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Wine

Know Your Variety - Nero d'Avola

Nero davola alternate variety guide tasting notes food pairing and infographic

Adam Walls introduces the Italian stallion, Nero d'Avola, which is proving to be a hero of both the vineyard and the wine glass.

Translating as 'black grape of Avola', Nero d'Avola hails from the Italian town after which it is named. It didn't arrive in Australia until 1998 and while it's not widely known, it's proving to be a delicious drink.

The beauty of Nero d'Avola is that in extreme heat it retains its acidity, which is music to the ears of our warm climate winemakers, who can craft a red that has refreshing acidity, making it beautifully balanced.

Like its Italian friend Fiano, Nero d'Avola is also an environmentally sound choice as it doesn't ask much of our precious water supplies.

Nero d'Avola an infographic guide

Australian Nero d

Origins

The Italian town of Avola is on Sicily and Nero d'Avola is considered the island's most important red wine grape. While initially only planted on the southern tip of Sicily by visiting Greeks, it's now grown all over the island and thrives in the hot, arid conditions. Nero d'Avola has historically been considered a blending variety, only recently emerging as a trendy mono-varietal.

Regions

The Barossa an Australian Nero d avola wine regionLike Fiano, which I talked about last time, Nero d'Avola is a perfect grape choice for Australia given its love of hot, dry climates. On the Tasting Panel, we've seen some beautiful examples from moderate to warm climates like the Barossa Valley, McLaren Vale, Riverland, Heathcote and Murray Darling.

Nero d'Avola Tasting Notes

Nero d'Avola is made in two different styles. The first is fragrant and crunchy, light to medium bodied, almost like Pinot Noir. The second is dark and densely coloured with black fruits and spice and a weight more reminiscent
of Shiraz.

In Australia, you're more likely to come across the first style, as our Nero d'Avola vines are younger and therefore have not got to the point of producing more robust wines.

Food matching

Spaghetti with crab lime zucchinni & tomato recipeThe high acidity that characterises Nero d'Avola means it will work well with any of your favourite tomato-based recipes. For the lighter styles think grilled fish and light meats in Mediterranean-style dishes. You can even chill these styles on a warm day. The richer ones are more suited to braised dishes and curries. Explore our great range of recipes here

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