capers, garlic, tomatoes, oregano, ginger and mirin to baking dish, keeping liquid from top of snapper.
  3. Pour soy sauce and olive oil over exposed skin of snapper. Sprinkle with sea salt. Sprinkle white pepper around fin. Bake fish for 40 minutes or until fish flakes easily when tested with a fork. Garnish with parsley.
  4. Place a small amount of olive tapenade in serving bowls. Top with fish, tomatoes and sauce. Add extra flat leaf parsley and balsamic vinegar to finish.

Wine match: Krinklewood Francesca Rosé 2016

Food
Preparation time
20 minutes
Cooking time
40 minutes
Serves
4

Wine match

Krinklewood Francesca Rosé 2016
$21.25
in any 12
$22.50
in any 6
$25.00
each
Price | options
$21.25
in any 12 bottles
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Two Blues Sauvignon Blanc 2014
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